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  • A lot of developments in the U.S. presidential nomination process.

  • That's coming up later today on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up, in the South American nation of Venezuela,

  • there's a rationing system in place.

  • Residents say that if they want to buy flour,

  • rice or milk at a government supermarket, they have to wait in line, sometimes for an entire day,

  • and they're limited on the days when they can do that.

  • The drop in oil prices in a country whose revenue is dependent on oil sales caused major deficits.

  • The government tried to make up for those by printing money.

  • That led to severe inflation when the value of currency goes down and the price of goods goes up.

  • There are food shortages. People can't get medical care.

  • They're buying medicine on the black market.

  • Electricity has been rationed in many areas, shutting down power for hours a day.

  • There had been riots.

  • Stores had been looted, and there's effort going on to remove President Nicolas Maduro from office.

  • Officially, Venezuela is a federal presidential republic.

  • But the government's moved in recent years toward socialism,

  • extended government controls over major industries.

  • Venezuela's economic disaster.

  • This economic crisis has been years in the making.

  • The socialist government here is being accused of really discouraging investment

  • in this economy and what's happened over the last years is we've seen severe shortages of food.

  • What really made things dramatic though was when oil price plunged about a year and a half ago now.

  • Venezuela depends on the selling of oil for almost all of its government income.

  • On top of that, it is now so reliant on imports of almost everything.

  • They are not taking in enough money to pay for all the imports that they need.

  • And that has now led to rampant inflation. The IMF says at least 700 percent by the end of this year.

  • Staying in the Western Hemisphere,

  • but jumping to Northern Canada. An entire city in the province of Alberta has been evacuated.

  • Eighty-eight thousand people have been told to leave their homes

  • and whole neighborhoods have been scorched by an explosive wildfire.

  • The city of Fort McMurray has been the hardest hit.

  • Officials don't know yet what started the fire.

  • But they know what's made it worse, extreme temperatures exceeding 90 degrees Fahrenheit,

  • bone dry conditions and high winds.

  • Seventy-four hundred acres and 1,600 buildings and houses have been destroyed.

  • But there had been no reports of deaths or injuries,

  • and cooler weather in the 60s later this week should help firefighters. U.S. President Barack Obama

  • traveled to Flint, Michigan, yesterday and took a sip of filtered water.

  • His aim: to reassure residents that the federal government isn't ignoring them.

  • The city's had a water crisis since its supply was switched two years ago to the polluted Flint River.

  • It wasn't treated properly and caused lead, a dangerous toxic metal, to seep into Flint's water supply.

  • It's been switched back but problems continue.

  • Residents blamed local and state officials for causing them and a complaint

  • was filed against the Obama administration last week

  • saying the Environmental Protection Agency knew about the lead poisoning months

  • before residents were notified.

  • President Obama called on Congress to pass emergency funding to help the city.

  • U.S. lawmakers are debating a package worth $150 million

  • for water system repairs and health care assistance.

  • I want to start this "Roll Call" with a special shout-out to all of you teachers watching today.

  • Thank you for using the show in your classroom, your home school, your curriculum.

  • However you use it, we sincerely appreciate you this Teacher Appreciation Week.

  • First school we're visiting is Lebanon Middle School, the home of the Tigers. It's located in Lebanon, Indiana.

  • Next, Elko High School is here. In the city of Elko, Nevada, the Indians are watching today.

  • And in the South Korean capital of Seoul, it's great to see you everyone at Changchun Middle School.

  • Results from Indiana: businessman Donald Trump won the state's primary contest

  • for the Republicans and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won for the Democrats.

  • Mr. Trump's victory was quickly followed by an announcement from Texas Senator Ted Cruz.

  • He said he was suspending his campaign.

  • Then, yesterday afternoon, Ohio Governor John Kasich did the same thing.

  • What this means is that Trump will run unopposed for the rest of the contest

  • and he'll likely clinch the number of delegates

  • he needs to become the Republican Party's nominee for president.

  • So, there'll probably be known contested convention for the GOP.

  • But will there be one for Democrats?

  • Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is still the frontrunner.

  • She's won hundreds more delegates and superdelegates than Senator Sanders.

  • But he says he has momentum after Tuesday's win,

  • and promises to take the fight to the Democratic convention in July.

  • Looking ahead to the general election,

  • it's not the popular vote but the Electoral College vote that decides who wins the presidency.

  • Based on Electoral College results from the last election,

  • what would the strategies look like if Hillary Clinton ultimately does face Donald Trump in November?

  • This map we're showing you right here is the 2012 map.

  • This is Barack Obama, the blue states,

  • versus Mitt Romney the red states.

  • Another way to look at it is we could do this.

  • This is our first CNN battleground map for the 2016 election.

  • If they're dark red, we believe they're likely to stay red.

