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  • Hey guys! So you guys have been asking me for forever what my job was because most of

  • you seemed to think it was some sort of magical miracle job where you could just like travel

  • and have fun and go to Japan and Korea and stuff and that's not what it was at all. And

  • I'm sure most of you are going to be disappointed, and quite a few of you are probably also going

  • to be angry, too. So I can't wait to read the comments on this video later. So I was

  • an officer in the United States Air Force and this is going to answer like a hundred

  • of the questions that you guys have always asked me, so I'm going to go ahead and answer

  • them all here in this video now. Along with a bunch of the questions that I'm assuming--

  • it's a bug. Along with a bunch of the questions I'm that

  • I'm assuming I'm going to get after this video. So please watch this whole video before asking

  • me questions down in the comments. After that of course you're free to ask me what you want.

  • I can't guarantee you I'm going to answer it because I'm not going to talk about my

  • job details. I'm not going to talk about my AFSC. You just don't put that kind of military

  • stuff out on the internet. So, sorry if I can't answer your questions.

  • So this is why Jun and I lived apart for 4 1/2 years. Because I had a contract, and one

  • does not just break a military contract. Especially as an officer. If you want to get out of your

  • contract as an officer it has to go up to the Secretary of the Air Force. That's a really

  • big freaking deal! So yeah, it's not easy. You can't just like say, "I'm not doing this

  • anymore!" You get put in military prison! This is also why I was supposed to move to

  • Korea a long time ago, because I had orders to go to Korea for an assignment. They cancelled

  • my orders literally the day before I was supposed to leave, because--I don't know if you can

  • see this, if this video is like too bright or whatever. I know you can see it on some

  • of my other videos. This is a scar from the smallpox vaccine. Because if you're going

  • to Korea, you get the smallpox vaccine because North Korea is CRAZY. You don't know if one

  • day maybe Kim Jong Un just decides to release smallpox on South Korea. So, I had a rare

  • reaction to that called Myopericarditis that damaged my heart. And they decided that suddenly

  • I couldn't do like anything anymore and instead of going to Korea I became an instructor for

  • international officers, which was actually really cool. I got to work with officers from

  • countries all over the world. I think I worked with like 13 different countries, including

  • Japan. I did get to work with an officer from the Self Defense Forces. He was really nice

  • and very professional. He was a very good representative of Japan. I worked with quite

  • a few officers of much higher rank than me from the Middle East. And being the ignorant

  • person that I am I didn't know how it was going to be being a woman of a lower rank

  • being their instructor. Be they were all extremely respectful of me. And originally what I wanted

  • to do was work with people from other cultures and I did get to do that, I guess. And that

  • was pretty cool. So when I was in university I was taking steps

  • to improve myself and I started exercising in the morning with one of my friends. I was

  • approached one day by someone from the Army ROTC who was like, "You know the army could

  • use women like you who care about their physical fitness." And I was like, "PFFFT I'm not joining

  • the army! Are you crazy?" But I am an open person and even if it's something that I don't

  • agree with I still want to listen to what the other person's saying. So I went and I

  • made an appointment to go talk to their person anyway just to see what they had to say. And

  • what they told me was actually pretty interesting. At that time I had no idea what I wanted to

  • do. I had been switching majors all over the place, from Geology to Graphic Design to International

  • Relations. And there were several things that appealed to me about the idea of being an

  • officer in the military. One of them was I might be able to get a scholarship, and being

  • that I was paying for my own tuition that was kind of appealing. One of them was I could

  • do it for two years without signing a contract so I could learn more about what it was actually

  • like before making any sort of commitment, which was really reassuring. It was going

  • to force me to get in shape because I hated exercising. It was going to force me to learn

  • how to become a leader. And I've said this before in earlier videos but I used to be

  • an extremely shy person. Getting up in front of people, my heart would be pounding so much,

  • my face would be completely red. I would forget everything. I wouldn't be able to talk to

