Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hi. I`m Carl Azuz. Just two days from the weekend, we`ve got a lot of interesting reports

  • lined up for you

  • today on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • One story we`ve been following this week is the historic flooding in the U.S. state of

  • Louisiana. A by the numbers look helps us explain how bad it

  • is, especially in Southern Louisiana.

  • Six-point-nine trillion, that`s the number of gallons of rain that started all this,

  • between August 8th and August 14th. Livingston Parish in

  • particular got more than 31 inches of rain in just one day.

  • Forty thousand, that`s the number of homes that had been damaged, in what Louisiana governor

  • calls a major disaster. Twenty thousand, the number of

  • people who`ve been rescued so far. Eleven deaths have been blamed on the floods across

  • the state.

  • Five hundred years, the likelihood that a flood this catastrophic would occur in the

  • Baton Rouge. It means once every 500 years.

  • And finally, 12, the number of Louisiana parishes that had been declared federal disaster areas.

  • That speeds up federal government assistance to

  • them. More than 12 other parishes may also get this declaration.

  • We touched on the definition of flash floods the other day. Jennifer Gray now explores

  • what makes this flood so dangerous.

  • In the U.S., flash floods kill more people than tornadoes, hurricanes or lighting. A

  • flash flood creates a

  • rush of moving water than can sweep a grown man off his feet, a car off the road and even

  • your entire home off its foundation.

  • When the ground becomes so saturated that water can no longer seep in to the soil, it

  • begins to run off quickly into rivers and streams and this

  • causes a rise in water and a flash.

  • Densely populated areas have an extremely high risk of flash flooding with additional

  • concrete than less grassy areas for the water to soak into the

  • soil. And they can see flash flooding very quickly. In mountainous terrain, the combination

  • of gravity, plus the easy runoff can lead to

  • catastrophic flooding when all of that water is funneled into rivers, creeks and even the

  • valleys.

  • Remember, flash flooding can happen in a blink of an eye. That`s why it`s important to stay

  • alert and pay attention in case a flash flood watch or

  • warning is issued for your area.

  • Next today, there are at least two historic American publications that give long range

  • predictions about the weather. One is the old

  • Farmer`s Almanac, the other is the Farmer`s Almanac. Why? Because we like to confuse you.

  • Not really. The old Farmer`s Almanac was founded in 1792. The younger Farmer`s Almanac was

  • founded in 1818. They are different publications, and

  • while the old one predicts the upcoming winter in the U.S. will be colder than last winter

  • but still pretty normal, the Farmer`s Almanac, the younger

  • one, says winter will be a freezing beast from the central to the eastern U.S., lots

  • of cold and snow.

  • Both publications say they`re accurate about 80 percent of the time. A CNN affiliate in

  • north Texas once found that the younger Farmer`s Almanac was

  • pretty accurate for that region. But no matter which almanac you`re talking about, modern

  • meteorologists predict inaccuracies.

  • Farmer`s Almanac: fact or fiction?

  • The Farmer`s Almanac has been around for about 200 years and people continue to buy it for

  • the forecast. Five, six,

  • seven months, they want to know those three-day spreads of when they have a chance of rain,

  • snow or ice. I can tell you, as a meteorologist, we

  • struggle with five, even the seven-days out.

  • You know, I think a lot of farmers do use it. First of all, they live by the sun. I

  • mean, they`re up at down. They work all day. I don`t know if

  • they really use it so much for a forecast.

  • The mystery behind the forecast is just that, it`s a mystery. The secret is actually locked

  • up in a vault. Some think it has to do with magnetic

  • fields in the atmosphere. They`ll tell you they use sun spot activity, there`s no scientific

  • proof that that helps forecasting long term.

  • Ultimately, let me just say, if you`re planning, six months from now to go on a vacation on

  • the beaches in Florida and the almanac says you`re going

  • to be rained out, don`t change your plans.

  • We`ve been looking at several different aspects of the ongoing Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro,

  • Brazil. One major and very public

  • challenge for the South American city, pollution, especially in the water, in places like Guanabara

  • Bay where sailing events are held.

  • In its bid to get the Olympics, Rio officials promised they`d clean up the pollution flowing

  • into the water. And last weekend, the communications

  • director for the games said the water levels at the venues were satisfactory, though there`s

  • still work to do.

  • To explain how the bay got so polluted in the first place, we`re taking you inside the

  • city.

