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  • Hey. Welcome to another episode of 8IELTS.

  • And you might be wondering why were not in the regular setting.

  • But we are in the studio you know I need to get out of this box.

  • And if you have already guessed,

  • this topic today is OUT OF THE BOX.

  • It’s on the creativity and living life differently.

  • And you know I really have a special guest today.

  • And were at the different section of the studio because were also wanna live out of the box and we wanna think of out of the box.

  • And were doing the show in different way.

  • This is our guess, she is an example of living out of the box and be creative at learning constantly.

  • So were gonna talk to her. Let’s go.

  • Hey, as you can see, we no longer have the regular chairs and tables as we normally do.

  • Right now, were sitting on top of a match, in Vietnamese they call chiếu.

  • And were going to talk today in a very unconventional style, in a Vietnamese style because we have a special guess today.

  • We have Mago, whore in the studio with us and Mago travelled here already from the U.K.

  • And the reason why we have her here is because she is continuously learning.

  • And she’s always trying out new things and you know, she’s gonna have some really good stories to share with us.

  • Alright, before that I’m going to invite you to drink a cup of tea.

  • I’m gonna pour you a cup of Vietnamese tea.

  • So in Vietnam, we also love to have tea set in small real tiny cup like this.

  • Thank you. - Yeah.

  • In Vietnam, we always pour tea to invite people into our house.

  • Yes.

  • And whenever we make new friends, tea is also. We call itTrà tâm giaomeaning with tea, we can speak from the heart.

  • I see. It’s so good custom.

  • Cheers.

  • How does that taste?

  • Very strong. A little bit better but after the bitterness, you can taste the sweetness

  • Yes. It’s different.

  • It’s very different from English tea.

  • Tell us a little bit about why you came to Vietnam to stay.

  • I came to Vietnam because I was curious about Asian countries.

  • And I had talked with Asian people as I calles

  • I met a lot of interesting people from Vietnam and other Asian places.

  • And I wanted to see if Asia was so very different from Europe

  • and my particular friend that I came to see as well.

  • And I know who that particular friend is. Yes. He’s the producer of this show.

  • That’s it. Yes.

  • That’s how we got you to be on the show. So thank you for coming.

  • And I do know that youre a big learner

  • You learn every day and you used to teach people as well.

  • So how is it different now compared to you and your 20 years old?

  • It’s different because I’m not working toparticular goals now,

  • but I’m having fulfilment in finding out different things.

  • When I was 20 years old, I was busy in having it finally.

  • We had family problems when I was a teenager.

  • And it mean my education was stopped.

  • I had to leave school and work for my living.

  • So it wasn’t until I got married and in my twenties did I feel it’s time to finish my education that wasn’t finished before.

  • And that’s when I looked around to possibilities

  • did sufficient examinations that I hadn’t done it at the school in order to get into a college for teachers.

  • That’s what I did in my twenties

  • and I was able to that and bring up the family at the same time thanks for some help from my husband.

  • So why you still continue to learn and explore new things?

  • Because I think it’s never a time to say that’s enough, youve learned enough because there’s always something new.

  • Quite often you might here an interesting program on the television and think why I didn’t know anything about that, how do I find out?

  • And you have time for hobbies when you haven’t got a family ….anymore.

  • You have time to develop your hobbies and learn more about the things that you like to do.

  • And how young are you this year?

  • I’m 77 at the moment. I should be 78 in the autumn.

  • Ah, youre 77 at the moment and you started learning because, joining the late learning because.

  • Because I had more time and there were things that I thought that I hadn’t developed within myself.

  • I still have more potential.

  • So I know that at IBC, you did a very interesting course.

  • You jump right into a group of youngsters.

  • How was that? It’s brilliant for you.

  • They were brilliant.

  • What is difficult for you to mingle with all these young people?

  • Not really, no. because were all new to the subject and all discussing things in our lecture time.

  • I feel equal and the young people maybe feelto sit with one of them.

  • So now that your other IBC in public are going back in the summer. I heard that your schedule is pat nowadays.

  • What did your schedule look like on the daily basis?

