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  • Hello.

  • And welcome again to Living English...

  • ... where we learn how to speak English for work, travel, or study.

  • In each program we look at a short drama...

  • ... then practisse our English.

  • So let's see today's episode of 'Sisters and Brothers'.

  • Remember in the last episode Anne arrived from Singapore.

  • She met her business partner Sarah.

  • Now she is checking in at her hotel.

  • Thank you very much for picking me up.

  • You're very welcome.

  • Will you be alright here?

  • Thanks. I'll be fine.

  • And thank you Mark, for helping with my heavy bag.

  • Don't...

  • Don't mention it.

  • Alright then.

  • Nice to meet you finally.

  • I'll meet you tomorrow.

  • Nice to meet you too.

  • Goodbye.

  • Good morning. Would you like to check in?

  • - Yes, please. - And your name?

  • Anne Lee.

  • Yes. [...] please.

  • How long will you be staying?

  • Two weeks.

  • [...].

  • [...] business.

  • Will you need a hire car?

  • No, thank you.

  • Will you need a map of the city?

  • Maybe later.

  • Will you want a newspaper in the morning?

  • - No, thank you. - Okay.

  • And how will you be paying Ms Lee?

  • Credit card.

  • Thank you.

  • And here's your key.

  • Room 309.

  • Enjoy your stay Ms Lee.

  • Thank you. I hope I will.

  • In that episode we saw how to say 'thank you'.

  • Anne has a reply.

  • Let's have another look.

  • Thank you very much for picking me up.

  • You're very welcome.

  • Anne says 'Thank you very much'.

  • This is a polite way of thanking someone.

  • Try saying...

  • ... 'Thank you very much for picking me up'...

  • ... with the clip.

  • You're very welcome.

  • Thank you very much for picking me up.

  • You're very welcome.

  • Sarah says in reply...

  • ... 'You're very welcome'.

  • This is a polite reply.

  • Try at home with the clip.

  • Thank you very much for picking me up.

  • Thank you very much for picking me up.

  • You're very welcome.

  • 'You're very welcome'...

  • ... or just...

  • ... 'You're welcome'...

  • ... is what we usually say when someone thanks us.

  • "You're" is short for "you are".

  • You are welcome.

  • Now listen to how Anne says 'thank you' to Mark.

  • And thank you Mark, for helping with my heavy bag.

  • Don't...

  • She just says 'thank you'.

  • It is another way of saying 'thank you' for everyday sayings.

  • Listen carefully.

  • Will you be alright here?

  • Thanks. I'll be fine.

  • Anne says 'thanks' to a polite question.

  • For small things like this we just say 'thanks'.

  • In our next clip listen to what Mark replies when Anne says 'thank you'.

  • And thank you Mark, for helping with my heavy bag.

  • Don't...

  • Don't mention it.

  • Mark says 'Don't mention it'.

  • He's politely saying that Anne doesn't need to say 'thank you'.

  • 'Don't' is a way of saying 'do not'.

  • And 'mention' means 'say'.

  • Now try saying it yourself.

  • And thank you Mark, for helping with my heavy bag.

  • Don't...

  • And thank you Mark, for helping with my heavy bag.

  • Don't...

  • Don't mention it.

  • In that episode we also saw how to say 'goodbye'.

  • Nice to meet you too.

  • Goodbye.

  • She says 'goodbye' as she leaves.

  • It's a formal way of saying that you're going.

  • Practise saying 'goodbye' with the clip.

  • Nice to meet you too.

  • Nice to meet you too.

  • Goodbye.

  • When you get to know someone a little better...

  • ... you can say 'see you latter'.

  • Practise saying it after me.

  • See you later.

  • See you later.

  • Now let's look at how to ask questions about what you're going to do.

  • How long will you be staying?

  • Two weeks.

  • How long will you be staying?

  • We use the word 'will' to ask about the future.

  • Now listen to another question that uses 'will' to ask about the future.

  • Listen carefully.

  • The hotel clerk speaks very fast.

  • Will you want a newspaper in the morning?

  • Here's another question from the clerk.

  • Will you need a map of the city?

  • And here's another one.

  • Will you need a hire car?

  • All these questions are about what Anne will do in the future.

  • They ask about her plans.

  • They ask about what she intends to do...

  • ... or what she is going to do.

  • For example the question...

  • ... 'Will you need a hire car?'...

  • ... is asking about the future.

  • About what Anne might need in the next few days.

  • Now listen carefully in our next clip...

