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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi, I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • In yesterday`s special edition we asked you to share your thoughts about this week`s deadly tornado in Oklahoma.

  • From Rebecca, "We can`t stop this.

  • But we can try our best to work on helping the victims and repairing the damage.

  • And from Jessica, "Stay strong, stay together and hold on, because Oklahoma is getting on the road to recovery.

  • That road is certain to be a long one.

  • As people return to their homes, they are starting to rebuild.

  • Insurance officials think the tornado might have caused more than $2 billion in damages.

  • Chris Cuomo examined the power of the storm.

  • CHRIS CUOMO, CNN CORRESPONDENT: We`re going to take you through the tornado`s path from beginning to end.

  • If you look down here, you`re going to see a brown line, starts with this debris field, it starts going in this direction.

  • That is actually the tornado`s trail, and as you see, it`s going to get much more dramatic as we get near populated area.

  • You literally can trace with your finger a line where the tornado wind, the path is completely obvious.

  • It`s about a block and a half line, and you notice it just by seeing everything that`s destroyed.

  • Right now we`re flying at 2500 feet above the ground, scientists say that debris of the tornado (inaudible) ten times as high as we are right now into the air.

  • Look at the trees. It looks like people pulled them up and laid them down there just like they were weeding their garden.

  • But those are huge old (inaudible) trees.

  • Cars are just littered along the trail.

  • They were never there, they weren`t parked here, they were tossed like toys.

  • This part of the community really shows you the randomness and intensity of the tornado.

  • Some homes are just completely (inaudible).

  • And in a block away, they`ve been spared.

  • And this part of the debris trail ends at a school where children lost their lives.

  • AZUZ: To protect themselves during the storm, some people were in the storm shelters in their homes,

  • this Youtube video shows what it looked like when one Oklahoma family came out of its shelter.

  • The mayor of Moore, Oklahoma, the city that was hit the worst by this tornado says he is going to push for a new law.

  • It would require that any new home has to be built with either storm shelter or a safe room.

  • The safe room was all that was left standing when the tornado hit this family`s home in Alabama in 2011.

  • The house was destroyed, but the family stayed inside their room.

  • These special rooms and shelters aren`t luxurious, they have one purpose to keep people alive and Gary Tuchman shows us how.

  • GARY TUCHMAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: The people who lived in this house that was destroyed, survived.

  • They survived because they left well in advance.

  • But if they didn`t leave well in advance, they would have survived also because they had this heavy metal storm shelter.

  • I want to show you how it works.

  • You open the door, and you take a look inside.

  • And you see it`s very cramped inside, there`s not much room, but plenty of room to survive.

  • Walk down the steps with your family, you could probably fit seven or eight people and fit important things in here:

  • clothing, pictures, valuables, you come in and then you just shut the door.

  • And you`re safe and sound as the tornado goes above you.

  • There is no doubt the people would have survived if they went inside the shelter.

  • When the storm`s over, you open it up, and you all come out.

  • One thing to keep in mind, you may say wow, the rubble falls on this, how do you get out?

  • Well, you don`t lift it up, you slide it, and you slide it under here.

  • Now, if the rubble does fall on top of here, lots of rubble, you may not be able to slide it,

  • but then you`re alive and presumably you`ve told your relatives that you`re in here,

  • and they tell rescuers, and they come and they rescue you.

  • Now, one thing you might wonder, why don`t schools in the tornado belt in Oklahoma and Texas and Kansas all have storm shelters, all have basements.

  • Well, we should point out, it`s not a law, and the fact is, many school districts say it`s just not economically feasible to have these.

  • They cost several thousands dollars, these personal shelters.

  • AZUZ: At the two elementary schools hit by Monday`s tornado, teachers helped keep students safe.

  • They gathered them in the safe areas, they shielded them with their bodies, sometimes putting their own lives at risks.

  • Many people are calling them heroes, the teachers say, it`s just our job.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Before I shut the doors, because those bathrooms had doors, I said them to shut these doors,

  • and I said I love you, the boys looked at me a little strange, locked in the girls and said, I love you.

  • And they all said, I love you back. I just told them to pray.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So I told them to get underneath the desks and I put them two by two,

  • and I said, OK, we`re going to play our musical instruments, we`re going to play (inaudible), and we`re going to play as loud as we can.

  • So I wanted - didn`t want them to hear the roar.