  • people. I cried in front of authority figures because I was so intimidated. So I thought

  • maybe this could be good for my self-improvement. I thought as an officer it wouldn't be like

  • I was just following orders and not being able to make any sort of decisions. I figured

  • as an officer I would be the person leading other people. So I thought maybe I could be

  • that person in that position who could help the military overall make better decisions

  • that are better for my country and better for other countries. Maybe I could help inspire

  • the people who are under me to care about the people in other countries so that we don't

  • abuse anyone. I thought I might be able to get to travel with this. I could go meet people

  • from other countries. Maybe I could be like some sort of liaison so I could help them

  • understand us and us understand them so that we're doing something that's better for both

  • of us. I wanted to be that person who could like

  • help make the military a better place and I thought you know as an officer maybe I could

  • do something like that. And the other thing that was really reassuring for me coming from

  • someone who would never, ever join the military, was that the oath we took as an officer was

  • to defend the Constitution. It wasn't to defend our President. It wasn't to defend someone

  • else's needs. It was to defend the Constitution. We were taught constantly in training that

  • if we are given an illegal order, it's our duty to disobey that illegal order. And then

  • of course if you complete your four years of active duty and then you get out of the

  • military, you have really great experience to put on your resume. So that might help

  • me get a different, better job later on. So for all of those reasons I decided I might

  • as well just try it out for the free trial period where I don't have to make any promises

  • or sign any contracts or anything, just to see if I really thought it's something I might

  • be interested in. And at my university we had Army ROTC and

  • we had Air Force ROTC right across the hall from each other. And I went home and I talked

  • to everyone I knew and I was like, "I'm thinking about joining the military. Should I join

  • the army or should I join the Air Force?" And every single one of them said, "Join the

  • Air Force! Do not join the Army!!" And so I was like, "Oh, okay, I guess. I don't know

  • anything about the military so I guess I'll trust your opinion." And I went in and I just

  • joined the Air Force ROTC. And I had this image in my mind of like military people being

  • like super tough, like brutish people, like hulk-type people. But it turns out that each

  • branch kind of has its own specific type of person. And the Air Force branch is the nerdy

  • branch. And so pretty much half of them were engineers, most of them played video games.

  • Even the people I knew who got pilot slots played WoW. And so I was kind of like, "Oh...

  • these are my people! You know, I kinda feel like I belong here." And at that time I was

  • studying both Russian and Japanese because they were the two coolest languages that my

  • school offered. And when the cadre found out, one of them was like, "You know, if you major

  • in Japanese, we can give you a full scholarship." I was like, "Really?! I can major in a language

  • and have my school paid for?! YES, I WILL DO THAT! OKAY!!" But we didn't have a Japanese

  • major at my school at that time. We had Asian Studies. And at that time, for the Foreign

  • Express Scholarship you could do an area studies and still get the scholarship as long as you

  • focused in the language that you were supposed be majoring in. And that's why!! That's why

  • I spent so much time learning Japanese! And so that's what I did. And I had this image

  • in my mind of like, you know, one day when I commission and I become a real officer,

  • they're going to send me to another country. Maybe they'll send me to Japan because I'm

  • studying Japanese and then I can be a liaison and I can do good stuff for people! And so

  • I signed a contract with them, I got my full scholarship, they helped pay for my school,

  • and it was awesome. And then my final summer in college it was a free summer for me so

  • I wanted to study abroad somewhere at least once. And since I was getting paid to learn

  • Japanese, and I was majoring in Japanese, I was like, "I'll go to Japan!"

