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  • Back after the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday this is CNN STUDENT NEWS. We`ve got a bit

  • of history coming up. First, though, a nasty ice storm in the U.S. northeast. The mayor

  • of Danberry, Connecticut called it Icezilla. Freezing rain glazed parts of the region over

  • the weekend. It made driving extremely dangerous. Some highways had to be closed.

  • One pileup in Pennsylvania involved 60 cars and trucks. One person was killed in the wreck

  • and 30 were hurt.

  • It was just a big load of cars, lot of mayhem and chaos going on.

  • It`s horrible. It`s horrible, man. I`ve been sitting - since 07:30.

  • Several other people died in road accidents. Conditions were treacherous from Connecticut

  • to Maine, much of it caused by black ice, when a think often invisible layer freezes

  • over roads. It caused a pileup on the West Coast as well. Involving dozens of vehicles

  • on Interstate 84 in Oregon.

  • There was an incredible story of survival, though, as his pickup was crushed between

  • two tractor trailers, Keilab Whitby (ph) said he just closed his eyes and prayed. Whitby

  • walked away from this with only a bruise and some scratches.

  • After hearing stories like that and remembering the brutal cold of last winter it might be

  • hard to believe that 2014 was the warmest year recorded since 1880.

  • That`s when scientists started keeping records, and the U.S. government says the average temperatures

  • over land and seas were a fraction higher than ever, by seven hundredths of one degree

  • Fahrenheit. The report said this didn`t really have an impact on snow in the northern hemisphere.

  • It said snow cover for 2014 was about average, despite the slightly warmer overall temperature.

  • In what field did Martin Luther King Jr. earn his doctorate? If you think you know it, shout

  • it out! Was it philosophy, English, education or theology? You`ve got three seconds, go!

  • In 1955 Martin Luther King earned a Ph.D. in systematic theology at Boston University.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • Martin Luther King`s birthday was last Thursday January 15, but since 1986, it`s been celebrated

  • as a U.S. federal holiday on the third Monday in January, which was yesterday.

  • Marches, speeches and parades are all part of the event, demonstrators turned out in

  • some cities to draw attention to the controversial police killings we covered last year.

  • The holiday`s also known as the MLK Day of Service. Dr. King once said, life`s most persistent

  • and urgent question is, what are you doing for others? In that spirit, participants are

  • encourages to volunteer as a way to honor him.

  • CNN`s Natisha Lance (ph) recently visited the Center for Civil and Human Rights. She

  • gives us a sense of the national climate when Dr. King rose to the forefront of the civil

  • rights movement.

  • So in the 1950s, you also had the death of Emmett Till, and how that really sparked the

  • civil rights movement.

  • Because people were outraged that this young black boy was killed for allegations that

  • were untrue and false. And his murder being so unjust and so brutal at the time.

  • Till`s death pushed King and others to develop more unified strategies of protest. That included

  • the bus boycotts and the launch counter sittings across the South.

  • And so, we have the Greensboro sitting at the Woolworth lounge counter, and that`s in

  • the 1960s were students at North Carolina A&T, sat down at white only counters to protest

  • the segregation that was taking place there.

  • Sittings like this were conducted by college students. They endured racial slurs and physical

  • violence just for the right to seat at the whites only counters.

  • The sitting movement was a precursor to the march on Washington. The march inspired many

  • with its peaceful show of solidarity and amazing speeches.

  • But its leaders wanted more.

  • What was the strategy behind it? What were they fighting for? What specifically did they

  • want?

  • For the March on Washington, it was all about jobs and freedom and equality. And what a

  • lot of people don`t know is that there were a set of ten demands that were created, and

  • that one drafted up .

  • There.

  • That were - the protesters wanted to achieve.

  • He shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the State of the Union. That`s

  • one thing the U.S. Constitution requires of the president, and President Obama is scheduled

  • to fulfill that requirement tonight. The address starts at 9 p.m. Eastern, you can watch it

  • live on CNN. It`s followed by the Republican response which will be given this year by

  • Senator Joni Ernst.

  • The timing, the fact that it`s televised, the opposing party`s response. None of that

  • is required by the Constitution. What we see each year is mostly American tradition.

  • Mr. Speaker. Mr. Vice President.

  • Distinguished members .

  • of the United States Congress.

  • Members of the Supreme Court.

  • Distinguished guests.

  • My fellow Americans.

