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  • Bad boys, bad boys, what you going to do?

  • Well, this lesson is for you.

  • Okay? Welcome to engVid. I'm James. The lesson I want to do today is on, well, crime and punishment,

  • or in this case, I call it arrested development. I find it very strange when people go to different

  • countries, that they don't get a basic understanding of the law. Now, in most English-speaking

  • countries, what I will teach you today is true. Of course, there'll be exceptions because

  • each country is unique and has different rules and laws, but this basically is the way our

  • law system or legal system works. Okay? And "legal system" means when you will talk to

  • the police if there's a problem, what might happen.

  • So let's go to the board. Oh, sorry. We got E, prisoner E, 666.

  • "I ain't going back, Copper!"

  • Now, before some of you say: "I was told 'ain't' isn't English", we have a video on that, go

  • check it out. Bad grammar from a bad guy. He's a bad worm.

  • So let's see what happened to Mr. E, or how did he end up in this particular position

  • or situation? We're going to go through what will basically happen if you have to talk

  • to the police, and they think you have done something wrong. Remember: If you call the

  • police to help you, this won't happen, but if somebody has said you've done something

  • wrong, this is usually the way it works.

  • So, we'll start off, here. I'm going to mark these things to help you figure out where

  • they sit. So, we're playing a little game, here. What is what? Okay, so the first thing

  • that happens if you meet a policeman and they say... Or policewoman, sorry, a police person,

  • and they say: "Stop." That's number one, and that's what we have here. You know a stop

  • sign means don't move. Okay? Let's make this clear. A stop sign doesn't... It means don't move.

  • So number one thing is stop. They will stop you or ask you to stop moving.

  • You do so.

  • After they ask you to stop, they're going to ask for I.D. For some of you, you'll say:

  • "What is I.D.?" Well, it's identification, sort of like your passport or your country...

  • Some people have identification cards in their country. Funny, in Canada, we don't have this

  • thing. We have drivers' licenses, and we have passports, but we don't have citizenship cards,

  • or-sorry-citizen cards. We use our driver's license. So it might be your citizen card

  • that they would request. If you come to our country, they would ask you for I.D., so you

  • could present your passport or your citizen card. That's probably all you have. So, number

  • two in the process will be asking for your I.D.

  • Now, you notice this is orange and we have this strange word: "rights", and I'm not talking

  • your right hand. In Canada, the United States, Great Britain, New Zealand, Scotland, Wales,

  • they have rights. Or, sorry, you have rights, which mean before you do anything the police

  • say, you are allowed to ask certain questions. So you can say: "I know my rights." By the

  • way, I would never say that to a policeman who stopped you. You're just asking for trouble.

  • But, at the time they ask you to stop or they ask you to give I.D., you can then start using

  • your rights. One of the first things you can say is:

  • "Hi, Officer, what's your name or badge number?"

  • In Canada, they must give it to you. Okay? But be smart, ask nicely, like:

  • "Okay, no problem, Officer. I just want to know: Who am I talking to?

  • I just want to know I'm talking to the law."

  • The officer will then either point to their shoulder where

  • there is a number located, or they'll say their name, which is usually located on the

  • front of their shirt. So: "Officer Johnson, 531 Division." You go: "Thank you, Officer."

  • You can then say this... Remember, each time you're doing this, police don't usually like

  • being questioned, so always be polite. Don't flunk the attitude test. I'll explain that

  • to you after. So then you can say:

  • "Officer, why am I being stopped?"

  • The officer at that time, especially if they ask for your I.D. must tell you why you're being stopped. Okay?

  • This will lead to... Well, we go up to here, being charged, but let's go here first.

  • You can then say, before they do anything else:

  • "Am I under arrest?"

  • If the officer says: "You're not under arrest", you may walk away.

  • You can leave. You can still be polite,

  • and I recommend that, but you don't have to answer any of their questions, because once

  • the officer has told you why he stopped you or she has stopped you, if you are not under

  • arrest, you do not need to speak anymore. If they ask further questions, you can say:

  • "If I'm not under arrest and you want more from me, I need to talk to a lawyer first,

  • because I don't know why I'm standing here."

  • These are your basic rights in Canada, United

  • States, and Great Britain. As I said, each country varies, so be careful. Okay?

  • And always, always, always be polite.

  • Now, let's just say you a bad boy or a bad girl. Well, we've gone past the rights stage,

  • and the stop, and the I.D., they have to tell you what you're charged with. That means you've

  • done something wrong, and that means you cannot walk away from the police at that point. This

  • is called... You say:

  • "Am I being charged with anything?"

  • They must tell you what you have done.