  • And I got to Japan and literally one of the first people I met when I got off the plane

  • was Jun. Within two weeks I was madly head over heels for him. He eventually asked me

  • out and right away we pretty much decided we wanted to be together forever. And EVERYTHING

  • about my priorities changed and I no longer wanted to do military stuff. I just wanted

  • to be with Jun. But it was too late because I already signed my contract. So I had to

  • go back to America. I had to serve my active duty. We didn't really have any options because

  • Jun was still in university. He had longer to go than me before he graduated. And then

  • even after that he was the oldest son in his family and he kind of needed to stay in Japan

  • and get a job and that kind of stuff. So there wasn't really much I could do unless I could

  • be stationed near him (because we have three Air Force bases in Japan). But the military

  • doesn't care about boyfriends. They don't care about fiancés. So, in order for them

  • to care about me being with Jun so that they could help me get closer to him, we had to

  • be married. So we kind of got married a little quickly: only a year and a half after we met.

  • We never had a ceremony. I never changed my name or anything. And it helped because they

  • did try to get me to Japan. There just weren't any jobs available there, so... They were

  • able to get me a job in Korea but then you know how that turned out. And so now, after

  • my contract I'm finally here in Japan with Jun! And I'm so happy that we're finally together.

  • There were a lot of things I really hated about the military. I resented it so much

  • for keeping me from Jun, even though in the end it's my fault because I signed a contract.

  • I knew I was giving my life away for four years. It was really, really hard being apart

  • from Jun. I suffered from really bad depression and extreme anxiety. At the worst, before

  • they finally found the right medicine for me I was having panic attacks every single

  • day. They damaged my heart, and that kind of sucks! I need this for the rest of my life.

  • I don't like that that happened. There are a lot of small things about the military that

  • can just drive you crazy. I hate ancillary training. I hate unit PT. I hate the uniform!

  • Why can't they make a uniform for my size? I'm a very thin person. They don't make uniforms

  • for thin women. My uniform was like this: I looked like a block. I can't have these

  • bangs. My hair's pulled back behind my head in a bun. You can't wear a lot of makeup.

  • I looked ridiculous and I hated it. So when I wasn't working, I started wearing a lot

  • of makeup. I started wearing dresses and heels everywhere. And so that's why in a lot of

  • my videos you've seen me with really feminine styles and stuff: because I was tired of looking

  • like a man five days out of the week. I just wanted to feel pretty. There are so many tiny

  • rules in the military. They pretty much control like everything. So if you're someone like

  • me and you need your independence, then the military is not for you. But I don't know

  • if I ever even would have gone to Japan, or if I ever would have met Jun, or if I ever

  • would have started doing videos, or if I ever would have developed this kind of self-confidence

  • where I can be in front of people and not like start crying. I don't know if I would

  • have been able to do that without the military. So, some good things did come of it. And I

  • mean, they paid for my school so that was kind of cool, too. I did really like a lot

  • of the people that I worked with. A lot of the people in the Air Force are really nerdy.

  • When I was doing my training to become an instructor, literally every single day in

  • that class someone brought up LARPing. A MSgt that I worked with gave me A Dance with Dragons,

  • the 5th book from Game of Thrones. I think my base had a DnD club? And so in the end

  • there were good things and there were bad things, and I don't really know how I feel

  • about it. All I know is I'm glad it's over. And I want to move on with my life now. So

  • I will answer questions that I can answer down in the comments here, but I'm not going

  • to talk about it in other videos. I'm not going to like, be bringing it up all the time

  • like, "You know, back when I was in the military-" So... that's it. That's what my job was. You

  • can ask me all your questions now down in the comments, like, "How many babies did you

  • kill?" Looking forward to it. And no, I never did go to an active war zone or anything like

  • that. Like I said, I had that heart condition so I was pretty medically limited throughout

  • a lot of my contract. And for those of you who might have been thinking about saying

  • it, please don't thank me for my service. I didn't do anything. It was just a job. It's

  • a little uncomfortable being thanked for something that doesn't deserve thanks, so. Well, thanks

  • for watching all this way! I think you guys know a lot more about me now. And I'll see

  • you next time! Bye!

Hey guys! So you guys have been asking me for forever what my job was because most of

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A2 BEG US military jun air force officer contract korea

My (previous) job, answering all your questions

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