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  • Mm, mm, eating.

  • New Orleans is a gourmand's dream. Oh, and I'm so hungr-...

  • Hi. James from engVid. I'm hungry, and I'm thinking about eating, and I'm sure you do,

  • too. After all, eating is a natural thing. But in your experience of what you've been

  • taught, I'm sure you've been told words like: "delicious", "eating", and that's about it.

  • Hey, the world's a big place and a rich place, so why don't we give you a rich vocabulary

  • and give you, you know, some native-speaker speak on eating. Are you ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • So, I'm looking at a book. I'll say... Oh, what's this? "Time to pig out, Mr. E? It's

  • not time to scarf down pizza and beer. We've got work to do." I'm sure you're going: "Scarf?

  • Why 'scarf'?" We'll find out. On the board, we have: "How to talk about eating". Simple

  • enough. Chew, swallow. No, not so simple. Like, in every country, there's a way to speak

  • about things, and I want to give you a good... Good introduction to our eating lexicon, which

  • is dictionary. We're going to go from a little to a lot. And I'll give you the words that

  • we might use, and explain each one, and you'll notice there are some pictures here, so I

  • will give you the number with each picture. Some won't have pictures, but hey,

  • that's life. Suck it up, baby.

  • So the first one: "nibble". I want you to imagine a mouse.

  • [Nibbles]

  • Do mice eat a lot?

  • No. They eat a little bit, just a little food. Okay? Now, "nibble" can be a noun as in the

  • amount of food you eat, or verb, and it means to eat just a little bit. Okay? And that's

  • our first one. "Nibble". Think of a mouse. A mouse nibbles its food; has a little bit

  • of food.

  • "Graze" is number two. "Grazing" is funny. You kind of eat a lot, but you don't. Huh?

  • Well, when you graze, think of cows. You see the cow: "Moo", it's moving through,

  • [eating noises]; moves over here,

  • [eating noises] moves over here.

  • It eats a little bit of everything,

  • or as I like to say, when I go to people's houses and I don't know if the food is good,

  • I just graze. I try a little, [eating noises], and I move on. Try a little, I move on. I

  • might stay in a place where I like that. Okay? Cows graze. Funny enough, men don't really

  • graze. Women graze more than men. They do it because they eat, they go:

  • "I'm having fun, I'm enjoying myself. I'm going to try this, this, this, this, this."

  • Men just want to, boom, gulp it down. So, to graze is to move and eat a little bit of food at a time.

  • We usually do this at buffets or with foods we're not sure of, like, I'm just going to

  • graze a bit. Okay? You see the cow? That's Bessie, graze. So, when you see people eating

  • a little bit of food, and moving around, and keep coming back to the same food - they're

  • grazing. Not really eating.

  • Numero uno. Uno? Did I say "uno"? See, I don't speak Spanish. That's why I shouldn't.

  • Number three: "bite". You know a bite as, here? Yeah. Easy. Right. Oh, sorry, I should say "graze"

  • is a verb before I forget, there. "Graze", a verb. "Bite", a bite. Now, notice a bite

  • is singular in this case. "A bite" is interesting because it's a medium amount of food, and

  • it's a noun. When you go for a bite, you want some food. When we talk about "nibble", I

  • said cheese, I should have actually said: "Think nibbling as on peanuts, chips maybe,

  • a cookie or two". I just want to nibble; not a lot of food. Remember the noun? When you

  • go for a bite to eat, you want something like a hot dog. You go:

  • "Okay, I get it." No, no, you don't get it. I want just a hot dog,

  • or I want a slice of pizza, or I want a hamburger,

  • but I don't want a salad, I don't want dessert, I just want something more than a nibble,

  • more than chips, but not a full meal. I'm not... I don't have the time or I'm not that

  • hungry. So when you go for a bite, some people might go... They won't even go for a doughnut,

  • like a doughnut would be something to nibble on or just eat, but a bite would be a hamburger,

  • hot dog, something like that. Big, but not too big, because it's a medium amount of food.

