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  • We the people are being cajoled, fightened, and bullied into surrendering our democracy

  • and freedom. This film is a rallying cry.

  • We must fight for our independence - for the right to determine ourselves the laws under

  • which we live, and for the freedom to shape our own future.

  • This is the most important voting decision that any of us is gonna make in our lifetime.

  • With general elections it doesn’t really matter who you vote for, Conservative or Labour,

  • because you know that in four yearstime you can change your mind. This time you can’t

  • change your mind, this time is for keeps.

  • In this film well see how the EU works It’s like heaven for the politician or bureaucrat,

  • because it’s power without accountability. It was devised to make sure that the great

  • mass of the people could not control government, ever again.

  • The EU is turning into a dictatorship- this is not overstating it.

  • We will see what the EU had done to Britain.

  • The EU has just obliterated the English fishing industry altogether.

  • The European policies that we face are really the single biggest threat to our competitiveness.

  • Well see why fortress Europe has been such a calamity for the European economy

  • What we see is the EU bringing up the drawbridge

  • The European Union has become an economic basket case.

  • Certainly it is not in our economic interests to remain within the European Union - no way

  • We will look at the risks of tying our fate the failing EU.

  • Extremism at both ends is being fostered by the anti-democratic nature of the European Union.

  • Far from it being safer for us to be in the

  • EU there are dangers that go along with us being members of the EU being dragged into

  • situations we don’t want to get in. And we look at how independence could transform

  • Britain We have huge, huge scope for creating vast

  • number of new jobs Outside of Europe we could have prosperity

  • on a level that we can’t even imagine now. We are being asked to give up the right to

  • govern ourselves. What we are being offered in return. That could possibly be worth it?

  • It just shows utter contempt for what they think people are like, because they really

  • do believe that these little trinkets are going to buy us off.

  • What really matters is that you should have the power to remove the people who govern you.

  • Were about to choose how we wish to live our lives.

  • This is the single most important political decision any of us will make in our lifetime.

  • It’s been more than 40 years since we were last asked. It could be half a century before

  • were asked again, if were ever asked at all.

  • I think this is the last chance that well be able to vote on EU membership when we still

  • have a recognizable identity as Britons, and what makes it scary is that if we go the wrong

  • way, were in it for certainly my lifetime and probably my kidslifetime.

  • I’m on my way to Brussels to better understand the deal that’s on offer:

  • This is about our ability to say to ourselves that we are a genuinely democratic and free

  • people. That’s how important this is. In return for our democratic rights weve

  • been promised prosperity and security. Are these promises convincing?

  • The choice before us is all about democracy, and how highly we value it.

  • The worddemocracycomes from the ancient Greek. The demos is the people. The people

  • are meant to be in charge, not politicians or bureaucrats. Theyre meant to serve us,

  • not rule us. We have given them some power, but only temporarily, and we can take it away

  • from them if they displease us. That’s the theory.

  • Uh, the EU, s’il vous plait.

  • Straight off there’s a snag. On my quest to understand the EU, my first challenge is

  • to find it. There are over 90 EU buildings here in Brussels,

  • and load more Strasbourg and Luxembourg. As impressive as the modernist buildings is the

  • number of directorates, councils, commission and ministries which occupy them.

  • But here, the EU slips its first cog. For a democracy to function, there needs to be

  • transparency. We the people need to know how the system works.

  • People might not understand exactly how the functions of the British constitution work,

  • but they get the gist of it. Once every five years, we go down the school hall or to a

  • church, we put a cross in a ballot paper, theyre all counted up and the chap with

  • the most votes wins. We get that. You try working out how a European Commissioner is

  • appointed. It’s positively Kafka-esque. You can’t actually get your head around

  • who does what, why and who is answerable to who.

  • The European Union, which imposes laws on 28 countries, is made up of 7 main institutions,

  • which include the European Council, the Council of the European Union, the Court of Justice

  • of the European Union, the European Commission and the European Parliament.

  • Do you know the difference between the European Council, the Council of the European Union

  • and the Council of Europe? It’s a very good question.

  • *European parliament translator chatter* Tell me how many presidents there are in the

  • European Union. How many presidents?

  • Yeah. I’d guess at one.

  • There’s two presidents for goodness sake, I don’t know what the difference between

  • the two- -Four

  • -presidents is, there’s four presidents you say?

  • There are squads of committees and presidents of this and commissioners of that.

