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  • Hello.

  • Welcome to Living English.

  • On today's program we're going to look at how to describe people.

  • We'll also learn how to make an offer.

  • We'll start as usual with our drama.

  • In the last episode Anne told Sarah about her missing brother.

  • So let's see what Anne and Sarah are talking about now.

  • Can I help you find your brother?

  • You're very kind.

  • It's not your problem.

  • I want to help. What can I do?

  • Well.

  • Maybe [...]. Copy for me this photograph.

  • Sure, I'd love to.

  • Anything.

  • He's very good-looking.

  • Such a nice smile.

  • Is he tall?

  • Fairly tall.

  • He looks very fit.

  • [...] sport.

  • Me too.

  • What's he doing? Is he a student?

  • He's not really academic.

  • He's clever, but he prefers to do things with his hands.

  • He sounds nice.

  • I'm looking forward to meeting him.

  • Let's listen again...

  • ... to how Sarah offered to help Anne.

  • Can I help you find your brother?

  • You're very kind.

  • It's not your problem.

  • I want to help. What can I do?

  • First Sarah asks if she can help.

  • Can I help you find your brother?

  • Practice this phrase with Sarah on the tape.

  • Can I help you find your brother?

  • Now practice with some other examples offering to help.

  • Wash the dishes.

  • Can I help you wash the dishes?

  • Do the shopping.

  • Can I help you do the shopping?

  • With anything.

  • Can I help you with anything?

  • It's polite to not immediately accept an offer.

  • Listen to how Anne does this.

  • You're very kind.

  • It's not your problem.

  • First Anne thanks Sarah for offering to help.

  • She says 'You're very kind'.

  • Try that with the clip.

  • You're very kind.

  • And then she says.

  • It's not your problem.

  • It's her problem.

  • And Sarah doesn't have to help her.

  • Now listen to Sarah making offer in a way that Anne finds hard to refuse.

  • I want to help. What can I do?

  • 'What can I do?'...

  • ... is another way of offering to help with anything.

  • Try repeating this phrase with Sarah.

  • What can I do?

  • And so Sarah's offer is accepted.

  • It's time now to take a closer look at the words called adjectives.

  • Adjectives are used to describe people and things.

  • They're the words that tell you what color something is.

  • For example...

  • ... here's a ball.

  • It's red.

  • So it's a red ball.

  • Adjectives can tell how big or small something is.

  • This is a big ball.

  • You use adjectives to express your opinion about something.

  • What a beautiful ball.

  • Of what type it is.

  • This is a plastic ball.

  • Adjectives often go before the noun...

  • ... or the thing they describe.

  • Let's look at today's story and see where Sarah describes Anne's brother.

  • He's very good-looking.

  • Such a nice smile.

  • Is he tall?

  • Sarah described Anne's brother's smile.

  • She said 'He had a nice smile'.

  • She used two other adjectives in that clip.

  • Listen again and try to hear what they are.

  • He's very good-looking.

  • Such a nice smile.

  • Is he tall?

  • They are 'good-looking' and 'tall'.

  • Adjectives don't always come before the noun or the thing described.

  • They can also come after a verb.

  • Anne's brother is good-looking.

  • He's handsome.

  • And Sahar asks 'Is he tall?'

  • What other words they used to describe Anne's brother?

  • He's not really academic.

  • He's clever, but he prefers to do things with his hands.

  • The two adjectives used to describe Anne's brother are 'clever' and 'academic'.

  • Let's listen to 'academic' again.

  • He's not really academic.

  • Someone who is academic is someone who likes to study.

  • But Anne's brother is not academic.

  • He doesn't like to study.

  • Try saying 'He's not really academic' with Anne.

  • He's not really academic.

  • He's clever, but he prefers to do things with his hands.

  • Anne's brother doesn't like to study.

  • But he's clever.

  • She means that he's smarter after study if he wants to.

  • 'He's clever' is short for 'He is clever'.

  • We don't say 'He clever'.

  • We say 'He's clever'.

  • Is, was, are, and were are all forms of the verb to be.

  • When we use an adjective after the noun that's describing...

  • ... we use a form of the verb to be straight aftert the noun or pronoun.

  • Try this after me.

  • I.

  • I'm clever.

  • You.

  • You're clever.

  • She.

  • She's clever.

  • We.

  • We're clever.

  • They.

  • They're clever.