  • Rio`s sailing venue is called the dirtiest Olympic athletes have ever competed in. Floating

  • garbage, even a sofa seething with raw sewage. You`ve seen the pictures. We want to show

  • you where it`s all coming from.

  • Even after recent improvement, only half of homes in Rio connected to a sanitation network.

  • All you have to do is head uphill, that`s where you

  • find raw sewage and garbage flowing freely between houses.

  • In the sprawling favela of Rocinha, Jose Martin Rivera (ph) has been fighting for basic services

  • for decades.

  • "If we had sewage systems, we`d have good health, he says. Instead, we have tuberculosis,

  • rashes and gastrointestinal infections."

  • He takes us on a tour of some of the 23 open sewage canals he`s documented in the neighborhood.

  • Oh my God!

  • Here you can really see what this is all about. You have pipes coming straight out of people`s

  • bathrooms and kitchens, dripping the sewage down.

  • There are even rats running around. It doesn`t get worse than this.

  • Flushed out, untreated, families of rats and the smell that just makes you gag, flowing

  • past houses and along footpaths, whisking trash

  • along with it especially in heavy rains. Until it all ends up on Rio`s beaches, in the lagoon

  • where rowers are competing, Team USA armed with

  • anti-microbial suits, and Guanabara Bay sailors and wind surfers are warned to shut their

  • mouths against the toxic spray.

  • When you`re out shopping, watching for sales or styles, cameras might be watching you and

  • not just for security. Retailers want to know

  • what displays get the most attention, what store locations get the most foot traffic.

  • The U.S. Federal Trade Commission says that many shoppers don`t want their movements tracked.

  • They`re concerned about their privacy if they`re being

  • electronically followed around. But for retailers, monitoring could be key to sales.

  • This type of shopping is becoming the old way of doing things, e-commerce is nipping

  • at the heels of brick and mortar retail sales.

  • That`s because online retailers know you better. They can track your every move, what we like,

  • what we buy, and how we shop.

  • But a new heat mapping technology called Prism is evening the playing field for brick and

  • mortar stores like Rachel Shachtman`s (ph).

  • I think we`re on the edge of retail Armageddon, which might be a little bit extreme. But I

  • do think, you know, what would Amazon

  • be without incites and analytics.

  • If you can`t track them while they shop, customers might as will be invisible.

  • Here are I am, trying those sun glasses.

  • Prism figured out how to use security cameras to capture shoppers` motions, what they touched,

  • which way they entered and which areas they like most.

  • Is red good or bad?

  • Red is busy. The same way the Amazon or all these big online guys understand their customers

  • to what they do and what they click

  • and what they go on, the retailers need to understand that as well. So, we get that same

  • kind of data.

  • There`s about 25 things on this table. How do you know what people are picking up?

  • So, when you`re looking at the map, that will give you a sense, right, of where the most

  • action is. So, kind of look at that and

  • pull the queues here, look at sales and say, you know what? This journal is not selling

  • and maybe it`s because this sign is right in front of it.

  • So, I think we might have to play a little bit of retail Tetris.

  • Prism`s clients range from supermarkets, to furniture stores, to big tech retailers.

  • Just to make sure that all my stores kind of conform and check on it is an action that`s

  • going to increase sales if everyone

  • executed properly or it`s going to save costs, because I didn`t need to travel around 20

  • stores to do that. Because retail is real life thing

  • that`s happening every minute. So, every minute, you don`t change something to retail, you`d

  • probably miss an opportunity.

  • Many of your teachers might remember playing Pac-Man while eating Twinkies. In this live

  • game, Twinkie is Pac-Man while eating balloons.

  • Let`s explain. The Pac-Man you see actually a Jack Russell Terrier named Twinkie. He holds

  • the Guinness World Record for popping balloons. In this

  • awesome YouTube video, he`s just doing it in a large maze with paper ghosts floating

  • around on sticks. No one gets hurt except the balloons, the dog

  • is super cute, so why not?

  • You can`t deny, it`s amazing. The balloons don`t have a ghost of a chance. It looks just

  • like the original arf-cade and that dog is Russell enough fun

  • Jack with no time to terrier.

  • That gobbles up all our time on CNN STUDENT NEWS. Play again tomorrow. It won`t cost you

  • a quarter.

Hi. I`m Carl Azuz. Just two days from the weekend, we`ve got a lot of interesting reports

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

Aug 18, 2016 - CNN Student News with subtitle

  • 6007 221
    陳思源 posted on 2016/08/19
Video vocabulary