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  • Paging, Dr. Friday. We have a case of awesome.

  • I'm Carl Azuz. Thanks for spending 10 minutes of your Friday with us.

  • First up, a meeting between two leaders who have more in common than a national border.

  • Canada and the U.S. historically have been allies.

  • They've cooperated on issues like trade and security.

  • Canadian prime ministers have been regular visitors to the White House in the past.

  • But Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s trip to Washington is the first formal visit by a Canadian premier in 19 years.

  • And he received a very warm welcome from U.S. President Barack Obama.

  • The American leader discussed their common ground in terms of social, economic, and foreign policies.

  • Prime Minister Trudeau has some critics in Canada,

  • like some of his cabinet members, he has limited political experience.

  • His country’s budget deficit is much greater than his liberal party had predicted.

  • But since his election last October, he’s developed a strong alliance with his American counterpart.

  • Justin Trudeau is a relatively new face in Canadian politics, but one with a very popular last name.

  • Who is Justin Trudeau?

  • With a stunning victory in Canada’s recent general election.

  • Trudeau ended a decade of conservative rule in Canada.

  • He was born in 1971 while his father Pierre Trudeau was prime minister.

  • His popularity was so great it was dubbed "Trudeau-mania".

  • He was compared even to John F. Kennedy.

  • When Justin delivered a powerful eulogy at his father’s funeral,

  • it sparked talk of a political dynasty

  • The former school teacher took his time getting into politics,

  • trying his hand at acting, charity boxing, even coaching bungee jumpers.

  • But after his father’s death, he became more politically active, winning a seat in parliament in 2008.

  • Skeptics said he was too young and inexperienced to become prime minister.

  • But by all accounts, he ran a very impressive campaign, sweeping the liberals to victory.

  • For years, the conservative prime minister,r Stephen Harpe,

  • kept the economy running relatively smoothly.

  • Keep taxes low and he ran a very robust foreign policy aimed at taking on terrorists.

  • By contrast, Trudeau is promising to pull out of counter-terrorism operations in the Middle East,

  • restore ties with Iran, and he also wants to bring 25,000 Syrian refugees to Canada.

  • Back home, the father of three intends to raise taxes on the wealthy

  • and double spending on public infrastructure and push a very aggressive climate change agenda.

  • Trudeau has shown he has the star power of his father.

  • Now, he has to prove he has the political chops

  • and ride this new wave of Trudeau-mania into opportunities for Canada.

  • It was exactly five years ago today that a catastrophic 9.0 magnitude earthquake shook Eastern Japan.

  • It was the fourth largest earthquake ever recorded in the Asian country.

  • And it generated a tsunami, a wall of ocean water with 30-foot waves

  • that swept some coastal developments out to sea.

  • The tsunami also damaged some reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

  • That led to meltdowns, contamination, and the complete evacuations of some Japanese towns.

  • The threat from nuclear radiation remains.

  • Next week, well show you how marine life was affected,

  • how seafood still has to be tested before it can be eaten.

  • Today, were taking you inside one of the cities where recovery is nowhere in sight.

  • Whenever Suichiro Saito (ph) wants to check on his home,

  • he has to wear this to guard against radiation.

  • Saito only comes a few times a year to the house his family has owned since before World War II.

  • Each visit, more difficult than the last.

  • Each room, devastated. Poison does little to keep the rats away.

  • "It’s painful," he says.

  • "My wife doesn’t want to come here. The house is getting more dilapidated."

  • This room pretty much hasn’t been touched since the earthquake.

  • You can see the calendar, March, 2011.

  • There’s laundry hanging. It was done right before the earthquake hit.

  • The shaking lasted six minutes.

  • Tsunami waves soon after --

  • -- icy cold, consuming coastal towns.

  • Five years ago, on March 11th, 2011, almost 20,000 people died.

  • Many, spared by nature, would soon face a manmade disaster.

  • Saito’s house is three kilometers, less than two miles from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant.

  • His town Futaba sits empty.

  • More than 6,000 people once lived and worked here.

  • Today, theyre allowed in for just five hours at a time.

  • Nearly 100,000 Fukushima residents are still evacuated.

  • Nearly 19,000 still living in what was supposed to be temporary housing.

  • Some choose to stay. Others have nowhere else to go.

  • Setsuko Matsumoto used to live within walking distance of her children.

  • Now, they barely see each other.

  • "I had a happy life," she says.

  • "The disaster made a lot of families fall apart, including mine."

  • Saito also lived with his parents and children and grandchildren. Now, theyre scattered in several cities.

  • What did you grow here?

  • The soil on his farm, contaminated.

  • "I’m sad," he says. "I’m empty."

  • A feeling shared by so many here, five years later.

  • Catching up now with three of the groups watching our show.

  • These are from yesterday’s transcript page at CNNStudentNews.com.

  • Brunswick High School is in Southeast Georgia.

  • From the city of Brunswick, the Pirates are setting sail.

  • In the city of Monroe, Iowa, weve got the Mustangs roaming free.

  • MPC High School is on the roll.

  • And though Shanghai isn’t China’s capital,

  • it’s the Asian country’s most populated city and it’s home to Shanghai Experimental School.

  • Would it be possible to grow plants on Mars?

  • If you saw the movie "The Martian", you saw one kind of unsavory idea about how to do that.

  • This Dutch ecologist recently did an experiment to see if it’d be possible using other substances.

  • He got some simulated soil from NASA.

  • Basically, it’s a type of dirt that has a similar composition to the soil found on Mars and the moon.

  • His team added grass as a fertilizer and grew crops in trays.

  • And it worked. They succeeded in growing tomatoes, peas, radishes and rye.

  • But there was a problem and it’s a big one.

  • The soil has significant amounts of heavy metals, like arsenic and lead.

  • And if these substances wound up in the plants themselves,

  • they could be toxic to anyone who ate them.

  • So, the next step is for the team to determine how much if any of these metals are in the grown crops

  • and whether they’d be safe to eat.

  • Another experiment before we go.

  • Swedish musician Martin Molin was fascinated with antique mechanical devices that make music.

  • So, he set out to build his own using 2,000 marbles to produce sound.

  • The Wintergatan marble machine is ridiculously complicated.

  • It’s like a musical Rube Goldberg device.

  • It took him more than a year to put it together and perfect it.

  • But it’s programmable, allowing him to change up the sound it makes.

  • And overall, it sounds amazing.

  • So you can say it struck a chord, that it’s a notes-worthy invention by a great mechanic,

  • that it’s an inspiring sounding board.

  • One thing is clear as a bell about the man behind the machine,

  • he hasn’t lost his marbles. I’m Carl Azuz and saying "happy weekend" is music to our ears.

Paging, Dr. Friday. We have a case of awesome.

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March 11, 2016 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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