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  • Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is language of the senses,

  • and I made this lesson because I noticed that when you're using your language prospects

  • and things about... Things like that, to give... To express an opinion, it's always taught,

  • like, you say: "I think", "I think this because", or "I think that because". When I realized

  • that, in reality, we use... Our language is much broader, and we use a lot of different

  • phrases to express an opinion, basically; and I also realized that a lot of the language

  • we use is based on our senses. So, I'm going to share those phrases with you today, and

  • that will make your language and... When you're speaking English, it will make your language

  • much more rich and more expressive, basically.

  • And it also relates to NLP, which is a way of thinking about the communication between

  • us. What is successful communication? How can we be more successful as communicators?

  • And I don't want to go too much into it, except I'm going to look at the ideas... The idea

  • of communication styles. And according to NLP, each of us has a preferred communication

  • style, and it's based on our strongest sense, you could say,

  • and that means the way we interpret the world.

  • So, everybody has a way of interpreting the world, and we do that through our senses.

  • So, if you are somebody who's a strongly visual person, and that's your strongest sense, your

  • language will use lots of language that's visual, and we'll look at that. We'll give...

  • I'll give you some examples in a minute.

  • You might be an auditory person, this means that your strongest sense is your... What...

  • What comes to your ears, in which case, your language will be using terms that evoke a

  • sense of hearing and what you hear. You may also be a kinesthetic person. This means that

  • you interpret the world through your sense of touch and your feelings. I am a kinesthetic

  • person. If you listen to me speaking normally in my life with my friends and everything,

  • my language is always: "I feel", "I feel that because", where, really, I mean the same as:

  • "I think", but the term I use to express what I mean is "I feel". So maybe you're like me,

  • or you might be an auditory digital person. This is the kind of person... I didn't know

  • what symbol to write, here. This is a kind of person who interprets the world in a logical

  • way, according to systems and things like that,

  • so I put a little mathematical symbol there. I didn't know what else to put.

  • So, what we'll do now is we'll look at some different phrases people may use to give an

  • opinion. So, remember we can use all these phrases as an alternative just to: "I think",

  • which is not very imaginative language, not very expressive either.

  • So, what if you say:

  • "It looks as if..." We can use this phrase to give an indirect opinion.

  • So, let's imagine a situation. I'm going to use the same situation for all these. Our

  • friend, Tom, he was going to have a party, he's invited a few people, but he hasn't really

  • planned anything, and it's got close to the time of the party and now he's having

  • second thoughts because he hasn't organi-... He hasn't organized anything, and maybe this party's

  • not going to happen. So, I can say:

  • "It looks as if Tom's going to cancel his party."

  • And I can say that, rather than: "I think Tom's going to cancel his party."

  • It's an indirect way of giving an opinion.

  • The same situation: "It sounds like Tom's going to cancel his party."

  • Now, I notice,

  • when I'm... When I'm just speaking naturally in lessons to people, sometimes... Or even

  • friends, people I meet. Sometimes they get really confused by "sounds like". If you haven't

  • encountered it before, you might not realize it means the same as "think" or maybe more

  • like "seem", "It seems like". So, a person who uses this in their speech is likely to

  • be someone who interprets the world through their hearing sense, a person who is an auditory...

  • A person who has auditory communication style.

  • The next one, here: "To tell you the truth..." Using the same situation:

  • "To tell you the truth, I think Tom's going to cancel his party because he hasn't done any preparation."

  • That's just a phrase that we use before we... We make a statement about what's true, apparently.

  • And when we use language like "tell" or "say", again, this one relates to the

  • auditory communication style.

  • I mentioned this a little bit earlier, someone who always talks in: "I feel" or "I'm feeling",

  • they're a kinesthetic person, and we can use this in place of "I think".

  • Also, somebody who uses: "I sense...",

  • "I get the sense that Tom's going to cancel his party because he hasn't done any preparation."

  • In that example I just said for you there,

  • I said: "I get a sense", we can also say that.

  • "I think..." I don't need to say anything about that.

  • And we could also say: "I know..." Certainty. So, some people will say this:

  • "I know Tom's going to cancel his party because he hasn't done anything." Even if you don't actually

  • 100% know, some people will use that kind of language, and that can indicate that they

  • are an auditory digital style of communicator.

  • Is this useful for anything? Well, according to NLP, if you are communicating with someone,

  • if you're talking to someone, and you can identify their communication style because

  • they're using lots of language that is visual or one of the others - if you match your own

  • language to theirs, you will get on better, you will have better rapport, you will have

  • a flowing conversation, basically, because in that moment you're interpreting the world

  • from the same... From the same point of view and the same sense.

  • When we're having conversations with people, we can also build "rapport", which is a word

  • for connection and friendliness, by replying to the person we're speaking to, saying these

  • kind of phrases. So, a similar... A similar exa-... A phrase of... I'm not talking properly, here.