  • If they're dark blue, we think they're likely to stay blue,

  • and you see the lighter shades for likely Democratic states or likely Republican states.

  • Let me start, Wolf, on this map. Donald Trump says,

  • I can beat Hillary Clinton in places that are traditionally Democratic.

  • If Donald Trump could do that and Democrats watching are going to say,

  • hey, wait a minute, it won't happen.

  • But if Donald Trump can win in Pennsylvania, if Donald Trump can win in Ohio,

  • Michigan and the come over here and win Wisconsin, he's the president of the United States.

  • You can do it -- now, you can do it, I make it sound easy.

  • Those are four states that have been traditionally Democratic for a long time.

  • But it can be done just in this part of the country,

  • which is why Donald Trump reaches out to Bernie Sanders supporters,

  • why Donald Trump talks about the trade message.

  • In his mind, in his campaign team's mind,

  • you can do this in one part of the country where he has proven that he has appeal to blue collar workers.

  • Now, the Clinton campaign would never concede this is going to happen.

  • They're going to say that this state, Pennsylvania, has not gone Republicans since George H.W. Bush.

  • They're going to say, we're going to compete in all these other states.

  • They're going to say, you're never going to take that away.

  • But let's assume let's just say, I pick these two. Let's say Donald Trump gets two of them.

  • Where else does he go?

  • That is the fascinating question for the Trump campaign.

  • Obviously, Florida is one of the biggest prices. Hillary Clinton believes with the Latino vote,

  • with the suburban vote and a changing state that she can keep it. But what if Donald Trump won Florida?

  • This is now the chess game going on both campaigns.

  • How do you change the map?

  • Can Donald Trump put these states in play? If so, where does Hillary Clinton go looking?

  • Let's say Donald Trump -- I don't think that one we should just yet, but let's leave this one blue --

  • let's say Donald Trump wins these three,

  • Hillary Clinton still winning here, where does Trump go for the other one?

  • Well, he's going to have to try in smaller states like in Iowa, in smaller states like in New Hampshire,

  • starts to even out the math.

  • So, as we begin the calculations and the thinking about the general election,

  • there's no question for Donald Trump, the first test is change the map in the industrial states

  • that have been reliably blue for quite a long time.

  • If you're Hillary Clinton, what are you looking at?

  • You think it's possible, possible, with a high Latino turnout, that you might be able to turn Arizona.

  • You think it's possible, if you can get a high African- American turnout

  • and if conservatives say Never Trump and stay home, you could turn a state like Georgia,

  • where the combination of high Democratic turnout suppress conservative turnout.

  • These are the calculations now going on the campaign.

  • But as I reset this, I just want to reset it and come back to this. As you look at the Obama-Romney map,

  • the biggest tests for the Trump campaign is actually to prove, to prove and have the polling prove

  • that you can compete across here, because if you can make the Democrats spend time, money,

  • resources here, then it can change the map in other ways.

  • Now, we're talking hypothetically about a contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

  • But Bernie Sanders, he did win in Indiana, an important win for him. His supporters are going to say,

  • why aren't we paying attention to his win? The answer is it's proportional.

  • It's proportional. And look, if Bernie Sanders were somehow to become the Democratic nominee,

  • we have the same -- you'll be having the very same conversation about the electoral map in those states.

  • But here's the issue for Bernie Sanders, let me take the superdelegates off the table for a minute.

  • We give Bernie Sanders Indiana,

  • Hillary Clinton begun the night with a more than 300 lead in just pledged delegates.

  • Bernie Sanders will shave into that,

  • but, Wolf, he's going to cut it very modest because of the proportional Democratic rules.

  • Even if he wins by, he's up now by seven points, even if he wins by seven points, you split the delegates,

  • 53-46, something roughly along those lines. So, he'll gain, if she starts way over 315 --

  • and you play this out the rest of the way -- number one, if he won everything left, 55-45,

  • a bigger margin than he's winning tonight, he still wouldn't catch up.

  • A couple of weeks ago, we showed you a type of hoverboard apparently powered by a jet turbine engine.

  • Its inventor, Franky Zapata, just set a Guinness World Record on it for the furthest flight on a hoverboard.

  • He was off the coast of Southern France. He had to fly farther than 905 feet, the previous record, and he did it.

  • Zapata flew almost 1 1/2 miles.

  • The board is still a prototype.

  • You can't buy one.

  • But if it hits the market, it's the board to board if you're bored with the boards that board on water,

  • board on land, board on asphalt, board on sand, but leave you gasping for air,

  • wishing you'd soared with the board that hovers aboarding the gravity that holds down others.

  • That's all I got today. I'm Carl Azuz. We'll see you Friday.

A lot of developments in the U.S. presidential nomination process.

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May 5, 2016 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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