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  • Our penultimate program of the academic year kicks off right now. I'm Carl Azuz, it's good to

  • see you this Thursday. First up, a new clue in the mysterious disappearance of a passenger plane

  • over the Mediterranean Sea. Egypt air flight 804 vanished on May 19th. Several countries have been

  • involved in the search for the plane, but so far, they've found only debris. There've been more questions

  • than answers. Yesterday, though, investigators said that a French Navy ship detected signals

  • from one of the plane's flight data recorders with information about the plane's airspeed, altitude,

  • engine status, and wing positions. The so called Black Box could hold the answers as to what exactly

  • caused the aircraft to crash. And it helps investigators narrow down the area of the Mediterranean

  • where they're searching. But the flight recorders only give out signals for about 30 days after they get wet,

  • so officials are in a race against time.

  • This is a huge breakthrough in the investigation of Egypt Air flight 804. Which two weeks ago was

  • traveling from Paris to Cairo when it disappeared from radar. There had been a massive search

  • underway. Pieces of debris have been recovered as well as body parts. It was the French naval ship

  • Laplace which located the signal from one of the black boxes, they haven't been able to locate the other

  • black box yet. Another ship will be coming within a week which has sophisticated means to recover the

  • wreckage from the sea floor which could be at depths of 3, 000 meters, that's 10, 000 feet. Once those

  • black boxes are recovered they will be analyzed. Hopefully, they haven't been damaged by the crash.

  • And, once they are analyzed, here in Cairo, investigators hope it will give them some insight into

  • what exactly happened on that plane. They're also hoping that, with the recovery of the black boxes they'll

  • be able to recover the fuselage, another clue, another piece of evidence which will help investigators.

  • Also for the families. 66 people died in this crash. The families are hoping this news will also help in

  • retrieving their loved ones so they can give them a proper burial. Ian Lee in Cairo.

  • US State Department, which oversees the country's foreign affairs, is warning Americans about

  • traveling to Europe. It says the large number of tourists who visit the continent over the summer could

  • possibly be targets for terrorists, especially at large public events. We reported earlier this week

  • how terrorists are trying to sneak into Europe among the scores of migrants and refugees going there.

  • And a French intelligence official recently told CNN that police don't think they've arrested everyone

  • involved in recent terrorist attacks in Paris, France, and Brussels, Belgium. Well, the US State Department

  • has made it clear that this latest alert is not in response to a new or specific threat, but rather a more

  • general warning to US citizens travelling in Europe about the potential for a terrorist attack on the

  • continent. It names some big events, specifically including the Tour De France,

  • The Catholic Church's World Youth Day in Poland,

  • as well as the European soccer championship in France known as EURO 2016.

  • Now EURO 2016 has been particularly an important one for French authorities considering intelligence

  • officials believe that may have been the original target of the terrorist cell behind the Brussels attacks.

  • And French authorities really taking no chances when it comes to security preparations for that, deploying

  • some 90, 000 security personnel just yesterday. At the Stade de France they held a security exercise, one

  • of dozens of exercises to be held throughout the country. Designed not only to get security personnel

  • ready for Euro 2016, but also to assuage the fears of the public. French authorities have expressed

  • confidence in their preparations, security wise. For not only the matches to be held in stadiums but also

  • the fan zone's large outdoor spaces where fans will be able to enjoy the matches as well. It's worth

  • mentioning that France is still under a state of emergency and that has been extended through Euro

  • 2016. The U. S. travel alert is expected to expire August, 31st. Erin McLaughlin, CNN Brussels.

  • Here we go with a quick check of three of the schools watching this Thursday and making a

  • Roll Call request at CNNStudentNews. com. Mendive Middle School leads things off for us.

  • They're working a little magic from the city of Sparks, the state of Nevada. From Prince George, Virginia,

  • a very royal welcome to the Royals of Prince George High School. And it's great to see our viewers

  • at Gomarus Scholengemeenschap. It's in the city of Gorinchem. Netherlands. Businesses, banks,

  • and governments are looking for a few good computer hackers. And by good, they mean certified,

  • ethical hackers. People paid to test and protect an organization's electronic information from the

  • kind of hackers who might be looking to steal it.

