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  • and so you'd say, let's say doing the

  • upward facing dog

  • so okay, we're on the upward facing dog, now what?

  • nothing, here we are upward facing dog

  • this is

  • curriculum already being, just be here

  • how do you stay here? well, the arms are involved

  • so we can be aware that

  • we got a breath, we can be re-

  • spin, we're learning how to inhabit being

  • in elementary school and

  • all of a sudden, it wakes something up, finish that, you do something else, do

  • sequence of yoga, and then

  • you know, you can ask either, why you're doing it or afterward

  • when you say lying in, what's called the corpse pose, I don't necessaly have to

  • use that word, but

  • I love it, how do you feel?

  • and people usually feel like, more

  • I feel fantastic, what did you do?

  • nothing, really you did a little of this, and a little this

  • this, this, the lesson is

  • drop right in, so then you realize, well, there's more to this apparatus that

  • I call me then

  • meets the eye, and if imagine if I would actually nurture it

  • in these kinds of ways, if I would actually use these muscles

  • to cultivate awareness, to cultivate embodied

  • attending, to cultivate emotional intelligence

  • to cultivate, another word that was used quite a bit

  • self-regulation, so self recognition, so you recognize say

  • impulses of a anger when they arise, and you don't say

  • necessaly say I'm angry, just say, oh it's angering

  • it's like the, it's like raining

  • it's like we don't have to make it into personal thing, so then

  • it's like the anger, let's watch the anger that because the most

  • interesting object to the tension

  • says in being, just watch the anger come and go

  • and guess what? it comes and goes, if you're willing to be patient

  • as like Louis Pasteur looking at crystals under a microscope, he's like

  • complete discovery, anger, I don't have to buy into it

  • and then shoot somebody,

  • hate myself, you know what I'm talking about

  • it's like choice, but in order to be able to make the choice

  • you have to be brought to a point where you're

  • in the laboratory, you're engaged, this is all about practices in our philosophy

  • not like some Asian Buddhist, you know, Dharma philosophy, this is like

  • this is a practice and we don't have that much in our society, we don't just

  • don't have that kind of

  • deep cultural sense of

  • practice

  • when we think a practice, we think of rehearsing for a performance

  • we're talking about it, no, there's no separation between practice and

  • performance, this is it

  • OK, so what practice means exactly embodying

  • awareness now, and it turns out, this is

  • not a little thumbnail, that, you know, the breath gets mentioned that little, yes, let's

  • just teach them the breath

  • well, let's teach'em the yoga pose or this or that

  • but the fact of the matter is

  • it's not about the objects of attention, like we can pay attention to the breath

  • we can pay attention to our thoughts

  • we can pay attention to our emotions

  • but it's about the attending itself, be attending

  • itself, now it turns out

  • that when you study people who

  • have taken MBSR, for example, there's a very

  • beautiful study by young guy named Norman Farb works with

  • Zindel Segal at the University Toronto

  • took people trained in MBSR, not trained in MBSR, put them

  • in fMRI scanner, show them various additives

  • you know that they might or might not, self-identify with as their

  • and wrote an amazing paper

  • called

  • about self-referential mode

  • of knowing, OK

  • and what they found was that, when you put someone in fMRI scanner

  • and we said, just like you do nothing, it turns out

  • we don't just do nothing, we don't just kind of flat line

  • no silly Bob

  • we start thinking, we start in on

  • narrating the story of me

  • I could be as simple as like it's kinda squeezed in this tube

  • you know, to daydreaming, to fantasizing, to this and that, the problem

  • solving to

  • like the mind disguised gallops of, you know, and it's always

  • got some of it in mind

  • and that's, when you look at the brains, it turns out that

  • what lights up is a region in the midline

  • of the cerebral cortex, that is called the

  • sort of a narrative network, okay

  • it's like or it's often called the default mode, it's like

  • when you're not doing anything, that's what lights up, in just uses up enormous

  • amounts of energy

  • enormous amounts of many energy, lying there doing nothing

  • only you're not doing nothing, you get

  • you're thinking, thinking, thinking, thinking

  • thinking, same kinda thinking that doesn't let you go to sleep

  • and it's always the same old song, same

  • same picture playing on the marquee, the story of me

  • in the key of me, or the key of E

  • or the key of C, but it's always me

  • and my relationship to this, and my relationship to that, it's like surfing

  • surfing, surfing, surfing

  • okay, when you take people who are trained in MBSR

  • and compare them with the control group that was not trained MBSR

  • you put them in before, you put them in after in the scanner, so the

  • very interesting thing happens, in the MBSR group, that medial

  • default network, tends to attenuate

  • and another network comes on which is a kind the lateral network

  • that involves the insulin various other specialized regions of the

  • cerebral cortex, and it is seems to be about

  • when you ask people, and they'd get this through the additives that they have

  • subscribed to

  • like a no story, just this

  • sensory unfolding of breath

  • body, now

  • just being here, and it's okay, just the way we did at the beginning

  • you know, just here, well, how long is this gonna go on?

