Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Since the early 80s, the Japanese company CAPCOM had been releasing a line of various arcade games.

  • In 1984, CAPCOM hired a young video game designer named Yoshiki Okamoto

  • to their Research & Development department alongside Noritaka Funamizu.

  • Okamoto would go on to oversee the development of CAPCOM games as a

  • producer and recruit a character designer named Akira Yasuda. One of the games he

  • oversaw was Street Fighter which was created by Takashi Nishiyama and Hiroshi Matsumoto.

  • It was released in 1987 and would become the first competitive

  • fighting game produced by the company. A port of the game was soon released for the

  • Turbo Grafx CD console under the title Fighting Street in 1988.

  • In the game, the player would compete in one-on-one matches against a computer-controlled opponent or another player.

  • The objective of the match was for the player to defeat the opponent within a given

  • time before the opponent could do the same.

  • While Street Fighter wasn't the first game of its kind, it introduced many aspects that would become standards in the genre.

  • Players could block attacks, compete with other players at any given time, and perform special moves.

  • This was the introduction of the famous fireball attack, hurricane kick, and

  • dragon punch. Originally, the arcade machines offered the player no kind of

  • instruction pertaining to how they could execute these special moves. Not only was

  • this because the designers want this knowledge to be passed down through word

  • of mouth but these moves also proved to be incredibly devastating when used in

  • matches. The original arcade cabinets came with a joystick and two pressure

  • sensitive buttons. The amount of force the player would use to push the button would determine the

  • level of strength in the attacks. While this was supposed to be the designers'

  • way of immersing the player into the game, it just led to damaged arcade machines.

  • So, CAPCOM got rid of this problem by introducing a six button configuration for

  • the light, medium, and heavy attacks, another standard that would continue in

  • future fighting games. The game had the player control a Japanese martial artist named

  • Ryu who competes in an international martial arts tournament.

  • The second player would control Ken who played the same as Ryu except with a different look

  • in aesthetics. In single player mode, the player would fight against ten opponents from

  • five different nations. From Japan, there was Retsu, a former Kempo instructor and

  • Geki, a claw-wielding ninja.

  • From the United States, there was Joe,

  • an underground martial arts champion,

  • and Mike, a former heavyweight boxer.

  • From China, there was a Lee, a Chinese martial arts expert, and Gen, an elderly

  • professional killer. From England, there was Birdie, a tall heavyweight bouncer,

  • and Eagle, a club-wielding bodyguard. In between these matches, players would

  • enter short bonus stages that would test the player's strength and timing.

  • After defeating the initial eight fighters, the player would travel to Thailand and fight against

  • Adon, a disciple of the Emperor of Muay Thai, and Sagat, the eye-patch wearing Emperor of Muay Thai.

  • When the game was released on the Turbo Grafx CD, it didn't turn out to be a massive success for CAPCOM.

  • The port of the arcade game suffered from long load times and poor controls.

  • Due to the controller's inability to have the six button control scheme,

  • the strength of the attack was determined by how long the button was held down.

  • The game was ported to many other game systems at the time such as the Commodore 64,

  • ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC, DOS, and Amiga.

  • The original arcade version was eventually emulated and featured in a CAPCOM game

  • compilation for the PC, PSP, PS2, and Xbox. In 1988, Yoshiki

  • was asked by CAPCOM to make a sequel for Street Fighter as it had generated much success and fans.

  • For his inspiration, Yoshiki looked at a current arcade hit, Double Dragon II: The Revenge.

  • His goal was to make a game that looked and played much better.

  • With CAPCOM wanting a Street Fighter sequel, his game was shown at trade shows under the title Street Fighter '89.

  • Once the press saw the game and complained that

  • it was nothing like Street Fighter, the title of the game was changed to Final Fight.

  • While there is never a direct connection to the Street Fighter universe, there are

  • many subtle references to the series throughout the game such as one of the main

  • characters is mentioned to being a former street fighter. The characters were designed by

  • recently hired Akira Yasuda, who is credited under the name Akiman.

  • The world of Final Fight is set in the fictional town of Metro City sometime during the 1990s.

  • Players had the option to choose from three different characters and play

  • cooperatively with someone else. The roster consisted of the newly-elected mayor and

  • former wrestler Mike Haggar and two martial artists named Cody and Guy. They face

  • off against the Mad Gear street gang who have kidnapped the mayor's daughter Jessica and are

  • threatening to take over the city.

  • Even without the Street Fighter name, Final Fight was a successful game for CAPCOM

  • and is heralded as one of the best beat-em-ups of all time. Many of the game's

  • characters would continue to exist outside of Metro City and appear in future Street Fighter games.

  • The game's success on the Super Nintendo led to CAPCOM producing two more games exclusively for the system.

  • The franchise kept a low profile until CAPCOM attempted resurrecting the series in 2005 with Final Fight Streetwise.

  • The game was a massive flop and the studio behind the game soon shut down after its release.

  • In 1990, CAPCOM tried making another offshoot of the original

  • Street Fighter with the NES game Street Fighter 2010: The Final Fight.

  • Instead of a competitive fighting game, the game was more of an action platform game that focused on boss battles.

  • The game was marketed as a futuristic version of the original arcade game with a sci-fi theme.

  • However, the story in the Japanese version had very little related to Street Fighter,

  • though the English localization changed the main character's name from Kevin to Ken and

  • explained how he became a cyborg who fights aliens after becoming the Street Fighter champion.

  • When it came to America, the game suffered from a terrible localization and unforgiving difficulty.

  • Fans of Street Fighter saw the game as just an embarrassment and don't consider it part of the franchise.

  • While it never reached the popularity of its future installments, the original Street

  • Fighter was the game that introduced many of the now common fighting game

  • conventions and laid down the foundation for the franchise that would continue to evolve in later games.

  • Many of the characters featured in the game would continue to appear in future

  • games in the franchise. Unfortunately, the two men who created Street Fighter left CAPCOM after

  • the game's production and were hired by SNK where they would go on to develop many of its fighting game franchises.

  • The rivalry between SNK and CAPCOM would begin with the release of Street Fighter's now legendary sequel.

  • Next time in Part 2 of this Street Fighter Retrospective.

  • The series returns with the most important chapter in its history.

  • It would become one of the most popular games of its time and result in a number of imitators and rivalries

  • but eventually come out as the most timeless of all.

Since the early 80s, the Japanese company CAPCOM had been releasing a line of various arcade games.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 street fighter fighter street capcom player arcade

A Street Fighter Retrospective (Part 1) - The Nostalgic Gamer

  • 109 6
    阿多賓 posted on 2013/04/23
Video vocabulary