  • In the US, certified ethical hackers can eventually earn as much as $ 130, 000 per year. What do you think

  • of when I say the word hacker? Some creepy dude in a basement? Well, that's a misconception.

  • What if I told you that there's a class of hackers who don't just have social skills, they have more social

  • intelligence than anyone you'll ever meet. David Kennedy is one of them. He's what's known as a social

  • engineer or a people hacker. His craft is to dupe you into doing things things,

  • and sharing information you probably shouldn't.

  • Can I just get your credit card number?

  • Some use it for illegal activity. In David's case, companies pay him to find out if employees are leaving

  • the company vulnerable. He and his team show us how it's done. Step one, spoof his number so

  • it looks like he's calling from inside the company, and then call tech support.

  • Hello, are you there? Hello?

  • Hi, this is Ken. How may I help you?

  • I was wondering if you could take a look at a website I'm trying to get to. It's for a big customer

  • thing I'm working on for Monday, and I can't seem to get to the website from my computer.

  • Sure, what's the website? I'll see if I can get to it.

  • Thanks man, I really appreciate the help, I mean it could be a stupid thing. I really suck at computers,

  • so it's www. survey, that's S- U- R- V- E- Y- pro. . com?

  • Yeah, I got a prompt to open. I just clicked open and I'm at the site now.

  • Here's what the IT guy doesn't realize. By clicking that link, he's just given David full access to his computer.

  • Okay, that's weird. I just hit it and it works and it seems like it's working fine now. Awesome,

  • I don't know what you did man, but I really appreciate the help. Hey, no problem. That was easy.

  • That was it?

  • We're on his computer right now.

  • You were able to take over this guy's computer within, I would say like, under two minutes.

  • Under two minutes, yeah. Under two minutes, took over his entire computer, and think of it as not

  • just this computer, but it's pretty much the downfall of the entire company.

  • In this case the company was paying David to hack them and see if their employees would fall for it,

  • and they did. To show you this demo, we agreed not to use the company's name. Kennedy hacks to

  • protect. He's part of a growing number of hackers using this skill for good. Josh Corman's one of them, too.

  • He started a group to help bridge the gap between hackers and big companies.

  • Hacking is a form of power. Not surprisingly, if you walked into my house and saw all the Spiderman stuff,

  • I'm a big fan of the family line of with great power there comes great responsibility. We're coming to

  • a point where the outside world with a breach a week, a breach a day, affecting people's personal lives.

  • National security, we gotta grow up a bit. And we need to be very deliberate about how we use that power.

  • Corman formed the group after his mom passed away.

  • She was my science teacher. She kinda taught me that darkness is the absence of light. Cold is the

  • absence of heat. If you see something missing in the world, maybe it's our job to put it there.

  • I think the world's gonna be whatever we want it to be and whatever we make it. There are very

  • very bad people which means it falls to the good people to try to fight it.

  • You feel like you have a very personal responsibility.

  • We have so much potential to shape our culture, our values, our safety. If not us then who?

  • It's a question maybe not everyone's asked. How many hugs can someone give in a minute? And the answer,

  • 79. You can give 79 hugs in a minute. We know that thanks to this man in India along with the assistance

  • of a whole bunch of students. They wrapped their arms around a Guinness World Record defeating the

  • old hug high mark by two people. This is definitely quantity over quality and some squeezes were actually

  • disqualified because a genuine hug is defined by having both arms wrapped around another person.

  • But why be upset about that? They can always hug it out. They know they've tried to squeeze in

  • everyone they could in the hopes of class being the record. And now that they've clinched it, they truly

  • deserve a pat on the back. Because now that they've successfully embraced one challenge.

  • Maybe this is just the huginning. I'm Carl Azuz for CNN Student News.

Our penultimate program of the academic year kicks off right now. I'm Carl Azuz, it's good to

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