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  • Hello.

  • Welcome to Living English.

  • Today we're looking at directions.

  • How do you ask the directions when you're in a strange city?

  • Remember from last episode...

  • ... Anne has an appointment with a private detective.

  • Now she has to find his office.

  • Let's see how she goes in today's episode of 'Sisters and Brothers'.

  • Excuse me.

  • Yes.

  • Could you tell me how to get to Mitshell Street?

  • Yes, you...

  • You're going the wrong way.

  • You need to go straight along here...

  • ... past the silver balls.

  • Turn left and it's the second on the right.

  • Opposite the Town Hall.

  • Thank you very much.

  • You're welcome.

  • Excuse me.

  • Yes.

  • I'm looking for number 23.

  • Barbour's Private Investigator.

  • Over there, next to trees.

  • - Thank you. - Good luck.

  • [...].

  • Come in.

  • Sorry.

  • Yes. Any time.

  • Oh, yes. [...].

  • Must go now.

  • And goodbye.

  • Ms [...]. Julia.

  • Bye.

  • Mister Barbour?

  • John, John. [...] private investigator.

  • And you must be Ms Lee.

  • Please sit doown.

  • Now.

  • What can I do for you Ms Lee?

  • Could you find him for me?

  • Who's the man on the photograph...

  • ... we'll find out in the next episode.

  • But first let's look again at how Anne asks for directions.

  • - Excuse me. - Yes?

  • Could you tell me how to get to Mitshell Street?

  • Anne says 'Excuse me'.

  • This is polite.

  • Because the woman is a strainger.

  • Let's practise that.

  • Make sure you say 'excuse' and not 'scuse'.

  • Excuse me.

  • How does Anne ask for direction?

  • Could you tell me how to get to Mitshell Street?

  • Anne asks politely for directions.

  • She says 'Could you tell me how to get to'...

  • ... where she wants to go.

  • Let's try at home with some different places.

  • First Smith Street.

  • Ask how to get to Smith Street.

  • Could you tell me how to get to Smith Street?

  • The post office.

  • Could you tell me how to get to the post office?

  • The airport.

  • Could you tell me how to get to the airport?

  • Now let's listen to the directions.

  • Yes, you...

  • You're going the wrong way.

  • You need to go straight along here...

  • ... past the silver balls.

  • Turn left and it's the second on the right.

  • Opposite the Town Hall.

  • Thank you very much.

  • You're welcome.

  • We'll look at some of those words a bit later.

  • Anne asks someone else for directions.

  • Watch how she asks this time.

  • Excuse me.

  • Yes.

  • I'm looking for number 23.

  • Barbour's Private Investigator.

  • Anne says what she is looking for.

  • She says...

  • ... 'I'm looking for number 23.'

  • This is the street number.

  • You try saying this with the clip.

  • Excuse me.

  • Yes.

  • I'm looking for number 23.

  • Anne is talking about what she is doing now.

  • She is looking for something.

  • "I'm looking for" is short for "I am looking for".

  • This is called the Present Continuous Tense.

  • We use it for actions which continue.

  • Let's practise.

  • Use 'I'm looking for' with these words.

  • The post office.

  • I'm looking for the post office.

  • The supermarket.

  • I'm looking for the supermarket.

  • Look at what happens when instead of 'I' we use other words.

  • Anne's looking for number 23.

  • So what's Anne looking for?

  • Answer using 'she's'.

  • She's looking for number 23.

  • What's he looking for?

  • He's looking for number 23.

  • What are you looking for?

  • You're looking for number 23.

  • And what are they looking for?

  • They're looking for number 23.

  • Everybody is looking for number 23.

  • Look at how we write and say these.

  • Say it after me.

  • I'm looking.

  • He is looking.

  • She is looking.

  • It's looking.

  • You're looking.

  • We're looking.

  • They're looking.

  • Notice how we use 'am' with 'I'.

  • I am looking.

  • But we usually say 'I'm looking'.

  • 'Is' is used with 'he', 'she', and 'it'.

  • He is looking.

  • But we usually say 'He's looking'.

  • 'Are' is used with 'you', 'we', and 'they'.

  • They are looking.

  • Finally look at how John asks Anne what she wants.

  • What can I do for you Ms Lee?

  • He asks what he can do for her.

  • He means what does she want him to do.

  • Try at home with the clip.

  • What can I do for you Ms Lee?

  • Come in.

  • Brenton [...]?

  • You must be Michelle. Please sit down.

  • Thank you.

  • What can I do for you Michelle?

  • You can help me practise my card checking.

  • What do I have to do?

  • Pock three cards.

  • Put them face up on the table.

  • So we have an Ace, a Queen, and a Ten.

  • Where's the Queen?

  • In the middle.

  • The Queen is in the middle.

  • Where's the Ace?

  • On the left.

  • The Ace is on the left.

  • And where's the Ten?

  • On the right.

  • The Ten is on the right.

  • Now you try at home.

  • I'll just mix them around a bit.

  • Now look at the cards and tell me.

  • Where is the Ace?

  • That's right.

  • The Ace is on the right.

  • Where is the Ten?

  • The Ten is in the middle.

  • And where is the Queen?

  • The Queen is on the left.

  • Now Brenton.

  • I'm going to turn the cards face down...

  • ... and we'll see if you can remember where the Queen is.

  • Watch carefully.

  • Now where is the Queen?

  • - Um. - What do you think?

  • Is it on the left?

  • On the right?

  • Or in the middle?

  • I think it's on the left.

  • Let's have a look.

  • Oh no, that's the Ten.

  • I think the Queen is in the middle.

  • Sorry.

  • Let's look again at our episode of 'Sisters and Brothers'.

  • And see how many words you can hear describing where things are.

  • You need to go straight along here...

  • ... past the silver balls.

  • Turn left and it's the second on the right.

  • Opposite the Town Hall.

  • The woman tells Anne to go straight along that is 'don't turn'.

  • Then she says it's past the silver balls.

  • It is further along [...] silver balls in the same direction.

  • She tells Anne to turn left.

  • And then she says 'It's the second on the right'.

  • She means Anne should turn to the right at the second street she comes through.

  • Finally the woman says 'It's opposite the Town Hall'.

  • That is it is directly across the street from the Town Hall.

  • Look at another part of the story.

  • Over there, next to trees.

  • The place Anne is looking for is next to the trees.

  • Now we have some new words to describe where something is.

  • Brenton, I'm going to put another card down here.

  • It's a Two.

  • Now where is the Two?

  • The Two is on the left.

  • Is there another way we can describe where it is?

  • It's next to the Queen.

  • And where is the Queen?

  • The Queen is between the Two and the Ace.

  • That's right. It's between them.

  • There's a card on one side...

  • ... and another one on the other side of the Queen.

  • Now there's one more word we heard they had said where something is.

  • But I need to put up some more cards.

  • Now Brenton, how would you describe where the Queen is now?

  • Well, it's between the Ace and the Two.

  • Uhuh.

  • That's also opposite the Four.

  • Goodbye till next time.

  • See you later.

Hello.

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A2 AU queen town hall excuse street asks post office

Living English - Episode 04 - Second on the left

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    baymax posted on 2016/01/18
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