  • Listen for another example in this next clip.

  • You're very kind.

  • You're very kind.

  • 'Kind' is the adjective.

  • 'You're' is short for 'you are'.

  • You're very kind.

  • In this clip listen for what happens when we use an adjective after a pronoun in a question.

  • Is he tall?

  • In questions we change the word order.

  • 'He is tall'...

  • ... is a statement.

  • 'Is he tall?' is a question.

  • There're some other verbs that we use when an adjective comes after the thing it describes.

  • Listen for one here.

  • He looks very fit.

  • He looks very fit.

  • 'Fit' is the adjective meaning healthy.

  • He looks very fit because you can see that he's very fit.

  • Here's another.

  • He sounds nice.

  • He sounds nice.

  • Nice is the adjective.

  • He sounds nice because Anne is describing him to Sarah.

  • Try saying 'He sounds nice' with Sarah.

  • He sounds nice.

  • It's time to say 'hello' to Michelle.

  • Hello Brenton.

  • You're nice today.

  • Oh, thank you.

  • What have you been explaining to our viewers?

  • How we use adjectives to describe people.

  • Maybe you'd like to describe me.

  • How would we describe Michelle?

  • Is she tall, or short?

  • I'm not very tall.

  • But you're not very short.

  • So I'm not very tall.

  • But I'm not very short either.

  • I'm of medium height.

  • How else can we describe someone?

  • Well, we can describe the build.

  • Whether they are thin or fat.

  • Would you say I'm fat Brenton?

  • No, but I'd say you're slim.

  • Thank you.

  • But what would you say?

  • You can describe someone's complexion.

  • The complexion is the color of someone's skin.

  • Whether they are light or dark.

  • Michelle is fair.

  • The skin color is light.

  • What else can you describe about someone?

  • You can describe the color of their hair and their eyes.

  • What can you say about Michelle's hair?

  • She has fair hair.

  • We could say she has blonde hair.

  • Her hair is blonde.

  • What can you say about her eyes?

  • She has blue eyes.

  • And we can also say "Her eyes are blue'.

  • So help me describe Michelle again.

  • What about her height?

  • She's of medium height.

  • Her height is medium.

  • What about her build?

  • She's slim.

  • Her build is slim.

  • What about her complexion?

  • She's fair.

  • She has a fair complexion.

  • What about her hair?

  • She has blonde hair.

  • Her hair is blonde.

  • What about her eyes?

  • She has blue eyes.

  • Her eyes are blue.

  • That's enough about me.

  • Now Brenton, let's see if our viewers can help me describe you.

  • How would you describe Brenton?

  • Is he tall or short?

  • He's tall.

  • What about his build?

  • Is he thin, fat, or of medium build?

  • He's of medium build.

  • What about his complexion?

  • Is he dark or fair?

  • He's dark.

  • What about his hair color?

  • He has dark hair.

  • Is his hair black?

  • No, unfortunately it's a bit grey.

  • What about his eyes?

  • He has dark brown eyes.

  • And what's another way of saying that?

  • His eyes are dark brown.

  • Now listen again to Anne using the adjective 'kind'.

  • You're very kind.

  • Anne doesn't just say that Sarah is kind.

  • She says 'You're very kind'.

  • You can use words like this in phrasal adjectives.

  • Remember I said my hair was a bit grey.

  • You can also describe other things such as the temperatur.

  • How hot is it?

  • It's a bit hot.

  • It's fairly hot.

  • It's very hot.

  • And you can also use 'not' in front of 'very'.

  • She's not very tall.

  • Alright, [...] said that.

  • Look at how Sarah uses the word 'very' to describe Anne's brother.

  • He's very good-looking.

  • Am I very good-looking?

  • You're fairly good-looking.

  • Oh.

  • Listen to how Anne says how tall her brother is.

  • Is he tall?

  • Fairly tall.

  • He is not very tall.

  • He is fairly tall.

  • What's another way of saying 'fairly tall' Brenton?

  • You could say 'quite tall'.

  • That means that he's tall but not very tall.

  • I'm fairly tired now Michelle.

  • It must be time for us to go.

  • I'm quite tired myself.

  • In our next show we'll be looking at days...

  • ... and how to plan a day act with someone.

  • Until then goodbye.

  • Goodbye.

Hello.

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A2 AU tall sarah describe clever brother academic

Living English - Episode 11 - Let me help