  • "We think you killed somebody.",

  • "We think you stole a car.",

  • "We think you hit someone."

  • At this point, something is going to happen, either one or two things. Oh, this is not

  • the good part. If it's a small thing, and we call it "not criminal", meaning you didn't

  • do anything that they need to put you in jail for, you will get a fine. What kind of things?

  • If you're driving your castal-... Your car a little too fast, or if you drop... Actually,

  • this is true, drop garbage in certain places where you're not supposed to drop your garbage.

  • You don't put it away, you drop it on the floor, the police can walk up to you and say:

  • "I'm going to give you a fine."

  • They will give you a ticket. You'll notice this. And

  • if you can't read this, you shouldn't. This is called fine print, it's very fine, very

  • small. But the fine is clear: Here's what you did, here's the money you pay. Okay? So

  • when we say "fine", it's money you have to pay them. Okay? That's here. That's a good

  • thing, because then you can go free. You get the paper, you pay this later. We'll go into

  • a court afterwards.

  • But if it's not a fine and it's something you've done that's very bad, the police will

  • arrest you. That means they will stop you and say:

  • "You must come with us. You have no choice in that."

  • You can still follow the rights, you've asked this and asked for your

  • lawyer, but you will have to go with them. Arresting is similar to stopping. They're

  • not just stopping you, they're stopping and taking you.

  • Now, once you've been arrested, you can ask for your lawyer. You can also get what's called

  • "bail". It's another way of getting out of, well, jail. We have "bail" and "jail". Jail

  • is where you're going to go. When they arrest you, you go to jail. You will be staying there

  • until you have a court date, which we'll get to. But you can get out if you have bail money.

  • Bail. You'll go: "What is bail?" Well, the simplest way I can explain it is when you

  • have water in one area and you need to move that water to one area to another, we usually

  • take something smaller, and we pick it up, we take it up and we take it out, and let

  • it go. And we call "bailing water". The bailing is taking you out of prison so that you are

  • free. We are removing you and letting you go free. Okay? So you will need bail, which

  • is usually a lot of money so you can actually leave the jail.

  • Are your troubles over? No. That's why there's two parts to this lesson. This is the arrest part.

  • The next one we're going to do is on court and your day in court. What will happen,

  • how you can get out, and if it doesn't work out for you, how bad it can get. Anyway, we're

  • going to go and do... I want to explain rules and law, and do a little quiz with you to

  • make sure you understand these six steps... Six steps that happen, all the way from being

  • stopped to requiring bail. Are you ready?

  • [Snaps]

  • Now, just before we do the quiz, I want to go over something that students ask about:

  • rules versus laws, because sometimes they're exactly the same. Actually, they seem the

  • same, but they are different. Rules are like games. When you play Monopoly or you play

  • any game, like soccer or football or rugby, there are rules. The police will never come

  • when you play these games, and take you and arrest you if you break a rule. Even if you

  • cheat on a test at school, that means not to follow the rules, you won't get arrested,

  • but there are punishments. Laws are a little different. They're more serious;

  • you can get in a lot of trouble.

  • So let's take a look at something basic to help you remember rules vering-... Rules versus

  • laws. In your classrooms, you have rules; in the cities and in countries, we have laws.

  • Rules are personal. You can have your own personal rules. I'm always five minutes early,

  • or I take off my shoes, or please take off your shoes when you come to my house. These

  • are rules. They're flexible. You can take off the shoes, but if you're the President

  • of the United States, I'll let you wear your shoes in my house; it's flexible. Okay? If

  • you're five minutes late, it's okay. It's flexible. There's no punishment, or no trouble

  • or problem for you. Rules are made by people, individual people. All right? You can make

  • them. I can make a rule. People who make games make rules. Anyone can make rules.

  • Oh, sorry, and I should say organizations. For instance, at your company, there are rules. You have

  • a 10-minute break, not a 30-minute break. If you take 15, they cannot call the police

  • on you. That's just too bad, but you did break a rule.

  • And rules have light punishment. If you're a child, you might think rules are terrible,

  • but they are practice for laws, which I'll get into. Where if you do something wrong,

  • like you don't clean your room, there's a punishment. Maybe you don't get to play with

  • your friends. It's a light punishment. Not prison. Yeah. No boom, boom, no. Well, maybe

  • in your house, but most people, no. Okay?

  • Laws are different, they are made by governments. So your city government, your provincial,

  • or your state government, or your country's government, they make laws. They are not flexible.

  • Killing, there is no:

  • "Ah, it was a Tuesday, Bob, and rainy, we understand."

  • You killed, you kill, not flexible. You must face the law. They're made by governments and courts.