  • The expression I really hate ispooled sovereignty’. It’s bollocks- the people

  • of Slovenia have no more idea than the people of the UK and the people of Sweden or the

  • people of Spain what in fact is going on. I wouldn’t profess to understand the detail

  • of how it all works and I think part of that is deliberate.

  • One side knows, if one side is a priesthood and knows how it all works and the rest of

  • us ordinary citizens don’t know how it works, a massive transfer of power takes place.

  • It was devised to make sure that the great mass of the people could not control government

  • ever again.

  • Problem #2: for a democracy to work/ function?, you need to know who’s running it.

  • A democracy only works if you know who your representatives are.

  • David Cameron? Toff, tries to hide it, probably quite a nasty piece of work. Tony Blair: oily,

  • if there’s only room for 1 in the life boat: Tony Blair.

  • The ordinary voter, who’s gonna hand them all this power, can make up their mind whether

  • they like them, dislike them, ‘cause they see them in the papers, they hear them on

  • the radio, they watch them on the telly. Do you recognise this man?

  • No Do you recognise that man?

  • No I challenge you to name almost any of them.

  • Do you recognize this guy? No.

  • Well, there’s that chap Juncker, is he one of them?

  • I didn’t know whether it was just the British being a bit thick, so I thought I’d ask

  • some folk in Brussels. Ah yeah, uh, that’s uh, oh

  • MartinMartin?? Martin Sch

  • Can you tell who that is? No

  • No No

  • Who are all of these eurocrats? Who are they answerable to?

  • Ah but here we come to Problem #3: Accountability. Would it help if you knew who they werebecause

  • you don’t have any power over them, so what’s the point?

  • In the EU there’s a thing called a parliament, but it’s not a parliament in the sense that

  • we know it. In the EU, the parliament isn’t in charge.

  • Have you ever known anyone know who their MEP is? Nobody does. It’s because we know

  • that theyre not actually being voted into a meaningful position of law making.

  • This is the only parliament the world’s ever invented where you cannot initiate legislation,

  • propose legislation or even the repeal of legislation. All of that comes from the unelected

  • European Commission. So you can’t propose a law and try and get

  • it passed? No, absolutely not.

  • With parliamentary democracy, once every five years you can throw everything out the window

  • and start again, with this, once something is European law there is nothing through the

  • democratic process the voter can do to change it.

  • The people whom we elect to go to Brussels have almost no power at all. They do what

  • theyre told. Theyve got even less power than the House

  • of Lords for goodness sake. Our votes for these people are pointless.

  • They are fundamentally pointless. The European parliament is an irrelevance.

  • The European Union bureaucratic structures who are appointed not elected have all the

  • real power. The real power in the EU, including the power

  • to legislate resides not with the parliament but with EU officials.

  • They debate their laws in secret. We are not allowed to hear or read their deliberations.

  • Do you know the name of Britain’s European Commissioner?

  • No

  • Have you heard of Jonathan Hill?

  • No.

  • No.

  • No.

  • Did you vote for him?

  • Did I vote for him?

  • No

  • (laughs) No.

  • The curious thing is that only last year we

  • were celebrating the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, the founding charter of English

  • Freedom. The history of democracy in Britain has been the history of taxpayers demanding

  • the right to determine themselves how much tax should be taken from them, and how it

  • should be spent. If I’m going to be asked to pay taxes, I

  • want to be told where theyre going, and if theyre spent badly or stupidly, I want

  • to be able to remove from power the people who are spending them.

  • What made Britain rather different from most other countries was that at an early stage

  • we said that no government could pass any law or impose any tax without first getting

  • the authority of the British people. So it’s a major thing that we can be taxed by other

  • people without our say. We are now subjects of a vastly complex state

  • machine, run by anonymous officials who we didn’t elect, but who have the power to

  • impose on us laws that we haven’t debated and have no democratic means of repealing.

  • People who say to you that the European Union is undemocratic fundamentally misunderstand

  • the European Union: It is anti-democratic.

  • But to EU officials and politicians

  • It's like a warm bath.

  • It’s like heaven for the politician or bureaucrat, because it’s power without accountability.

  • The reason why all the major political parties are massively in favour of Europe, is because

  • when their careers are blown out of the water heretheyre stumbling around for a

  • jobno commercial organisation is going to hire them. They know what a collection

  • of shits they arethere’s only one place that will hire them.

  • They can get a job there which gives them a freedom not to have to face the electorate.

  • It’s extremely well paid, it’s more or less permanent, they don’t have any constituents

  • and they don’t have any worry about being thrown out at elections

  • So they saystay with the European Project, I’ll be making myself two, three hundred

  • grand a year, itll be fantastic, and at the end of it I get a peerage, it’s great.’

