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  • ANNOUNCER: 'This is the BBC.'

  • WOMAN: 'We're back in the birthplace of a television phenomenon.'

  • It feels like only yesterday that I was working at TV Centre

  • on Doctor Who.

  • And what a role!

  • The Doctor's granddaughter.

  • 'The original.

  • 'When I walked through those doors 50 years ago, it would've been hard

  • 'to believe that the show would still be going strong now.

  • 'And to celebrate its anniversary, we're back,

  • 'filming An Adventure In Space And Time -

  • 'a drama about the show's remarkable beginnings. And it's something

  • 'writer Mark Gatiss has wanted to get off the ground for some time.'

  • MARK: I still can't quite believe it

  • because I first sort of pitched this idea about 13 years ago.

  • And then I tried very strongly to get it made for the 40th anniversary.

  • I'm delighted it's all come together for the 50th.

  • It has a sort of roundness to it

  • - which is very appealing. - ALL: Cheers!

  • CAROLE ANN: 'Mark was to kick-start An Adventure In Space And Time,

  • 'but it was a certain man I met in 1963

  • 'that was to get the ball rolling for Doctor Who itself.'

  • We find ourselves now in Sydney Newman's office

  • on the seventh floor of TV Centre.

  • Not the real one,

  • and I think probably a bit more swish than Sydney's office actually was.

  • One day, all this will be mine.

  • HE CHUCKLES

  • CAROLE ANN: 'Sydney Newman was the man

  • 'who brought together a dream team to put the show on the road.

  • 'And what a character!'

  • I'd first worked at the BBC in 1965. I was 19.

  • I met Sydney, very briefly, in the club.

  • Cos you could always tell Sydney in the club

  • because he was a very brightly coloured kind of personality

  • and literally wore cravats.

  • He wore waistcoats. He was very different.

  • 'I think Sydney really thought of himself as a movie mogul.'

  • And...action!

  • Fun. Fun. Have you heard of fun, Mervyn?

  • CAROLE ANN: 'And Sydney was making some ground-breaking appointments -

  • 'the BBC's very first female drama producer.

  • 'Verity Lambert.

  • 'And the world she was entering was a bit of a challenge.'

  • There's a line in the script where Verity says,

  • "It's a sea of fag smoke, tweed and sweaty men,"

  • 'which it clearly was.

  • 'And it was quite hard to penetrate, as a woman,

  • 'because no woman had ever done that before.'

  • - Can I help you? - I think you're in my office.

  • To research the role, I...

  • 'did YouTube her to see if there was any footage.

  • 'She was very composed, very classy,'

  • very warm,

  • 'but you could see a real steel there.'

  • Not old enough for the Doctor, surely?

  • CAROLE ANN: 'So, does Jessica feel she's anything like Verity herself?'

  • That would be very flattering, if anyone compared me to Verity Lambert.

  • That would be very nice.

  • CAROLE ANN: 'And despite opposition, Verity Lambert was to fight very hard

  • 'to have a distinguished, older actor play the role of the first Doctor.

  • 'William Hartnell.'

  • I just think he was one of the great character actors of British cinema.

  • Settle, please.

  • 'I think he felt rather typecast as authority figures, sergeant majors

  • 'or petty crooks. Doctor Who kind of released'

  • a kind of playfulness in him.

  • I think he felt that he was actually born to play the Doctor.

  • But he had very strong opinions about the way it should be done

  • and wouldn't take any kind of advice. Quite often,

  • because I was the smallest person, everybody around me was

  • taking the light from me, and he'd point this out.

  • So he looked after me. He was lovely.

  • Cut.

  • He was always giving you little tips,

  • like, "Don't make the gesture like that," he said.

  • "It'll be out of the camera.

  • "Make it here, you see?"

  • The whole thing about Bill was that he was so unpredictable.

  • There was this mystery about him. I miss that. I mean,

  • he remains the best Doctor Who for me...

  • quite naturally.

  • I can't imagine how I would've reacted

  • if someone had told me 50 years ago

  • 'that I'd be playing Doctor Who.

  • 'It's been one of those great jobs'

  • and, er, an experience I'll always remember.

  • It wasn't just the Doctor or my own character that was new in 1963.

  • I remember when I met another addition to the cast.

  • And 50 years on,

  • London is in for a bit of a treat as they're wheeled out yet again.

  • Today, we are recreating the famous Dalek invasion of Earth shot

  • of the Daleks parading across Westminster Bridge.

  • - This is a really iconic moment. - And...action, Daleks!

  • CAROLE ANN: 'Who would have thought that an egg whisk and a plunger

  • 'would have made such an impact?

  • 'But these design classics still have one big flaw.'

  • We've put in a bit where he's sort of veering off towards the kerb.

  • It was difficult then,

  • it's still difficult to manoeuvre the bloody things.

  • MARK CHUCKLES

  • It gives you an old-fashioned kind of thrill.

  • SIRENS WAIL

  • Doctor Who was started by a talented bunch of originals -

  • the flamboyant Sydney Newman and the remarkable Verity Lambert.

  • And they were joined by an Asian director,

  • the charismatic and ambitious Waris Hussein.

  • What is this?

  • What are we going to do with this?

  • Well, I play Waris Hussein, who was the first ever

  • 'director of Doctor Who.'

  • It's crazy.

  • Cavemen and disappearing bloody police boxes...

  • 'As soon as I got the part,'

  • I got in touch with Waris straightaway.

  • 'And our first meeting, actually, we were a bit kind of'

  • weird with each other.