  • So your President cannot just make laws. Your President, he or she must go back to the other

  • people in government, talk to them, and then they talk to the courts, and they decide if

  • this is a good law that they can use with the other laws. So it's not just somebody

  • wakes up and says: "We make new laws today."

  • And finally, the police can make you do it. If it's a law, the police can stop you and say:

  • "You must do this now, or you must stop doing this now, or we will take away your freedom and arrest you."

  • Not for rules. Okay? So you basically understand that. Next time

  • your teacher says: "I have a rule", you can say: "It's not a law. I don't have to do it."

  • And they'll have to go: "Yes, for now."

  • All right, now let's go to the board and we're going to do a quick quiz or a fill in the

  • blanks. You did the lesson before. Let's see how well you remember. But just before you

  • do that, I want to give you a little extra, a couple of phrases I didn't give you before

  • that you should be aware of.

  • When you "break the law", it means you do not follow the laws

  • that are written: Do not kill, do not steal. Okay? That means the police can be involved.

  • Breaking the law can also be hitting another person with your car. The police are involved.

  • The law is: Do not hit another car while driving or sitting still. You must not do this, so

  • if you do that, you have broken the law.

  • Now, the police can be a little bit flexible. I kind of lied before, they can say:

  • "Let you off with a warning", which means maybe you did something like, I don't know, you

  • were riding your bicycle, doo-doo-doo-doo-doo, there was a stop sign and you kept riding

  • your bicycle; you didn't stop. The police can say:

  • -"[Whistles] Stop! Come here. There's

  • a stop sign there. Did you see it?"

  • -"Yes, Officer, I did."

  • -"Well, you're supposed to get a $20 fine, but because you were nice, I'm going to let you off with a warning."

  • Meaning: -"Next time I see you, you get a ticket or a fine."

  • -"Whew, thanks, Officer."

  • Okay? That means they let you go.

  • "Under arrest" is this, when they put those... That funny thing I drew, handcuffs on you,

  • and you go to jail. So if I say: "You're under arrest", it means you've done something wrong,

  • I have enough... Or I have enough reasons to take you in. They call the reasons "evidence".

  • So they have enough evidence to take you to jail.

  • And finally, this is probably the most important thing I can tell you: the attitude test.

  • The police, when they stop you, give you a test. It's called "the attitude test". The attitude

  • test goes like this, when a police officer stops you, you don't say: "What?" You say:

  • "Hello, Officer."

  • When the policeman says: "Where...? Do you know how fast you were driving?"

  • You have to say: "No, Officer, I'm not too sure",

  • and then smile again, even though you

  • know you were driving 100 kilometres too fast, because if you say:

  • "Yeah, I've got a speedometer, I can see it",

  • you are going to, what they call:

  • "flunk the attitude test".

  • With the police: Smile and be polite. Think of them as your parents that can really, really hurt

  • you. Okay? So you always have to be good, and don't flunk... "Flunk" means to do poorly

  • on a test. Don't flunk the attitude test, because you will be arrested. I'm sure every

  • policeman is going: "Here, here, thanks for saying it." I'm not doing it for you guys;

  • I'm doing it for the other people. Be polite, be respectful, even though sometimes they

  • may not be respectful with you. Okay? Don't flunk that attitude test,

  • and you won't be under arrest.

  • Okay, time for the quiz.

  • "Mr. E was __________ by Officer James."

  • Let me see, Officer James walks up:

  • "Hey, E, come here. Come here for a second."

  • Now, Mr. E was doing something. What do you think

  • was happening, or what do you think happened if Officer James did something?

  • This always happens first.

  • That's right. "Stopped". Officer James, by saying:

  • "E, come here", stopped him.

  • "Mr. E was stopped by Officer James."

  • "Officer James asked for Mr. E's __________." What?

  • What do you think he would ask for?

  • His phone number? I don't think so. E is cute, but what he probably asked for

  • was his identification.

  • So, he would have to go:

  • "Here, Officer, here's my I.D."

  • So the police would check:

  • "You look like the worm in the window."

  • "Mr. E asked if he was under __________."

  • Do you remember we talked about your rights?

  • You're allowed to ask this question to any police officer, well, in North America, England,

  • Scotland, and Wales.

  • That's right: "if he was under arrest",

  • because if he was under arrest, he must do what the officer says and must stop.

  • If not, he is free to go. So he's

  • doing his legal rights and just checking. Still polite.

  • "No, said Officer James, you didn't _____ _____ _____."

  • What didn't he do? Hmm.

  • That's right: he didn't "break the law". Officer James cannot... See?

  • "Break the law". Cannot arrest Mr. E if he didn't break the law, so