  • DAVID WHEELER, DROVE 100 MILES TO FIND SON: She helped save my son`s life, she helped other students` life

  • and we`re proud of her and we all take an oath as an educator to protect the kids.

  • And she fulfilled that duty better than anyone, and so, we want to thank her,

  • and she`s a member of our family for the rest of our lives, and she`ll be a part of it forever.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Is this legit?

  • The legal phrase "plead the Fifth" refers to the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution?

  • It`s true! That amendment says that citizen can`t be forced to be a witness against himself.

  • AZUZ: So, basically, if what you say can potentially be harmful to yourself, you could plead the Fifth.

  • An IRS official did that during a congressional hearing this week.

  • OIS LERNER, IRS EXEMPT ORGANIZATIONS DIRECTOR: I have not done anything wrong.

  • And while I would very much like to answer the committee`s questions today,

  • I`ve been advised by my counsel to assert my constitutional right not to testify or answer questions related to the subject matter of this hearing.

  • AZUZ: A report says employees in lowest Lerner`s division essentially used political bias.

  • They targeted conservative groups for extra review when they applied for a special tax status.

  • The report blamed mismanagement and bad policies.

  • Members of the committee holding hearings say they`re frustrated with the IRS`s lack of answers.

  • REP. DARRELL ISSA, (R-CALIFORNIA): The American people don`t expect perfection.

  • Men and women, many of them working very hard and trying to do the best within government make mistakes.

  • A few make wrongdoings and do so deliberately.

  • This committee will not stop this investigation until we know that the IRS is fixed.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mr. Langhorst and the students and South Valley Junior High in Liberty, Missouri.

  • What nation`s flag is this? You know what to do?

  • Is it Ireland, Mexico, Italy or Cote d`Ivoire?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • The green, white and red stripes mean you`re looking at the national flag of Italy.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

  • AZUZ: In Italy, the pizza business is booming, restaurant owners are looking to hire thousands of people to work in their kitchens,

  • but they are having trouble finding Italians who want to take those jobs.

  • The reason - pizza makers work long hours making a lot of dough, they don`t make a lot of money.

  • Ben Wedeman looks at who is filling these jobs.

  • BEN WEDEMAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: It can get pretty hot in the pizza kitchen, and for the pizzaolo (ph), the pizza chef, there is no time for rest.

  • Increasingly, many Italians, however, can`t stand the heat in the kitchen and are getting out of this most Italian of professions.

  • Despite high unemployment, they are leaving it to others like Gamal from Egypt to make the dough.

  • And that`s just fine with Gamal.

  • "It`s an area where lots of jobs are available," he tells me.

  • He`s been in Italy for almost a dozen years.

  • And recently was hired by the Tramonto di Roma restaurant in the seaside suburb of Ostia.

  • Across this city, you`re more likely to find a Bangladeshi or Bosnian or an Egyptian than a local working the oven.

  • It doesn`t phase pizza critic Armando evaluating Gamal`s work.

  • "It`s good," he says, "the crust is thin, as I and a lot of people here like it, and it`s tasty."

  • And maybe pizza isn`t really as Italian as is commonly thought.

  • According to some historians, pizza actually comes from Egypt anyway, so there`s nothing unusual about having an Egyptian make your pizza.

  • "There is nothing odd about it" says Gamal, a most practical man.

  • "I`m here to work, if there`s work, I`ll do it."

  • AZUZ: Speaking of pies, today`s last story is sweet.

  • That`s Jamie the Bear MacDonald in front of a giant apple pie, and the bear is about to make this scene grizzly (ph).

  • Hey, Jamie, how do you like them apples?

  • Just fine, since they`re giving him world records for speed and quantity.

  • The Bear devoured (inaudible), he`s like the pied piper of pastry.

  • Was this even a challenge? Nah, it was easy as pie.

  • If you think this kind of contest seems silly, keep it to yourself.

  • Pie champs, they rue (ph) barbs (ph).

  • And they only operate in one mode, alla mode.

  • You know how they keep track of the contestants at this kind of thing?

  • With a pie chart.

  • That`s a good joke no matter how you slice it.

  • You might have noticed an extra filling of puns today.

  • We didn`t flake out, we`re going for our own record. Why? Just be crust.

  • But we`ve said a mouthful.

  • The previous record was 12, this makes a baker`s dozen.

  • For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I`m Carl Azuz.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi, I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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