  • Since theyre not directly accountable to the taxpaying public, EU politicians and bureaucrats

  • have understandably been more than generous to themselves in pay and perks. This is the

  • much talked-about Brussels gravy train, and here’s my handy guide:

  • This is the shopping centre But this is all for politicians and bureaucrats

  • - it's not for members of the public No

  • So you get your own hair salon, and your nail bar

  • - get your nails done There's a sauna, there's a massage parlor

  • here as well Yeah

  • Why would they not want to stay here, living a life of luxury?

  • There are a number of people here who are paid more than the British prime minister.

  • Ah, you might say, but how many? Four? Ten? A hundred? Ten thousand. There are ten thousand

  • people here paid more than David Cameron, that’s 1 in 5 of everyone who works for

  • the EU. If youre an EU official, There’s the

  • relocation allowance, the household allowance, the family allowance, the entertainment allowance

  • , the private healthcare allowance , the private education for your kids allowance . The healthcare

  • allowance includes free Viagra - you would have thought would come under entertainment….

  • If youre an MEP you get an extra 250 pounds a day for being good enough to turn up , another

  • 41,000 pounds a year on top of that to cover phone bills and computers, and another 225,000

  • pounds a year on top of that to cover staffing costs , which in years gone by often meant

  • spouse or children. To cap it all theyve decided to charge

  • themselves a special low rate of tax.

  • But it’s not just officials and politicians who benefit

  • The EU also diverts rivers of taxpayerscash to the tax-munching middle class intelligentsia

  • in our sprawling publicly funded establishment. The European Union is very good at purchasing

  • the loyalty of powerful and articulate interests in all the member states

  • When we hear the heads of great public institutions, quangos, museums, campaign groups, waxing

  • lyrical about the EU, we have to remember, the EU gives them vast amounts of our money.

  • The EU gives shed loads of our money to local authorities and to universities and to art

  • groups and opera companies. And that then provides this chorus of noise

  • in favour of the European project. Every charity over a certain size is getting

  • money from Brussels, every NGO. We see EU largess effectively buying opinion.

  • You know what we see here is really a racket, it’s become a very good way of taking money

  • from the general population and handing it to people who are lucky enough to be working

  • for the system. The EU likes to advertise it’s generosity,

  • here in the North East for example. “European Union investing in your future”,

  • isn’t that good of them! I wonder where they got the money?

  • The SAGE arts centre at Gateshead were often reminded was built with the help of

  • EU money But what youre not told is that if you

  • live in the North East for every £1 that comes from the EU you have to pay the EU £2.30

  • in tax

  • But that’s not the only price the Geordies have paid for EU membership. I’m heading

  • down the river to the mouth of the Tyne The reward for giving up our sovereignty,

  • were told is greater influence in Europe. To see how much influence we have I’ve come

  • to the place I grew up. For centuries fisherman’s huts called Shields

  • lined the River Tyne, from them came the names of the towns that straddled the mouth of the

  • river, North and South Shields. The seas here are rough but the water’s rich

  • in mackerel haddock , salmon , herring , cod , skate , and shrimp.

  • By the early 20th Century 14 thousand tonnes of fish a year was being landed here at North

  • Shields. There is a daily fish auction here still,

  • in a building part-funded by the EU.

  • 24 in, 25, 25 pounds…30 pounds, 31, 31, 32…37 pounds

  • In a corner of one of the halls sits fewer than a hundred boxes part filled with fish,

  • a dozen or so fishermen and merchants surround them.

  • 74 year old fish merchant John Ellis has been buying at this auction since the 1950s

  • When I started working down here there was about 200 firms working on the quay, there

  • was haulage firms on the quay who had 30 and 40 wagons that used to ship the fish away.

  • And how many boxes would there be in the market then?

  • In them days there’d be…..8, 10, 12 and then you’d get also-

  • Martin: -twelve- - thousand-

  • -twelve thousand boxes a day- -so a different place

  • -Oh, you couldn’t get moved. Now this, well I think the average for the year would just

  • be about two hundred boxes a day , so it’s practically nothing isn’t it?

  • When Britain joined the common market it lost control of its fishing grounds.

  • When quotas were imposed several other European countries lobbied the EU for Britain’s fishing

  • rights to be divided up between them. The British government was powerless to stop this.

  • The EU has just obliterated the English fishing industry altogether. The quota system theyve

  • got now is just , it’s just mad. Local fisherman were now banned from fishing

  • in waters they’d fished successfully for centuries.