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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ACNHOR: A rising rate, a tagging tourist and a rollicking roll - all coming up in today`s show.

  • We`ll start with the branches of the U.S. government.

  • The legislative branch, Congress, makes the laws,

  • but it`s the judicial branch`s job to interpret those laws and decide if they violate the Constitution.

  • U.S. Supreme Court sessions start in October.

  • Over several months, the nine justices hear arguments in dozens of cases.

  • They do legal research, vote on the cases and write up their opinions.

  • When all of that`s finished, the Supreme Court makes its rulings public.

  • Usually around this time every year.

  • Athena Jones gives us a preview of the possible rulings for some of these sessions cases.

  • ATHENA JONES, CNN CORRESPONDENT: From now until the end of June, the Supreme Court is expected to rule on big issues:

  • affirmative action and same sex marriage.

  • TOM GOLDSTEIN, CO-FOUNDER, SCOTUS BLOG: It`s almost unimaginable, the number of things the Supreme Court is going to decide that affects all Americans in the next months.

  • JONES: First up could be whether public schools can consider race when admitting students.

  • Abigail Fisher sued the University of Texas arguing she was rejected because she is white.

  • ABIGAIL FISHER, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PLAINTIFF: I hope the court rules that a student`s race and ethnicity should not be considered when applying to the University of Texas.

  • ONES: The school says race is one of many factors it uses to achieve diversity on campus.

  • Court watchers say Anthony Kennedy could side with conservative justices to overturn or limit a major Supreme Court decision from ten years ago that allowed affirmative action.

  • The justices are also dealing with another hot-button issue: same sex marriage.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: From the (inaudible), the marriage is between one man and one woman. And you guys don`t want to accept it.

  • JONES: Considering whether California`s Proposition 8 ban is constitutional and in a second case,

  • if the Defense of Marriage Act can deny same sex couple the same federal benefits as heterosexual ones.

  • EDITH WINDSOR, DOMA PLAINTIFF: I think it`s going to be good.

  • JONES: That case was brought by Edith Windsor,

  • a New York who had to pay higher estate taxes after her wife died than someone in a heterosexual marriage would have.

  • GOLDSTEIN: I think it`s likely in the Defense of Marriage Act case that the Supreme Court would invalidate the federal law that says we won`t recognize state same sex marriages.

  • But in the California Proposition 8 case, the justices seem unlikely to require under the Constitution every state to recognize same sex marriage.

  • The ruling may not be a huge gay rights victory at all, but I doubt it`s going to be a significant loss either.

  • JONES: Another case involves the kind of genetic testing that led actress Angelina Jolie to undergo a double mastectomy.

  • The court is considering whether human genes, so called products of nature, can be patented.

  • Athena Jones, CNN, Washington.

  • AZUZ: Our next story today, there are different ways to pay for college.

  • One is to take out a student loan.

  • Those come with interests, the fee that you have to pay back with the loan, interest rates telling you how much that fee is.

  • 7 million or one third of U.S. college students who have loans have subsidized loans.

  • That means that government pays some of their interest.

  • Six years ago, the interest rate on federal loans was 6.8 percent, then Congress cut that in half.

  • So these borrowers wouldn`t have to pay as much interest.

  • But on July First, the interest rate on those subsidized loans is set to go back to where it was before.

  • Congress and the president don`t want that to happen, but they can`t agree on a new plan.

  • If nothing happens, the rate for these loans will automatically go up and students who have them will owe more money when they get out of school.

  • When Chelesa Fearce starts college in the fall, she`ll technically be a junior.

  • Her time in high school was all about achieving despite adversity.

  • CHELESA FEARCE, HIGH SCHOOL VALEDICTORIAN: I would just open my book in the back and just (inaudible) just told myself,

  • don`t worry about that. Think about now. If you (inaudible).

  • AZUZ: Most of her high school years, Chelesa and her family were homeless.

  • They lived in shelters, sometimes they lived in their car.

  • Chelesa stayed focused on her education.

  • Her SAT score made her a star student at her school, her GPA made her valedictorian.

  • And a high school graduate has some advice for anyone else who might be facing challenges.

  • FEARCE: Don`t give up, do what you have to do right now so that you can have the future that you want.

  • AZUZ: Chelesa`s story is great example of the power of perseverance, we want to hear yours.

  • Go to our blog at cnnstudentnews.com, tell us about a time when you`ve overcome a challenge.

  • We`re looking forward to your posts, but remember, we`re only looking for your first names.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mrs. Hadel`s current world issues class at Rapid River public schools in Rapid River, Michigan.

  • Which of the countries on this map is Egypt?