  • I can report of you.

  • The state of the union .

  • is strong.

  • And think for a minute how far .

  • We have come.

  • In 200 years.

  • We find ourselves challenged by new problems.

  • In this country.

  • At home.

  • And abroad.

  • There`s the (INAUDIBLE) of us.

  • Vigilance.

  • Determination.

  • And dedication.

  • We must rise.

  • To make a nation.

  • Better

  • Than even we have.

  • Ever none.

  • For the role .

  • It has been .

  • Long.

  • This is not .

  • Going to be .

  • Easy.

  • We have ..

  • Only began .

  • The will .

  • And enough patience.

  • This job.

  • Together.

  • We made money (ph) different kinds of strength.

  • Military.

  • Economic.

  • Political.

  • And Morrow.

  • Nothing is impossible.

  • They create .

  • It is beyond our reach.

  • Glory.

  • Well, that would be too great.

  • We are .

  • Americans.

  • Hard .

  • As something.

  • Larger.

  • Then our cells.

  • God bless you.

  • You win.

  • The United States of America.

  • Thank you very much.

  • First two schools mentioned today are from Washington State and Massachusetts. Why? Because

  • of the Super Bowl.

  • Kalles Jr. High Schools is in Puyallup, Washington. It`s the home of the Tilis (ph). First time,

  • we have had that mascots. We mentioned some cougars before, but never the ones from Massachusetts.

  • These cats are from John F. Kennedy Middle School.

  • And in Hunter North Dakota, good to see the jaguars. They are at northern (INAUDIBLE)

  • school, and they round out today`s roll.

  • We told you last week how the Falcon 9 rocket, that recently carried a private capsule in

  • the space, didn`t land as it should have. It turns out one of the rockets` fins ran

  • out of hydraulic fluid. That caused it to descend at about 45 degree angle, explode

  • on impact and fire debris out in the Atlantic Ocean, where the landing pad was located.

  • The rocket did reach its target, SpaceX is planning to try again, reusable rockers would

  • save the company a fortune. The rocket also got the dragon space capsule in the orbit.

  • It`s successfully ducked where the international space station last week.

  • One item had brought the astronauts mustard. They`d run out of condiments, but there are

  • even more random items aboard.

  • More than 5,000 of equipment was just sent to the International Space Station and while

  • most of it was normal stuff like food, equipment, even Christmas presents for the astronauts.

  • Some unusual items also hitched a ride to space.

  • And lift off .

  • Space .

  • Fruit flies. There was pesky bugs that drive you insane and seemed to be just about everywhere,

  • are now even in space.

  • Apparently, the immune systems of the Carmen fruit fly are similar to those of humans.

  • By studying how fruit flies immune system respond to space flight, scientists hope to

  • understand how microgravity environments affect our own bodies.

  • Flatworms are now also in space. They are able to regenerate their own cells as they

  • age or become damaged. Scientists wants to see how the self-feeling mechanism operates

  • in microgravity. To understand how wounds heal in space, and roundworms, scientists

  • will be testing how roundworms respond to the salmonella virus.

  • They hope to better understand how humans are susceptible to getting infections while

  • in Orbit.

  • Now, not all of things that were sent up were creepy and crawly, there was also an IMAX

  • movie camera. Let`s hope that footage is in 3D. This isn`t the first time odd items have

  • been sent to space. Astronauts are able to make requests and also bring personal items

  • with them: Legos, fruitcakes, even props for a YouTube video have experienced constant

  • freefall.

  • Is it weird that I`m kind of jealous of a fruitcake?

  • Never good idea for a security guard to fall asleep on the job. But when that happens at

  • a zoo, there can be trouble afoot. What we`ve got here is failure to keep three rhinos in

  • the Safari area of an Israeli zoo. They made it all the way out to the parking lot before

  • some other workers were able to coral the beasts and bring them back to their habitat.

  • The guard lost his job, the rhinos - that`s harder to say, maybe they thought a good run

  • would be tons of fun. Maybe they just wanted to go shopping at Rhinoceros. After that fit

  • of hopping it so, we`ll zookeepers let that happen again? There is NO - YEAH. I`M Carl

  • Azuz. CNN STUDENTS NEWS is charging back. Hear you away tomorrow.

Back after the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday this is CNN STUDENT NEWS. We`ve got a bit

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CNN Student News January 20, 2015

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