  • All right? So, I'm going to go for a bite. And look here, there's a mouth. There you

  • go. "Bite". Don't forget to get a bite. Okay? I might even say as an idiom:

  • "I'm going out for a bite. Do you want something?" If you go: "Yeah, give me a salad, plus this", I go:

  • "Dude, I'm going for a bite. You want a meal, go by yourself. That's way too much food."

  • Number four: "munch". "Munch"? Well, "munch". It sounds like something, right? Think of

  • a Coke can, when you crush it, [crunching sound] it makes a sound. "Crunch", "munch".

  • "M" stands for "middle". Munching is like nibble, but you have a bit more food. So,

  • nibbling is a small amount of food for a mouse. When you're munching on something... Here's

  • the thing about munching: First, it's not going to be one little thing. It might be

  • a few carrots and some celery. But here's what's going to get to you [crunching noise].

  • You know: "Man, I can hear that guy munching from all the way over here." It's sound. Munch

  • and crunch, think crunch the can, munch with your mouth - you hear the sound from over

  • there. Usually makes you upset. Okay? So, when somebody's munching on something, you'll

  • go: "What is he munching on?" How do you know? You can hear it. So, crunch the can, sound;

  • munch with a mouth. And it won't be two or three peanuts; it'll be more. Okay? So, "munch"

  • for medium and sound.

  • "Rumbling". At night, sometimes it's raining or in the day, and thunder and lightning-right?-comes down.

  • So there's a big sound. Have you ever sat down in a room from somebody, like E right

  • now, and you go [Rumbles], and you're like: "Is there somebody in there?" You say:

  • "My stomach's rumbling because I'm very hungry." We're now moving from medium to more, like

  • you're more than just hungry. You're not a little hungry; you're almost getting very

  • hungry. So your tummy starts to rumble or your stomach. "Tummy" is for children and

  • ladies: "My tummy's rumbling". "Stomach" is for men who are macho people. "Stomach's rumbling."

  • It means: I'm hungry, it's making sounds. Okay? So, if you see this... Here we go. "Rumbling",

  • think of thunder, that big noise. Right? "Rumbling".

  • "Scarf". Look at E. E is eating a pizza and drinking beer. The whole meal cost him $2.

  • Trust me, you don't want $2 pizza and beer. It'll make you sick, but it's very cheap.

  • It's inexpensive; not a lot of money. "Scarf it down." Imagine a scarf, you know, in the

  • winter in Canada, we wear scarves to keep our necks warm. When you scarf something down,

  • you take the food, [eating noises], and you just take it right down, right down your throat.

  • The throat and the neck are in the same area. It means sometimes you don't even swallow,

  • or chew. Where's my word "chew"? See? We munch. We look at scarfing, "scarfing", and these

  • words here, no "chewing". Chewing's with your teeth. When you scarf down the pizza, usually

  • you'll just: "[Eating noises]". You go: "Man, you didn't even chew your food. You just swallowed,

  • like a snake." [Laughs] You're like: "Yeah, I did." Right? So, when you scarf it down,

  • we sometimes don't even chew the food, and it's usually cheap. So, "scarfing"... Hmm.

  • This is interesting. You can say: "I was scar-... I scarfed down the pizza." That's okay. It

  • tells me you were very hungry, and you ate or drank very quickly.

  • If you say: "Mr. E scarfed down the food", I think he's an animal.

  • It's not a compliment. You go: "He's scarfing down that food." You're saying: He's acting in a way

  • that might send him to the hospital. Right?

  • See? E, told ya, don't scarf that food. Cheap beer and pizza will get you in trouble.

  • Right? So no scarfing. Scarfing is not good. Okay? Chew your food. Remember "chew"?

  • Very good. All right.

  • "Scarf" and "devour". "Devour" means to eat something completely. So that arrow was in

  • the wrong place, so when we go here, leaving nothing. "Scarfing" and "devouring" are almost

  • the same. Do you want to know the big difference? Yeah. When you devour something, you're saying

  • two things: A) it is delicious, and B) is that it's expensive. If somebody says to me:

  • "Hey, I devoured that cake." Cake is sweet and nice, it's delicious. It makes sense why

  • you would devour the cake. If you said you scarfed it, I would think you were eating

  • it in a hurry. So, generally, you'll hear...