  • no, this is going to be now, just for now

  • for now

  • next three thousand minutes of now

  • so you got this other network which is basically called

  • the experiential network, it's just experiencing

  • life unfolding in the moment

  • so this is now neuroscience saying, OK, when we integrate

  • who we are, we've got the narrative going all the time, and that's partly true, but

  • a lot of time

  • let's be honest, I mean, a narratives

  • are not exactly 100 percent accurate

  • and then we've got the experiential piece that almost never gets any airtime

  • unless you've been trained

  • in this muscle of mindfulness, and then

  • this some kinda integration possible it's not that there's anything wrong

  • with the narrative

  • but fact is most narratives are too small, and

  • really too boring, and really much too repetitive

  • and much too negative

  • never mind prosocial behavior, we're antisocial to ourselves

  • so if that's the diagnosis and the Buddha diagnose that is

  • dukkha, suffering, ignorance

  • dis-ease and unsatisfactory in this because you know that

  • if you got something it's not going to last, and if you have something you don't

  • want its gonna last forever, so you're

  • your cooked, your goose is cooked either way, and this is all delusional thinking

  • it's like more that mid-line narrative

  • and the narratives like a lot of time is wrong, and then you get that depressive

  • rumination narratives

  • and pretty soon, you're down in the pits, and you can blame everybody including your

  • history, including trauma but the fact that matters

  • you're not bringing online all these other capacities

  • that are lying sitting inside your skull

  • that could be brought online, how?

  • repetition, not mindless but mindful repetition

  • breath comes in, breath goes out

  • just to choose an object to attend to comes in, goes out

  • comes in, goes out

  • how long is it gonna take before it? especially teenagers says

  • and we said on mano slide is boring

  • this is boring

  • so then the mind will go off and they will fantasize about something less

  • boring

  • all meditators know that, that's what the mind does

  • but you see, Boredoms just another mind state. just like anger

  • frustration, sadness

  • this is not a mind state, when you hold in an awareness, ain't it boring

  • boredom is not boring, very interesting

  • and it could be demonstrated very easily, a yogic maneuver many

  • of you know this one

  • you know, there's something called nadi sodhana and

  • pranayama, where you can do alternate nostril breathing and you use your

  • finger with both

  • so anyway you can all do this if you find the breath boring right now

  • for instance, you can do this yogic, sort of exercise where you take

  • one thumb and you push it over one nostril, you put the

  • index finger on the bridge of your nose, you squeeze the other finger

  • against the other nostril

  • purse their lips together, and you see just how long it takes for the

  • next in breath will becoming

  • only thing in the world is interesting to you, and it will not be very long

  • it will not be very long, so boring the breath

  • until you can't take one

  • so boring to have feet tend to walk, until you can't

  • so boring to have liver that just works, and never asked for anything

  • yeah until you, you know, drink so much alcohol that it goes offline

  • for good, so boring to have a body that works

  • back that doesn't cause pain, so boring

  • until you have a little smidge of pain in your lower back and you realize, holy

  • cow, for whole life

  • hinges on, fourth lumber vertebrae, and how the interface with the pelvis

  • we take everything for granted

  • until we wake up, rude awakening, usually its no fun

  • what if we were actually trained in

  • in this whole developmental arc which is as becoming ourselves

  • the formation of a human being

  • in school, in early childhood, so we're actually

  • find out what the whole of this thing does, yeah, thinking is great

  • but what about awareness thing

  • what about, what if they got equal their time and training

  • and then we could actually, hold our motions

  • so far the ways would be transformative

  • Verbatim :Onishi Keisuke 英文聽打:大西啟介

and so you'd say, let's say doing the

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B1 UK breath anger thinking thinking trained thinking surfing

18- Befriending Your Mind, Befriending Your Life- Jon Kabat Zinn

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    rsheng65 posted on 2016/01/04
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