  • You could say something like: "I understand."-okay?-in reply to one of these things.

  • "It looks as if Tom's going to cancel the party because he hasn't done any preparation."

  • "I understand." You could say that.

  • Or you could say one of these, and these, again, relate to the different

  • communication styles. You could say:

  • "I hear you." It means: "I understand." Of course,

  • literally, you hear what the person has told you, but other than that, it gives us a sense

  • of what's important for that person. You might also say:

  • "I'm listening." That means: "Tell me more."

  • You could say: "I see your point." Again, it means: "I understand."

  • You could say: "I can imagine." Someone who is able to imagine the situation, that again, is visual.

  • You're seeing a picture in your mind's eye. Or you might say:

  • "That makes sense", based on what you already know about the situation, and that would make you an auditory digital

  • kind of person. When we come back, I'm going to teach you some idioms and expressions that

  • also relate to the four different communication styles.

  • Let's have a look at some idioms and expressions to do with the different senses. So, first

  • of all, we have the ones to do with touch, feeling, or we could say kinesthetic idioms.

  • "Someone who can think on their feet." This is someone who's, like, really quick thinking.

  • If you're looking to employ someone, often they're looking for someone who can think

  • on their feet. If it's a job where you never know what's going to happen that day, you

  • want someone who can respond quickly to different problems.

  • What about when: "Actions speak louder than words", what does that mean?

  • That means that, to you, what... What somebody does is more important than what they say.

  • So, this is the idea that somebody can be saying all the right things,

  • but yet, their behaviour doesn't

  • match all the good words that they're saying. So, to a feeling-orientated person, what you

  • do is a lot more important than what you say.

  • What does it mean "To bite your tongue"?

  • Often these verbs of the senses, they create really

  • visual images. "To bite your tongue", physically means that you're not able to speak, but what

  • it means is not say something when you really want to.

  • When you really want to say something,

  • but there are times that you just need to bite your tongue because it would be inappropriate

  • for you to say something, or maybe... Maybe it would cause trouble. So, in those situations,

  • you need to bite your tongue.

  • And lastly for this section:

  • "To get to grips with something".

  • "Grip" is... "To grip" something

  • is a verb. We do with your... You do with your hand. It means to hold something quite tightly,

  • like, now I'm gripping the pen quite tightly. So, "to get to grips with something"

  • means to get to the point where you fully understand it.

  • Moving on, now, let's look at some expressions to do with the auditory hearing sense.

  • When a place is really, really, really quiet, we say: "You could hear a pin drop there."

  • Just imagine the sound of a pin falling.

  • "Ding." I don't know what it would sound like, maybe like that.

  • Moving on: "To have a word with someone". We use this expression to mean when we want

  • to talk to someone in private. Not necessarily private, actually.

  • "I need to speak to Jane and have a word with her."

  • Sometimes it can mean that someone's going to get in trouble

  • when you have a word with someone, but not all the time.

  • And, what does it mean to "talk something over" with someone?

  • This means to discuss a problem.

  • "I set up a meeting so that we can talk over the plans for next year."

  • Moving on, let's have a look at some phrases to do the auditory digital communication style.

  • These people are very logical people who interpret the world in things being very clear and fitting

  • certain rules. So, to this kind of commun-... Communicator, you might hear them say something

  • like: "Trying to make sense of something". When you want to make sense of something,

  • you want to understand it fully. You try to make sense of it.

  • To this kind of communicator as well, it's also important to use your common sense.

  • What does "common sense" mean? Well, "common sense" can mean what's really obvious.

  • So, sometimes people are really, really intelligent,

  • they know a lot, but they don't have any common sense.

  • When you don't have any common sense, you don't... Maybe don't know how to do really

  • simple, practical tasks that most people know how to do.

  • And let's have a look at what's left in the visual section.

  • When you "Don't see eye to eye with someone",

  • this is someone that you just can't really help but disagree with them.

  • You're always having one opinion, they're always having a different opinion, and you

  • never meet in the middle. You don't see eye to eye with someone.

  • And this is quite a good one to understand the general idea of communication style as well,

  • because someone who's interpreting the world in a really visual way all the time,

  • with that sense being really, really strong may not have such good rapport and make such

  • easy conversation with someone who's auditory digital, for example, someone who's very logical,

  • precise, clear. Anyway, just something to think about, there.

  • So, what you can do now is go to the engVid website,(www.engvid.com) do a quiz on today's lesson.

  • And what you can also do before you go is subscribe here to my channel. I also have a different

  • channel, because I've got two YouTube channels.

  • Really appreciate it if you subscribe in both places.

  • And I'm going to go now.

  • See you.

Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is language of the senses,

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A2 UK auditory sense language communication cancel party

Effective expressions to express your personality

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    Flora Hu posted on 2016/05/17
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