  • 'He's looking at me going,

  • "You're watching everything I'm doing, aren't you?"

  • But, yeah, we hit it off straightaway.

  • WARIS: 'I said, "Look, play him as someone'

  • "who's anxious to get things right as a director,"

  • 'because that's what I wanted in those days.'

  • It'll never work.

  • "Play it with a great deal of 'What do I do with this?'

  • "Terrified because I don't know how to cope."

  • When do we start?

  • CAROLE ANN: 'It was quite a scary prospect for Sacha, playing Waris,

  • 'especially whilst the man himself was watching closely.'

  • At the read through, I think that's when I was most nervous.

  • 'He was hearing himself for the first time and he was sitting'

  • right behind me.

  • 'I was like, "Oh, this is scary." He started welling up'

  • and getting quite moved by it.

  • So I hope that was in a good way, not in a bad way.

  • 'But, yeah, I think he seemed happy.'

  • WARIS: 'I've never been played by anybody before. I'm looking forward'

  • to seeing myself portrayed when I do see the film.

  • MARK: The whole thing's been a labour of love for everybody.

  • Planet Vortis we did yesterday from The Web Planet.

  • It was conjured out of virtually nothing -

  • sand, and polystyrene rocks

  • and painted hardboard, and it looks absolutely beautiful.

  • Incredible, the attention to detail across the board.

  • CAROLE ANN: 'Mark is right about the attention to detail.

  • 'I was lucky enough to visit the set during filming, which I found to be

  • 'very emotional.

  • 'What really brought a lump to my throat is when'

  • we saw David Bradley

  • 'playing Bill.

  • 'They were showing that Bill occasionally forgot his lines.'

  • - We have no gloves...drugs. - And, er...

  • ..It was, it was difficult to watch it.

  • 'He certainly gets the essence of Bill beautifully.

  • 'It was clear from my visit that filming TV has changed a bit over

  • 'over the years,

  • 'and time-travelling back to 1963 was quite enjoyable for the cast.'

  • I think my favourite stuff is actually re-enacting the episode,

  • um, because she has

  • 'some cracking lines and it's really fun to do.'

  • What are you doing here?

  • JAMIE GLOVER: 'The world of television in 1963

  • 'seems a million miles away'

  • from the television that we work in now.

  • BELL RINGS OK. Into position, everyone.

  • 'They would rehearse it for a week

  • 'and then they'd shoot the episode, and they'd shoot'

  • like a half-an-hour episode in an hour-and-a-half.

  • 'When you go back and look at some of the earlier episodes, it's a bit

  • 'bumpy in places.'

  • Move the bloody camera.

  • Often, one actor's blocking the other,

  • or someone stumbles on their line.

  • Is that your excuse for this unwarrantable...

  • unwarranted intrusion?

  • You can see them sort off ploughing through.

  • I know this is absurd but...

  • CREAKING The doors!

  • 'There's a kind of live, exciting quality.'

  • That's something that, for good and bad, we've lost nowadays.

  • CAROLE ANN: 'But the cast and crew

  • 'were keen to get some of that live feel into the drama,

  • 'and were more than happy to record

  • 'some additional dialogue... 1963 style.'

  • Sorry about that.

  • I tried to make the thing work but it come off in me 'and.

  • - Punishment rations all round! - I only asked.

  • Gold!

  • CAROLE ANN: 'An Adventure In Space And Time is packed full of

  • 'references to Doctor Who's long history,

  • 'and Mark was keen to cast as many cameos as possible

  • 'from those connected to the show.'

  • We are at Verity Lambert's leaving party in 1965,

  • and we're very privileged to have

  • 'with us lots of faces from the programme, from the time.

  • AMERICAN ACCENT: This is a great party.

  • 'And the party continued with cameos from William Russell,

  • 'who played one of the Doctor's first companions, and Mark Eden,

  • 'who stepped into Marco Polo's shoes in the very first series.

  • 'And someone couldn't resist stepping into the shoes of the Doctor

  • 'for his own cameo.

  • 'Here's a little treat you won't have seen in the show itself.

  • 'Another regeneration.

  • 'Hope you enjoy.'

  • MARK: I don't know what it is about Doctor Who,

  • partly childhood nostalgia.

  • It's partly the fact that it instantly connects with

  • a very happy time for me and for hundreds of thousands of people.

  • CAROLE ANN: 'The Doctor has delighted audiences now for half a century,

  • 'and I'm sure we all hope that his adventure in space and time

  • 'will continue for quite a while longer.'

  • Well, like a great wine, you've survived a very long time.

  • Doctor Who, happy birthday.

  • I wish Doctor Who a very happy anniversary.

  • Here's to another 50 years of Daleks and weeping angels.

  • And who knows?

  • Maybe some people watching this will be watching in 50 years' time

  • to celebrate its 100th birthday.

  • I hope you're going when I have grandchildren.

  • And may you continue to travel

  • through time and space for the next 100 years.

  • Yeah, happy 50th anniversary. And here's to many more years to come.

  • I feel more like a dad than a director about this

  • because I was at the birth of this show.

  • And that makes me very proud.

  • I just want to say happy anniversary, Doctor Who.

  • May I say...on behalf of all the Doctor Whos...

  • ..happy anniversary. Happy 50th.

ANNOUNCER: 'This is the BBC.'

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Behind the scenes of An Adventure in Space and Time - Doctor Who 50th Anniversary - BBC

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    張瑜庭 posted on 2016/05/28
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