  • Here's a perfect example: "I went to a cheap pizza place the other night and I, you know...

  • I ate... I scarfed down a pizza and some beer. It was like 10 bucks."

  • You will never hear that same person say this: "I went to a fancy Italian restaurant the other day. The pasta

  • was divine. I devoured it." That's what they'll say. They'll never say: "The pasta was divine.

  • I scarfed it down." Anybody hearing that who speaks English is like: "[Laughs]. What's

  • wrong with that guy?" So am I saying money makes a difference? Well, it's really about

  • if it's expensive and it tastes really good or it tastes good, we'll say "devoured". You

  • devour your mother's food; you don't scarf it down. If you scarf it down it's because

  • you have to run out of there, but you would never say: "Mom, I'm scarfing your dinner."

  • It's not polite. But if you're in a pizza joint, or eating a hamburger or a hot dog

  • off the street: "I scarfed it down. I was starving." Everybody understands. The other

  • thing is "scarf" is usually used by younger people, teenagers and that. Okay? Cool, so

  • we've got "scarf" and "devour" and we're on the "a lot". We're eating a lot, now.

  • "Starving". You usually scarf food down and devour it because you are starving. What does

  • "starving" mean? You know "hungry": "I'm hungry", "I'm a little hungry", "I'm very hungry".

  • Starving is this: "Food, now!" No conversation. Food, gone. That's why I scarfed it or I devoured

  • it because I need food now. All right? So, you got "hungry" we already know, then we're

  • going to give you a new one, "starving", which means: "I'm so hungry, I don't want to talk,

  • give me my damn food now." Are we good? I think we've almost done all of these. Right, E?

  • "Time to pig out!" Well, wait a second. I just want to do something before we go there.

  • Okay? So it's not time to pig out now. Chill with your cheap beer.

  • "Gulp", "swallow", "spit". You'll notice I have on the board, here, "eat" and "drink".

  • I want to do "drink" a little later, but today we're going to finish off with there are some

  • words that you can eat and drink, and we use the same words or verbs with them. Okay? By

  • the way, this is called a Venn diagram, and it shows you what is common. And these are common.

  • A "gulp", if you have a drink of something, and you [gulps], that's a gulp. You can also

  • gulp down your food. If you're gulping the food, you're probably not chewing. You're

  • probably, [gulps], gulping it down. You take air in with the food you gulp. Sometimes you

  • [burps] when you're done, which is called a "burp", because you gulped, took in too

  • much air with the food. "Swallow" is this, down my throat, [swallows]. You take medicine,

  • [swallows], you swallow, and that's to put it down. And "spit" is this, [spits], spit out.

  • Give you a great example before we go to the next board.

  • Mr. E, one night we're out, we're partying. Mr. E finished drinking and he couldn't find a place to pee,

  • so he peed in a bottle,

  • and put it in the fridge. I don't know why. I don't know why he did it. Anyway, I woke

  • up the next morning, went to the fridge, took out the I thought water-[Laughs] It was really

  • pee-and I gulped it down. But before I could swallow it, I knew it was pee, so I, [spits],

  • spat or spit... "Spat" is the past of "spit". I was spitting it out.

  • "E, what is wrong with you!?"

  • No, it's still not time to pig out. End of the story? I don't think so.

  • All righty, then. We are going to go through just a couple of... Well, I did eating and

  • I gave you things like "chew", and "swallow", and whatnot. Just for some fun, I mean, it's

  • a little bit extra, just want to give you through some animal idioms for eating, because

  • when we eat, we are animals after all, but we usually tend to use the animals to emphasize

  • what we think. "Emphasize" means make stronger of what's going on. So I gave you five of

  • them just to play with for a little bit, and we've got a bird, and we've got a dog. I stopped

  • drawing because, really, I'm not good at it. But I got a dog... If you're going:

  • "What is that? It looks like a turd." Don't ask me what a turd is, okay? Yeah, that's a turd

  • with legs. The pig looks like my sis-...

  • No, it doesn't look my sister. I love you. I'm not even going to say her name.

  • A bird, a horse, and a wolf. A wolf is like a big dog,

  • in case you don't know what it is, it's like a dog that's not been domesticated. That's

  • not a wolf or... It, it's just... The idea is think of dog. All right.

