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  • In my industry,

  • we believe that images can change the world.

  • Okay, we're naive, we're bright-eyed and bushy-tailed.

  • The truth is that we know that the

  • images themselves don't change the world,

  • but we're also aware that, since the beginning of photography,

  • images have provoked reactions in people,

  • and those reactions have caused change to happen.

  • So let's begin with a group of images.

  • I'd be extremely surprised

  • if you didn't recognize many or most of them.

  • They're best described as iconic:

  • so iconic, perhaps, they're cliches.

  • In fact, they're so well-known

  • that you might even recognize them

  • in a slightly or somewhat different form.

  • (Laughter)

  • But I think we're looking for something more.

  • We're looking for something more.

  • We're looking for images that shine

  • an uncompromising light on crucial issues,

  • images that transcend borders, that transcend religions,

  • images that provoke us

  • to step up and do something --

  • in other words, to act.

  • Well, this image you've all seen.

  • It changed our view of the physical world.

  • We had never seen our planet from this perspective before.

  • Many people credit

  • a lot of the birth of the environmental movement

  • to our seeing the planet like this

  • for the first time --

  • its smallness, its fragility.

  • Forty years later, this group, more than most,

  • are well aware of the destructive power

  • that our species can wield over our environment.

  • And at last, we appear to be doing something about it.

  • This destructive power takes many different forms.

  • For example, these images taken by Brent Stirton

  • in the Congo.

  • These gorillas were murdered, some would even say crucified,

  • and unsurprisingly,

  • they sparked international outrage.

  • Most recently,

  • we've been tragically reminded of the destructive power of nature itself

  • with the recent earthquake in Haiti.

  • Well, I think what is far worse

  • is man's destructive power over man.

  • Samuel Pisar, an Auschwitz survivor, said,

  • and I'll quote him,

  • "The Holocaust teaches us that nature,

  • even in its cruelest moments,

  • is benign in comparison with man,

  • when he loses his moral compass and his reason."

  • There's another kind of crucifixion.

  • The horrifying images from Abu Ghraib

  • as well as the images from Guantanamo

  • had a profound impact.

  • The publication of those images,

  • as opposed to the images themselves,

  • caused a government to change its policies.

  • Some would argue that it is those images

  • that did more to fuel the insurgency in Iraq

  • than virtually any other single act.

  • Furthermore, those images forever removed

  • the so-called moral high ground of the occupying forces.

  • Let's go back a little.

  • In the 1960s and 1970s,

  • the Vietnam War was basically shown

  • in America's living rooms day in, day out.

  • News photos brought people face to face

  • with the victims of the war: a little girl burned by napalm,

  • a student killed by the National Guard

  • at Kent State University in Ohio during a protest.

  • In fact, these images became

  • the voices of protest themselves.

  • Now, images have power

  • to shed light of understanding

  • on suspicion, ignorance,

  • and in particular -- I've given a lot of talks on this

  • but I'll just show one image --

  • the issue of HIV/AIDS.

  • In the 1980s, the stigmatization of people with the disease

  • was an enormous barrier

  • to even discussing or addressing it.

  • A simple act, in 1987, of the most famous woman in the world,

  • the Princess of Wales, touching

  • an HIV/AIDS infected baby

  • did a great deal, especially in Europe, to stop that.

  • She, better than most, knew the power of an image.

  • So when we are confronted by a powerful image,

  • we all have a choice:

  • We can look away, or we can address the image.

  • Thankfully, when these photos appeared in

  • The Guardian in 1998,

  • they put a lot of focus and attention and, in the end, a lot of money

  • towards the Sudan famine relief efforts.

  • Did the images change the world?

  • No, but they had a major impact.

  • Images often push us to question our core beliefs

  • and our responsibilities to each other.

  • We all saw those images after Katrina,

  • and I think for millions of people

  • they had a very strong impact.

  • And I think it's very unlikely

  • that they were far from the minds of Americans

  • when they went to vote in November 2008.

  • Unfortunately, some very important images

  • are deemed too graphic or disturbing for us to see them.

  • I'll show you one photo here,

  • and it's a photo by Eugene Richards of an Iraq War veteran

  • from an extraordinary piece of work,

  • which has never been published, called War Is Personal.

  • But images don't need to be graphic

  • in order to remind us of the tragedy of war.

  • John Moore set up this photo at Arlington Cemetery.

  • After all the tense moments of conflict

  • in all the conflict zones of the world,

  • there's one photograph from a much quieter place

  • that haunts me still, much more than the others.

  • Ansel Adams said, and I'm going to disagree with him,

  • "You don't take a photograph, you make it."

  • In my view, it's not the photographer who makes the photo,

  • it's you.

  • We bring to each image

  • our own values, our own belief systems,

  • and as a result of that, the image resonates with us.

  • My company has 70 million images.

  • I have one image in my office.

  • Here it is.

  • I hope that the next time you see

  • an image that sparks something in you,

  • you'll better understand why,

  • and I know that speaking to this audience,

  • you'll definitely do something about it.

  • And thank you to all the photographers.

  • (Applause)

In my industry,

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B1 UK TED image destructive photo power war

【TED】Jonathan Klein: Photos that changed the world (Jonathan Klein: Photos that changed the world)

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    尹若希 posted on 2016/04/28
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