  • On the daily basis, what do I do?

  • I have different things which I do each day.

  • For instance, on Tuesdays I take a disabled friend to our art group and I’ve been teaching her how to do a painting because she lost the use of her right arm.

  • So she had to learn everything form the scratch with her left hand.

  • So I’ve gone to the stages of her building up from colouring and drawing and painting.

  • And she’s getting on well and she loves to go to that ….. And I go to the rock…. Where I learn to sing.

  • And then what else do you do?

  • I had been learning Spanish on Wednesday and it finishes for a year.

  • At the moment, I didn’t want to go back with, I just wanted to learn basic Spanish mainly.

  • So that I could read messages that I have on Facebook from some of my South American friends from IBC.

  • Some of them are posting in Spanish so now I’m able to read what theyre saying.

  • No I love that youre source of learning. Yes you learn for yourself.

  • But it’s also because you wanna communicate better, you wanna understand better the people around you.

  • I think it’s very very lovely.

  • So I do know that, I can see you guys make rain together.

  • Yeah, do you mind showing us a little bit of how you do that.

  • I think we could do that.

  • Later on we can ask them to come up and perform something.

  • OK, so how do we make rain?

  • We make rain in several ways.

  • We can start a rainy day by making a simple noise with our hands.

  • We can go on to some clicking.

  • Yes, maybe we can have a few

  • And that the rain is getting harder, we can come in with slapping noises.

  • The rain is beating against the leaves.

  • We hear the leaves rustle….the thunderstorm’s coming.

  • And finally it’s the, really it’s the height of the storm, we want some…..

  • Standing we could do that with our feet and we have some heavy shoes on, otherwise better with hands.

  • Yes we have clouds and then trigger less.

  • And then the rain looses down and we go reverse the movements.

  • We go to the clicking and then the.

  • Now the leaves rustle back and we have to drop couple of remaining drops.

  • Splashing on the sidewalk. Splashing on the rooftop.

  • I wonder what would it be like to have the whole big group, the big crew to do all of this together.

  • I think it’s gonna sound really good.

  • It sounds better with a lot of people, yes.

  • Should we have a crew come up and try to do perform something together?

  • Yes, let’s do that.

  • Alright, that was a lot of rain.

  • We did make it rain with all of our hands, our legs, our feet.

  • But of course the rain will need to go because were gonna go back into the house.

  • And were going to enter back into a Vietnamese household.

  • Let’s see what’s the Vietnamese household offers.

  • Ok, were back to the Vietnamese household and we gonna have a little bit of dinner, it’s a traditional Vietnamese dinner.

  • Shall we have the hot dinner traditional style?

  • Thank you.

  • My goodness.

  • Ok, I’ve got it.

  • A feast.

  • It does look like a feast, doesn’t it?

  • Well, let me introduce a little bit.

  • In Vietnam, most people eat on the mat and most people eat with a little tray here.

  • And the tray serves the whole family.

  • For Vietnamese tradition, normally we have at least three dishes: a vegetable dish, a meat dish, a soup dish.

  • At least three dishes, rice is not included.

  • We have condiments. This is the condiment.

  • It’s salty vegetable.

  • And then we have our dipping sauce.

  • Over here we have the soup. This is made from mud crabs, mud crab soup and Vietnamese spinach.

  • We have our long beans, which youre probably familiar with.

  • This is our boiled pork and our braised fish.

  • This is quite an exuberant dinner, because we have two meats, normally just one meat.

  • Perhaps I could try something.

  • Alright.

  • How it works in Vietnamese culture is that the host of the house will always serve the guests.

  • The guests don’t serve themselves. The host always gives them food.

  • When the plates are finished, we will top up the food.

  • This is your chopstick if you need it.

  • You can just drink the soup from the bowl.

  • And then the chopsticks are for the vegetables.

  • This might be tricky drinking soup with chopsticks.

  • I manage to pick things up.

  • In Vietnam we just drink it with the bowl, so we just sip it as sip it from a cup.

  • Absolutely nice. Thank you.

