Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • The unexpected passing of a U. S. Supreme Court Justice leads off our show.

  • This is CNN Student News, and I'm Carl Azuz.

  • Antonin Scalia had been characterized as the leading conservative voice

  • on the Hight Court. He'd served since 1986

  • after being appointed by President Ronald Reagan.

  • Of course the Senate had to confirm him first,

  • and it did so unanimously by a vote of 98 to 0.

  • Scalia was still serving on the Supreme Court at the time of his sudden death.

  • He'd recently traveled to Texas for a hunting trip.

  • A government official says he'd told friends he wasn't feeling well

  • before going to bed Friday night and that he died in his sleep.

  • A country judge from Texas says that Justice Scalia had health issues

  • and that he died of natural causes.

  • There were no signs of foul play according to law enforcement officials

  • at the ranch where he was staying.

  • Scalia believed that judges should follow the exact words of the U. S. Constitution

  • and not apply a modern interpretation to the governing document.

  • He also had great admiration for the U. S. founding fathers who crafted it.

  • I truly believe that there are times in history when genius

  • bursts forth at some part of the globe like 2000 BC

  • in Athens or Quiquicento, Florence for art

  • and I think one of those places was 18th century America, for political science.

  • There's a political battle forming over Scalia's replacement.

  • There's a political process by which that person will have to be nominated,

  • so we're gonna bring you more on this story throughout the week.

  • Pope Francis is on his first trip to Mexico since he

  • became the leader of the Roman Catholic church.

  • More than 82 % of Mexicans are estimated to be Catholic

  • and the Pope has greeted huge audiences since he arrived in the North American country.

  • He's staying each night in the capital, Mexico City,

  • but from there, he's flying all over.

  • Yesterday, he visited the southern Mexican state of Chiapa

  • s near the border with Guatemala.

  • Pope Francis spoke out against what he called,

  • the contamination and theft of Native American lands.

  • Chiapas is the poorest state in Mexico,

  • but not the only impoverished area he visited.

  • Pope Francis helicoptered in to on of the most dangerous places

  • in Mexico on his second full day at Ecatepec,

  • a sprawling suburbs just outside of Mexico City notorious

  • for it's poverty and for it's violence.

  • In fact, the Pontiff's decision to visit there ruffled more than a few officials' feathers.

  • It was pure joy, however, for the hundreds of thousands who turned out

  • to try and just catch a glimpse of the Pontiff as he drove by on his way to mass.

  • The mass itself was surprisingly critical.

  • Pope Francis lashed out of what he called the temptations

  • of wealth, power, and fame and during the angelus, he was even more direct.

  • He told Mexicans they need to build a community

  • that provides opportunity rather than a country that destroys young people.

  • Back in Mexico City, Pope Francis visited a children's hospital,

  • many of the patients young victims of cancer.

  • And there were touching moments, for example,

  • when he gave a rosary to one young boy and asked him to pray for him,

  • to another he administered his medicine.

  • A young girl sang Ave Maria.

  • Next today, international officials aren't sure who's responsible

  • for apparent airstrikes that hit two hospitals and a school building

  • in Northern Syria yesterday.

  • At least 22 people were killed.

  • The Syrian government in Russia had separately been blamed

  • for the strikes but neither immediately responded the accusations.

  • Battles have been intense in parts of Syria.

  • Even though a cessation of hostilities,

  • an international agreement to curb the fighting was reached last week

  • at a conference in Germany.

  • There are doubts if it will hold.

  • The ceasefire was agreed by the International Syria Support Group

  • which is a 17 member body and it is designated by the U. N. by U. N. resolution

  • as the key actor, the major actor in brokering a Syria peace deal.

  • It encompasses the U. S ., U. K ., European powers,

  • some of the regional actors that have a stake in this, Russia,

  • but what it doesn't have is any of the key actors on the ground.

  • There is no representation of President Bashar Al- Assad's government and there is of course,

  • no representation from ISIS and that is really where

  • this is going to stand or fall is how the actors on the ground behave in the coming days.

  • How the monitoring will be carried out and what the penalties will be

  • if this ceasefire is broken. The other big issue is going to be that

  • there is no agreement on the cessation of Russian airstrikes.