  • So let's start small. "Eat like a bird". This one is actually what we call an oxymoron.

  • "Oxymoron" means the two words really don't really go together,

  • because birds are supposed

  • to, you know, eat like a bird. Birds are small, not eat a lot. In reality, they eat a lot.

  • But when we say someone eats like a bird, we mean they don't really eat. Maybe one cookie,

  • one peanut. Not very much. They eat like a bird, that's why they're so slim. Okay?

  • The opposite of eating like a bird is to "pig out", dude. E's gone, but E was wanting to

  • pig out. He wanted to eat, eat, eat, eat like a pig. Pigs are known to eat anything, and

  • eat a lot, and eat all the time. So if you're a bird, you don't eat a lot of food. If you're

  • a pig, you eat all the time. If you "make a pig of yourself", it means you are embarrassing

  • yourself because you're eating so much that now people are looking at you and staring.

  • They might even charge money to watch the animal eat the food. So don't make a pig of

  • yourself. Okay? So, you know, two, three slices, okay; 10, 20, problem.

  • "Dog's breakfast". If you have a dog, I don't need to explain; if you don't have a dog,

  • I will. Dogs are not known for being very tidy or neat eaters. You know, they don't

  • cut their food and eat slowly; it's all over the place. So when somebody tells you:

  • "It looks like a dog's breakfast", it's very messy, very disorganized. Okay?

  • Horse. When you "eat like a horse", it means to eat a lot of food. It's similar to pigging

  • out. There is a difference. When you eat like a bird or eat like a horse, they're exact

  • opposites. You eat like a horse, you eat all the time, you like to eat a lot. You're a

  • very good eater, let's say. When you eat like a bird, you don't eat a lot of food all the

  • time. Okay? So those... That's what that means.

  • Now, so we got these two as being opposite. Right? "Eat like a bird" and "eat like a horse".

  • When I say "pig out" it's because you're eating... Maybe one time you're eating like this. Sorry,

  • I forgot to put "dog's breakfast", because the breakfast belongs to the dog. Sometimes

  • I forget that. But yeah, "pigging out", you're going to say: "Aren't they the same?" I go:

  • "No." These two are like normal behaviours. You "eat like a bird", you don't eat a lot

  • all the time. "Eat like a horse", you eat a lot all the time. When you "pig out", it's

  • maybe a one-time thing. Tonight I'm going to pig out on spare ribs. I don't always eat

  • a lot, but I'm going to eat... Pig out now. When I "make a pig of myself", I'm making

  • it embarrassing. I'm eating so much, there's rib juice, it's all on my face, on my hair.

  • It's embarrassing. "Dog's breakfast" is when it looks bad, like you put the food down,

  • you're like: "Ughl. That looks like a dog's breakfast." It's not good to look at. Okay?

  • "Wolf down". See how we got dogs and wolf? I don't know why. "Wolf down", remember we

  • talked about swallowing and gulping? When you wolf it down, you don't chew, you're like

  • [eating noises], you're wolfing it down, [growls], like a savage animal. [Laughs] All right?

  • So we got a cool, few animal idioms you can spring on your friends now. All right?

  • -"I eat like a bird, that's why I look so good." -"I'm always working out, so I have to eat like a horse." Okay?

  • How about a quiz? Because you know we have a big quiz, but I want you to do this quiz

  • first and see what you've learned. All right?

  • So the first one we want to do is this:

  • "I was at an excellent Italian restaurant and I __________ the meal."

  • Did I mention: "excellent" also means "expensive"?

  • Hopefully that helps you.

  • That's right, you got it:

  • "I devoured". "Devoured" it, yeah.

  • "Devoured the meal". Okay? You devoured the meal.

  • What about this one:

  • "We were at a cheap pizza joint and I _______ _______ a whole pizza."

  • Hmm. It's not winter,

  • but I sure could use something if I was cold.

  • I'll give you a hint.

  • I knew you'd get it.

  • "Scarfed down". Remember we talked about scarfing down pizza and beer

  • from cheap places? Because this one is no

  • money; that's a lot of money. There's