Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hello.

  • Welcome to Living English.

  • In today's episode we'll look at words you can use to make plans...

  • ... and invite someone to your house.

  • And we'll be looking at how to talk about the future...

  • ... and what is going to happen.

  • Remember in our last episode of 'Sisters and Brothers'...

  • ... Anne told John the private detective about what happened to her brother.

  • Today she is at Sarah's office.

  • Here's 'Sisters and Brothers'.

  • Um. It's very smooth.

  • Good flavor too.

  • It sounds well in restaurants, yeah?

  • I think they [...] so well at seven o'clock.

  • [...] very popular [...].

  • Um.

  • [...] to understand [...] Singapore.

  • Thank you.

  • [...] to know what my wines like.

  • So.

  • Are you enjoying the city?

  • Well it's very nice.

  • What are you going to do tomorrow?

  • I don't know. I'll probably stay in the hotel and relax.

  • Why don't you come to lunch with us at home?

  • Oh, thank you but you have your family.

  • Yes, and they want to meet you.

  • We're going to have roast chicken.

  • Traditional Aussie food.

  • Um, sounds good.

  • Alright, I'll come.

  • Great.

  • What time?

  • We eat at about one o'clock. So about twelve thirty?

  • I'll show you the house.

  • Okay, thank you.

  • I'll get my brother to pick you up.

  • No that's okay. I'll get a taxi.

  • Alright then.

  • That's settled.

  • Let's look at how Sarah asks Anne about her plans.

  • What are you going to do tomorrow?

  • I don't know. I'll probably stay in the hotel and relax.

  • Sarah asks 'What are you going to do?'

  • 'Going to' is used to talk about future plans.

  • Repeat the phrase with the clip.

  • What are you going to do tomorrow?

  • Sarah invites Anne to her house.

  • What are they going to have for lunch?

  • Listen.

  • We're going to have roast chicken.

  • Traditional Aussie food.

  • They're going to have roast chicken.

  • Let's practice 'going to'.

  • First the question.

  • What are you going to do tomorrow?

  • Let's ask the question with different subjects.

  • First 'he'.

  • What is he going to do tomorrow?

  • They.

  • What are they going to do tomorrow?

  • Now let's look at the answer.

  • Anne is going to relax.

  • So she would say 'I'm going to relax'.

  • You try answering the question.

  • What are you going to do tomorrow?

  • I'm going to relax.

  • What is she going to do tomorrow?

  • She is going to relax.

  • What are we going to do tomorrow?

  • We're going to relax.

  • What are they going to do tomorrow?

  • They are going to relax.

  • There's another way of talking about the future.

  • To use the word 'will'.

  • Listen again to what Anne says about her plans for tomorrow.

  • What are you going to do tomorrow?

  • I don't know. I'll probably stay in the hotel and relax.

  • Anne says 'I'll probably stay in the hotel'.

  • "I'll" is short for "I will".

  • This is another way of talking about the future.

  • I will do something.

  • Listen to see how many times you can hear "I'll" in this next clip.

  • We're going to have roast chicken.

  • Traditional Aussie food.

  • Um, sounds good.

  • Alright, I'll come.

  • Great.

  • What time?

  • We eat at about one o'clock. So about twelve thirty?

  • I'll show you the house.

  • Okay, thank you.

  • I'll get my brother to pick you up.

  • No that's okay. I'll get a taxi.

  • So there were four 'wills'.

  • I'll come.

  • I'll show you the house.

  • I'll get my brother to pick you up.

  • And 'I'll get a taxi'.

  • And as we've seen before on Living English 'I will' becomes "I'll".

  • So when you use 'will'...

  • ... and when you use 'going to'.

  • Notice that all of these actions in the future are single actions.

  • I'll get a taxi.

  • I'll show you the house.

  • We use 'will' for a definite single action in the future.

  • We use 'going to' for less definite or longer actions.

  • What are you going to do tomorrow?

  • Now let's look at how Sarah invites Anne to her house.

  • Why don't you come to lunch with us at home?

  • She says 'Why don't you come to lunch?'

  • She doesn't really want to know why Anne doesn't come.

  • She wants Anne to come.

  • She is inviting her to come.

  • Practice with the clip.

  • Why don't you come to lunch with us at home?

  • Now try asking with some different invitations.

  • Suggest come to dinner.

  • Why don't you come to dinner?

  • Try this chicken.

  • Why don't you try this chicken?

  • Go home.

  • Why don't you go home?

  • Ring me tomorrow.