  • At the heart of all this though, of course,

  • is the delivery of aid and the U. N. has said that it hopes to be delivering aid

  • to the civilian population and that's gonna be unbelievably welcome on the ground.

  • Out of more than 1, 400 requests on Friday's transcript,

  • here are three of the schools who want to be on our roll- call.

  • We'll start at Raisin, Wisconsin, the walnuts are watching CNN Student News.

  • They're at Walden III Middle High School.

  • Farson is located in Western Wyoming and the pronghorns

  • are the mascot of Farson- Eden School.

  • And we're wrapping up our roll in the capital of Vietnam.

  • That's Hanoi and that's the home of the United Nations International School.

  • Two words that we hear so often when it comes to how we look,

  • diet and exercise. And it turns out that

  • how we feel about ourselves may also be tied in to working out.

  • The doctor is here to look at the cerebral connection between getting fit and feeling good.

  • Regular workouts are worth a lot more than a six pack,

  • but we all know how good exercise is for your body,

  • healthier heart, healthier lungs,

  • but have you ever thought about just how good exercise is for your brain?

  • Sure you probably heard somebody tell you that endorphins

  • are released when you exercise, but what does that really mean?

  • Well here's a way to think about it.

  • When you start working out, your brain recognizes it as a moment of stress.

  • As your heart and blood pressure increases, the brain thinks that you're either fighting

  • an enemy or you're fleeing from one. Fight or flight?

  • Protect yourself and your brain from stress

  • you release this protein known as BDNF,

  • brain- derived neurotrophic factor.

  • This is pretty cool stuff, at the same time endorphins,

  • another chemical to fight stress are released by the pituitary gland.

  • Endorphins minimize the discomfort of exercise,

  • they block the feeling of pain, they're even associated with feelings of euphoria.

  • They do something else, the source published in the scientific journal of nature suggests

  • people who exercise have increased grey matter in their brains.

  • That's the brain. But I also wanna let you in on a little secret.

  • Exercise offers a serious self- esteem boost,

  • that could be the endorphins as well.

  • Working out not only changes your physical appearance,

  • but it also affects the way that you see yourself.

  • According to a recent Gallup poll, Americans who exercise most

  • feel the best about their appearance.

  • You don't need space to experience zero gravity.

  • All you need is a jet- liner, a parabola, and voila, you're weightless.

  • A pilot throttles the plane and aims it 45 degrees up,

  • then, he suddenly puts it in a dive and no matter what your stomach does,

  • you're weightless for 27 seconds.

  • It's enough time to shoot parts of a music video if you plan it right.

  • Don't try this aboard your next commercial flight.

  • They are known for it's unique videos,

  • now they're treading in zero gravity in a plane above Russia.

  • For three weeks, they practiced, then performed as the plane did parabolas,

  • climbing until it goes over the hump, creating 27 seconds of weightlessness.

  • Time to open luggage and release a zillion balls.

  • Lead singing Damian Kulash called the whole zero g experience

  • exciting and terrifying.

  • Russia's S7 airline offered OK Go the plane

  • in exchange for using the results in a marketing campaign.

  • The video is made up of 8 periods of weightlessness,

  • with the time in between as the plane repositions edited out.

  • The band members took anti- nausea drugs,

  • but the production crew wanted to go natural.

  • We had about 58 unscheduled regurgitations.

  • But what's a little nausea when paint- filled balloons are spilling their guts.

  • Now Damian himself never actually threw up,

  • but he did pass out after being spun by the flight attendants.

  • Watch Damian start to lose it as his eyes flutter.

  • After five seconds or so, he's regained consciousness.

  • Do you want me to get you some water?

  • No, I want you to get me some gravity!

  • Might not win him Oscars like Gravity,

  • but it's easy to see how their flight of fancy has taken off,

  • getting the band a parabolot of attention,

  • even though accomplishing this had to be on the wing

  • after being waitlisted. I'm Carl Azuz.

  • We're gonna OK Go, and we hope to see you tomorrow.

The unexpected passing of a U. S. Supreme Court Justice leads off our show.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US

February 16, 2016 - CNN Student News with subtitle

  • 2694 81
    VoiceTube posted on 2016/02/17
Video vocabulary