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  • Hello and welcome everyone. This is Minoo at Anglo-Link. Today, we're going to look at

  • some differences in American English and British English pronunciation.

  • In order to do that, I've teamed up with my American colleague Rachel,

  • who is going to introduce herself to you now.

  • I'm Rachel and I have a YouTube channel called 'Rachel's English'.

  • My channel focuses on American English pronunciation.

  • There are videos that go over the specific mouth proposition for each sound,

  • videos that focus on the rhythm of American English, linking,

  • and videos that show you how to listen to the characteristics of American English.

  • There are over two hundred and fifty videos with two added each week. I hope

  • you'll check them out.

  • Thank you Rachel.

  • Okay, I will be focusing on the differences between consonants

  • 'r' and 't'

  • and also some very common words that are pronounced differently in American English and British English.

  • Rachel will be focusing on the differences between some vowel sounds.

  • Let's start with the letter 'r'.

  • When the letter 'r' is in the initial position of a word or in the middle of a word,

  • there isn't a huge difference between the way Americans or British people

  • pronounce it. However,

  • listen to me saying

  • the following four words and then listen to Rachel saying them.

  • Now, when the letter 'r'

  • is in the middle position

  • in a monosyllabic word and after a vowel,

  • in British English

  • we tend to drop it.

  • We also drop the letter 'r' at the end of words in British English,

  • whereas in American English, there is no difference.

  • Now, I'd like you to listen to me saying the following words

  • and then listen to Rachel saying the same word immediately.

  • Right then, let's move on to the letter 't'.

  • In standard British English,

  • the letter 't' is always pronounced as a /t/,

  • whether it is at the beginning of a word, in the middle of a word or

  • at the end of a word;

  • whether it's a stressed syllable or unstressed syllable.

  • For example, listen to these four words.

  • However, in American English

  • they tend to

  • drop the 't' in the final position.

  • So, now listen to Rachel saying these four words.

  • Now, listen to her

  • saying the words 'what' and 'cut' again.

  • Now, in American English, when the letter 't'

  • is in the middle position in a word,

  • it sometimes changes to a soft (d).

  • This happens

  • either when it's between two vowels

  • or

  • when it's between an 'r' and a vowel.

  • So, now listen to how I pronounce the following words,

  • and immediately to how Rachel pronounces them.

  • And finally, in American English,

  • the letter 't' is sometimes dropped after an 'n'.

  • For example,

  • in British English, we would say:

  • Now, listen to how Rachel pronounces them.

  • Okay, that's all for the consonants 'r' and 't'.

  • Now we're going to look at some very common words in English, that are

  • pronounced quite differently in British English and American English.

  • So, I'm going to say them and then you listen to how Rachel says.

  • Well, I hope you've enjoyed this part of the lesson.

  • To continue this lesson with Rachel, click here.

  • She will be telling you about the differences in vowel sounds.

  • If you want to subscribe to our channel, click here.

  • And if you want to subscribe to Rachel's Channel, click here.

  • Thank you for watching. I look forward to seeing you in our next video.

  • Bye now!

Hello and welcome everyone. This is Minoo at Anglo-Link. Today, we're going to look at

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A2 rachel american english british english british american letter

British vs American | English Pronunciation Lesson

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    Zenn posted on 2013/04/29
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