  • Here we go. Is it A, B, C, or D?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • Egypt borders Libya, Sudan and the Mediterranean Sea.

  • It`s been home to civilizations for thousands of years.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

  • AZUZ: Earlier this month, a Chinese government official told his nation`s travelers to behave.

  • Chinese tourists spend more money abroad than anyone else in the world,

  • and their government wants them to give a good impression.

  • At least one 15-year old didn`t get the message.

  • He was on vacation touring an ancient Egyptian temple.

  • By ancient I mean 3500 years old.

  • And in a stone sculpture he carved his name and the words "was here."

  • Of course, this isn`t the only historic monument to be defaced by graffiti, though it might be one of the oldest and the message might be one of the dumbest.

  • Some of the people angriest about this are the teenager`s country men and women who`ve graffited his name all over Chinese social media in criticism.

  • They young man`s parents have publicly apologized, both to the Egyptian and Chinese people saying they take responsibility and that their son has learned his lesson.

  • As for the sculpture itself, it`s gotten a professional cleaning, though that didn`t entirely removed the graffiti.

  • DAN SIMON, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Smartphones can do a lot of things: they can make calls, we can text, surf the Web, it can also make us a target.

  • Cell-phone theft is increasing in cities around the country.

  • We are not talking about somebody stealing the phone out of your bag when you`re not looking.

  • We mean stealing it right out of your hand.

  • Situation has some people calling for actions.

  • This surveillance video shows a woman getting robbed of her cell phone while in the middle of a conversation.

  • A crime so common, that type in "cell phone theft" on Youtube,

  • and you`ll find tons of surveillance video of people having their phones ripped off.

  • San Francisco`s police chief says in many cases users are asking for trouble.

  • CHIEF GREG SUHR, SAN FRANCISCO POLICE: Think if you took $300 out of the ATM machine.

  • You wouldn`t walk down the block for several blocks counting the 20s.

  • SIMON: The problem is becoming so rampant that it`s estimated that stolen devices cost consumers $40 billion a year.

  • So pressure is mounting for cell-phone carriers and the device makers to figure out a way to deter theft.

  • San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon wants to see a so-called kill switch on phones.

  • GEORGE GASCON, SAN FRANCISCO DISTRICT ATTORNEY: So that when they get report it`s stolen, they could be render inoperable.

  • SIMON: He accuses the industry of dragging its feet to what he calls a technological solution.

  • GASCON: Every time that a phone gets stolen, we go back and we replace it for him.

  • So the carrier gets to make another sale,

  • the manufacturer gets to make another sale,

  • and the profit just continue to be.

  • SIMON: The nation`s largest carriers, though, are getting more aggressive.

  • Now, participating in a new nationwide database for stolen phones to prevent them from being activated.

  • But critics say it`s yet to have a meaningful impact, because stolen phones often wind up overseas and fetch more dollars.

  • GASCON: The late model iPhone ranks here, just down the street from here can bring about $300.

  • If it gets exported to Latin America or Asia or Africa, it can bring in as much as seven to $1000.

  • SIMON: But is a kill switch even possible?

  • We went to arguable the leading mobile security company in the world,

  • Lookout, which makes a popular app for Smartphones.

  • (on camera): The notion of just being able to render a phone useless.

  • Can that happen?

  • MARC ROGERS, LOOKOUT, INC.: It`s technically plausible.

  • A phone is just a computer.

  • If you destroy the - an operating system the phone relies on, the phone company

  • SIMON: So, if it`s technically possible, why isn`t that happening?

  • ROGERS: Because it`s not a very easy thing to do.

  • SIMON: Now, Apple`s iPhone does have a feature that will track stolen phones and erase the data, sometimes more valuable than the phone itself.

  • Lookout has a similar feature for phones using Google`s android.

  • But the point, according to critics, is the entire industry needs bolder thinking.

  • AZUZ: And finally, this show is going downhill in a hurry.

  • But the faster, the better for these competitors.

  • It`s the annual unofficial cheese roll near Gloucester, England.

  • It`s not the official event because of concerns about injuries.

  • Can`t think why.

  • The winner is anyone who makes it down in one piece.

  • They don`t chase a real wheel of cheese anymore.

  • Now they use a fake, made out of foam.

  • Consider it a fauxmage (ph).

  • We`re planning to go on a roll with a bunch of cheesy puns, but we didn`t want to grind you down.

  • Besides, cheesy pun haters are just lactose intolerant.

  • Oh, well. We did the dairy best we curd, and we`ll be back to do it again tomorrow.

  • I`ll see you all then.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ACNHOR: A rising rate, a tagging tourist and a rollicking roll - all coming up in today`s show.

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