  • ... for another use of 'will' to ask about the future.

  • Thank you very much for picking me up.

  • You're very welcome.

  • Will you be alright here?

  • Will you be alright here?

  • Sarah wants to know how Anne will be in the next few days...

  • ... while she is staying at the hotel.

  • In the next clip see how the word 'will' is used...

  • ... when you are not asking a question.

  • Here's your key.

  • Room 309.

  • Enjoy your stay Ms Lee.

  • Thank you. I hope I will.

  • Anne replies...

  • ... 'I hope I will'...

  • ... to the clerk telling her to enjoy her stay in the hotel.

  • She hopes that in the future she will enjoy stay in the hotel.

  • If you are not asking a question...

  • ... you use the word 'will' after words such as 'she'.

  • She will need a hire car.

  • I.

  • I will need a hire car.

  • And you.

  • You will need a hire car.

  • This sort of words...

  • ... 'I', 'she', 'you' are called pronouns.

  • We use 'will' before pronouns in questions.

  • So if I say...

  • ... 'Will you need a hire car?"...

  • ... it's a question.

  • Listen to the difference.

  • Will you need a hire car?

  • You will need a hire car.

  • Can you tell which one of these is a question?

  • Wiil you enjoy your stay?

  • Or.

  • You will enjoy your stay.

  • 'Will' comes before 'you'.

  • So 'Wiil you enjoy your stay?' is a question.

  • It's asking about something in the future.

  • When 'will' comes after 'you'...

  • ... you're just saying what you think is going to happen.

  • You will enjoy your stay.

  • And here's Michelle.

  • Hello Michelle. How are you?

  • I'm fine. Thanks Brenton.

  • Hello everyone.

  • What will we talk about today?

  • We'll talk about how to pay for things...

  • ... and more about the word 'will'.

  • Now Brenton.

  • You're going to a holiday to [...].

  • I am?

  • Let's pretend.

  • I've brought some things here.

  • Ask me if you need them.

  • And you ask at home too using 'will I need'.

  • Remember?

  • It's hot in [...] and there's lots of beaches.

  • Alright.

  • Sunscreen.

  • Will I need sunscreen?

  • What do you think?

  • Yes, you will.

  • Traveller's cheques.

  • Will I need traveller's cheques?

  • Yes, you will.

  • Sunglasses.

  • Will I need sunglasses?

  • Yes, you will.

  • Teddy bear.

  • Will I need a teddy bear?

  • No, you won't.

  • I might.

  • Now you answer the questions.

  • Will he need sunscreen?

  • Yes, he will.

  • Will he need sunglasses?

  • Yes, he will.

  • Will he need a teddy bear?

  • No, he won't

  • Oh!

  • Now let's look at the saying when Anne pays for her hotel room.

  • How does she pay?

  • And how will you be paying Ms Lee?

  • Credit card.

  • Anne pays by credit card.

  • How else can you pay for things?

  • Well, you can pay in cash.

  • So we say you pay by credit card or in cash.

  • How else can you pay?

  • Well you can often pay by EFTPOS.

  • EFTPOS stands for Electronic Funds Transfer at Point of Sale.

  • You use your ATM card for this.

  • And you can pay by cheque.

  • In America it's spelled differently.

  • So we say you can pay...

  • ... in cash,

  • ... by credit card,

  • ... by EFTPOS,

  • ... or by cheque.

  • Practise saying 'by credit card' with the clip.

  • And how will you be paying Ms Lee?

  • And how will you be paying Ms Lee?

  • Credit card.

  • Did you hear what the clerk called Anne Lee in that clip?

  • Listen again.

  • And how will you be paying Ms Lee?

  • Credit card.

  • She used her formal title 'Ms Lee'.

  • What's your formal title Brenton?

  • My formal title is Mr Whittle.

  • [...] mister.

  • We say 'mister' before our last name.

  • My full name is Brenton Whittle.

  • So I'm mister Whittle.

  • So Mark Taylor in our film is Mr Taylor.

  • Yes.

  • And are you Ms Crowden?

  • I might be.

  • I might not be.

  • What do you mean?

  • Women can be called Ms, Miss, or Mrs.

  • They all [...] are like each other?

  • Yes, but they are different.

  • You can only be called 'Miss' if you're not married...

  • ... and 'Mrs' if you are married.

  • Are you a Miss or a Mrs?

  • I'd like to be called Ms.

  • Any woman can be called Ms.

  • Just like any man can be called Mr.

  • Practise these after me.