  • Why don't you ring me tomorrow?

  • All of these are examples of making a suggestion.

  • So I'd say why don't you ring me tomorrow?

  • I want you to ring me tomorrow.

  • I'll ring you tomorrow if you like

  • Hello Michelle.

  • Hello.

  • What are we going to talk about today?

  • Well, I've brought my calendar.

  • So we can talk about days in the future.

  • First let's review the days of the week.

  • You say them at home too.

  • Monday.

  • Tuesday.

  • Wednesday.

  • Thursday.

  • Friday.

  • Saturday.

  • Sunday.

  • Brenton, we need to make an appointment to discuss the program.

  • When can we meet?

  • When are you free?

  • But I'm free after this.

  • Um. No, I'm [...] today.

  • What about tomorrow?

  • I'm busy tomorrow. I'm working.

  • What about Wednesday?

  • I'm sorry. I'm going [...] Wednesday.

  • What about Saturday?

  • Oh, no. On Saturday I'm going to do the shopping.

  • Well we can't make this week.

  • What about next week?

  • Well I'm very busy next week but...

  • ... I can see you on Monday.

  • Monday [...].

  • It's Monday today.

  • So I'll see you next Monday.

  • Next Monday, in a week's time.

  • And what time?

  • How about ten o'clock?

  • Okay. I'll see you at ten o'clock next Monday morning.

  • That was very difficult.

  • Let's look at how we talk about future days.

  • First today.

  • You would say "I'll see you today"...

  • ... or "I'll see you later today".

  • If it was in the afternoon we could say 'I'll see you this afternoon'.

  • Or if it was in the evening 'I'll see you this evening'.

  • Let's say today is Monday.

  • If I can see you on Tuesday I would say...

  • ... "I'll see you tomorrow".

  • If I can see you on Wednesday I could say...

  • ... "I'll see you the day after tomorrow".

  • Or I could just say "I'll see you on Wednesday".

  • We use 'on' before the name of any day.

  • And notice how the days have a capital letter.

  • If our appointment is in the week we are in now...

  • ... I would call it 'this week'.

  • But if it's next week than I say...

  • ... "I'll see you next week".

  • The same goes for the month.

  • 'This month' is the month that is happening now.

  • Next month is the month after.

  • Or the year - this year, next year.

  • And if I want to say a particular manth I use 'in'.

  • I'll see you in July.

  • I'll see you in December.

  • And when we say a particular time we use 'at'.

  • I'll see you at two o'clock.

  • I'll see you at half-past four.

  • But if we want to say how far in the future the appointment is we use 'in'.

  • I'll see you in ten minutes.

  • I'll see you in two hours.

  • I'll see you in a week.

  • I'll see you in a month.

  • It seems complicated Michelle.

  • Not really. We just have to remember whether to use 'on', 'at', or 'in'.

  • Next practice.

  • I'll say a time and you say...

  • ... I'll see you on, at, or in that time.

  • You try one Brenton.

  • Okay.

  • A week.

  • I'll see you in a week.

  • Perfect.

  • Now you try at home.

  • A month.

  • I'll see you in a month.

  • Six o'clock.

  • I'll see you at six o'clock.

  • January.

  • I'll see you in January.

  • Thursday.

  • I'll see you on Thursday.

  • Two years.

  • I'll see you in two years.

  • This afternoon.

  • I'll see you this afternoon.

  • That was a trick one.

  • Remember we can also use 'this' before the words morning,

  • ... afternoon,

  • ... evening,

  • ... week,

  • ... month,

  • ... or year.

  • We can say 'this year' or 'next year'.

  • This week or 'next week'.

  • And so on.

  • And that's about all we have today Brenton

  • But before we see the story again there's one thing that I don't understand.

  • What's that Michelle?

  • Let's watch the end of the clip.

  • I'll get my brother to pick you up.

  • No that's okay. I'll get a taxi.

  • Alright then.

  • That's settled.

  • Why does Sarah want her brother to pick Anne up?

  • Can't she walk?

  • No Michelle, he isn't really going to carry her.

  • To pick someone up is to give them a lift in your car.

  • Oh!

  • Are you going to pick me up for our meeting?

  • No.

  • Oh.

  • That's all we have time for today.

  • We'll see you next time when Anne goes to lunch at Sarah's house.

  • And we'll meet Sarah's brother.

  • Hope you can watch then.

  • And I'll see you on Monday.

  • At ten o'clock.

  • Goodbye.

Hello.