  • Would you like to try another one, something else?

  • What sort of fish is this?

  • This is the river fish.

  • This one has both the role and the meat.

  • So let see what that tastes real.

  • Thank you.

  • Careful, there might be some bones.

  • I don’t think therere any but just in case.

  • I hope there’s no bones in there.

  • Yeah, that was lovely. Thank you.

  • That’s the fish and the rest.

  • In Vietnam, this is something that is quite interesting as well.

  • It’s quite adventurous.

  • It looks a little bit like chestnut.

  • They are not chestnuts.

  • They are in the same family as the eggplant.

  • But they are round, they are green.

  • Theyve been salted.

  • It’s quite an acquired taste, so I don’t know if you want to try.

  • But I think it’s very Vietnamese.

  • A lot of Vietnamese eat this.

  • You gonna bite into something quite puncheon,

  • strong, and quite salty and sour.

  • Does it taste like a pickle?

  • Yeah, it’s an acquired taste, isn’t it?

  • Very salty, not taste that sour.

  • It’s quite an puncheon, a burst of flavour, all in one.

  • What’s your least favorite and what’s your favorite?

  • I think the mud crab was my favorite actually.

  • Next the fish.

  • And least is this one.

  • Youre so adventurous and I love that about you.

  • I know youre willing to try new things.

  • Is there an advice you wanna tell younger people, right now a lot of people who have a lot of fear?

  • Theyre fearful of doing something risky, theyre fearful of being out of comfortable.

  • Theyre fearful of other people’s judgments.

  • What do you say to young people nowadays?

  • Be self-assured, believe in yourself.

  • Believe that you can do things, and get on and do them.

  • Always continue to learn, never stop learning, never stop trying.

  • That’s right.

  • ..., something is difficult, ...the fear and you get there in the end.

  • Absolutely.

  • I love that.

  • Thank you.

  • Talking about trying something new, we have this games that we always do on the show, which is called the 8 IELTS MARATHON.

  • But youre not gonna run a marathon, but you gonna be participating in some of the challenges put forth by the show.

  • And it’s going to be an experience that’s a lot of the non-native speakers have to go through to get their English certification.

  • So would you like to try it?

  • Yes, why not?

  • Let’s try it then.

  • Youre back with us.

  • This is the 8IETLS MARATHON and youve seen many MARATHON before but this gonna be very interesting.

  • We have Margo right here with us and she gonna help us complete this 8 IETLS MARATHON.

  • Alright, are you ready?

  • Ok, for the first challenge, we gonna have to work in a team.

  • Yes.

  • I gonna guess several items that you put forth.

  • These are the items that you think are very important in a person’s creativity.

  • And it’s very important to help the person always try and try to learn new things.

  • Yes.

  • Ok. I’m gonna close my eyes and I’m gonna basically listen to whatever descriptions you give me.

  • Ok, one, two, three, I’m closing my eyes.

  • You want to stay quite healthy while youre studying, don’t you?

  • Yes, I do.

  • Sometimes in between meals, you might need a tasty snack.

  • I think this is a banana.

  • Yeah, right.

  • It is definitely a very tasty snack.

  • Do you like bananas Margo?

  • I love bananas.

  • Me too.

  • I think they are great sources of potassium, great source of dietary fiber and it’s really good for people who work out nowadays.

  • You can sometimes get a little bit out of shape.

  • Youre not doing enough exercises.

  • Can you think of something you could have in your study room to help you?

  • There would probably be a fat buster, a massage chair.

  • Yes, an item that helps you to move also.

  • I hear a little bit of clinging sound there.

  • I think it looks like a spinning platform maybe.

  • Yeah, right.

  • There is it, thank you.

  • It’s so soothing listing to your voice.

  • I feel like listening to a movie.

  • It’s great, thank you.

  • And youre going to go on to the next challenge, which is the picture taking challenge.

  • Why don’t you step on over and take your picture?

  • This is actually one of the things all the contestants need to go through when they do their IELTS exam.

  • Ok, I hear the beep.

  • Do we have the perfect picture?

  • You should lean on the platform.