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  • Good afternoon.

  • Thought I'd try to be like Zuck,

  • but I'm not as fluent in Mandarin as Zuckerberg is.

  • Thank you everyone.

  • I'd like to talk with you a little bit about

  • what we call "The 100-Year Plan".

  • If you think about a time-honored tradition,

  • usually when you have individuals

  • that you care about, that you love,

  • you usually move on with something to them.

  • Whether it be a watch,

  • whether it be a piece of furniture or what not.

  • That's what I really want to talk about

  • with everyone this afternoon.

  • Let's go back in time.

  • Let's go back to sometime in the early '70s.

  • Consumer electronics companies actually had a vision

  • of longevity of product design.

  • Unfortunately, it hasn't played out necessarily

  • the way they had envisioned in their advertising.

  • This could be the tape deck

  • you would leave with your grandson.

  • Really?

  • I don't think this is really a Rolex.

  • A Rolex does stand the test of time.

  • But, we believe,

  • my co-founders and I,

  • Aubrey Anderson, Jason Proctor,

  • those of us in Monohm,

  • that there is a chance for a 100 year plan,

  • and there's also an opportunity to share this vision

  • to other new start-ups,

  • other consumer electronics,

  • other product design companies around the world.

  • Especially as it relates to this new medium

  • of Internet of Things and wearables.

  • Over the course of my two decades

  • of working in this industry,

  • I'd have to say that a lot of the experiences

  • and products that I've worked on

  • have unfortunately ended up

  • at the top of the e-waste pile.

  • Usually the life span of one of our particular products

  • that we would make

  • usually lasts only about two years.

  • So when we formed this new company, Monohm,

  • we thought really hard.

  • We did a lot of internal soul-searching.

  • And this is interesting, because coming from America,

  • we don't really think past maybe 30, 40, or 50 years.

  • We're trying to think 100 years out,

  • something that is generational.

  • We said, "If we were going to make an object

  • that would be part of our lives,

  • how can we make it sustain 100 years,

  • or even longer?"

  • So we sought out experts, individuals,

  • that are also like-minded within this thinking.

  • We break this down into three phases.

  • I'm going to take you through each of the three phases.

  • The first is sustainable.

  • As one of the earlier speakers this afternoon said,

  • "It's not a matter of doing green architecture or green design,

  • every design,

  • every environmental experience should be green."

  • And I believe that as well.

  • I also think that when you create the experience

  • of the product that you're going to be

  • essentially sharing with your world,

  • those that you care about

  • those that will inherit this particular experience,

  • you need to think about what's going to go into it.

  • One of the things that we've been looking into is that

  • we do have a trash problem.

  • How can you make something

  • that can stand the test of time

  • and also try to fix that unique issue

  • and not contribute back to the problem?

  • There's a huge cesspool of PET bottles and trash

  • coming from our region, the Pacific Ocean region,

  • in the North Pacific.

  • We were looking at and studying

  • how can we build something

  • that's beautiful and architectural,

  • something that is really akin

  • that would last 100 years.

  • We're looking to new material sciences

  • and how companies like Envision Plastics

  • can reclaim these objects that were once created

  • and then disregarded into our ecosystem.

  • What can we actually make with that?

  • So we got together with a few of our

  • also close-minded, like-minded friends,

  • one of which is SurfaceInk.

  • They are also applying this philosophy

  • into the future products that they're making today.

  • This is one example.

  • It's a toy that's intended to really stand the test of time

  • in the wear and tear of young individuals.

  • But it's also sustainable.

  • It's created from collecting the waste,

  • putting it into an experience that the children will enjoy.

  • Yet it can gracefully degrade

  • and go back into the ecosystem.

  • The toy was designed so that it can be taken apart,

  • and also be disassembled and put back

  • and recycled into something else.

  • This is the like-minded thinking that we are inspired by

  • and that we are building our new company around.

  • Heirloom is another key pinnacle of

  • what we see as part of the 100 year plan.

  • If you think about heirloom as I mentioned earlier

  • as an example with the Sony tape deck,

  • (my dad actually had one of those...

  • I probably still have it in the garage...

  • maybe with Saturday Night Fever soundtrack),

  • you want to be able to give something.

  • Even if it's a piece of electronics

  • that you might be able to still display it

  • on your mantle, put it on your desk,

  • and it still becomes a part of your life

  • that you're passing down to a generation.

  • When you think about heirlooms,

  • it's not necessarily something that would

  • come out of the United States.

  • But there are also another set of like-minded individuals

  • that we're working very closely with

  • around this particular challenge,

  • Box Clever being one of them.

  • A good example of something that can be passed down

  • is essentially furniture.

  • If you think about the one object

  • that stands the test of time,

  • it's something that we use everyday,

  • it's functional,

  • it can be inherited down generationally,

  • that is definitely furniture.

  • They set out for the most recent Poise project

  • to create a set of extensible,

  • very enriching objects that generationally

  • will hold up and patina over the time

  • that will just gracefully integrate within one's lives.

  • The best object that anyone can design

  • is something that's really invisible

  • and that you really depend on

  • and it just integrates within your own life.

  • I think that they really have accomplished this.

  • And this is a really good example

  • that inspires us to be

  • and deliver that heirloom quality.

  • Another example, and this is something

  • that probably will resonate with

  • all of you here in Taipei.

  • A good friend of mine, Alexander Bazes,

  • changed careers.

  • We were just talking about entrepreneurship and

  • re-inventing yourself a little bit earlier.

  • What Alex did, was...

  • he was a PhD philosophy student

  • at the University of Kyoto

  • who essentially decided,

  • "I'm going to make swords.

  • I'm going to make knives in the traditional,

  • samurai blacksmithing technique."

  • And he went back, and he found a mountain,

  • and he started working on his craft.

  • And he's applying that heritage mentality

  • of creating some really exquisite...

  • (This is a picture of him in his outdoor setting)

  • knives that really...

  • If you think about using the material,

  • building something that can stand and wear

  • with the test of time,

  • that is something that I believe we should all

  • fall back to with our product design

  • in the near future.

  • Something to note about these types of technologies

  • whether it's metal, whether it's ceramics,

  • whether it's reclaimed sustainable materials,

  • now you'll be able to bring life and intelligence into them.

  • You'll be able to add brains, essentially,

  • creating an nascent object into a smart object.

  • And that is what really will surround us

  • within our connected homes.

  • And heritage.

  • Heritage is something that within the 100 year plan

  • I think in order for you to sustain that longevity

  • of the product experiences that you're trying to create

  • that can be passed down generationally

  • as an heirloom object,

  • you wanna instill a sense of heritage.

  • And that's something a lot of us can learn from

  • a lot of the Swiss companies,

  • the European couture brands.

  • We're working very closely with a group of artisans,

  • handcraft artisans in Kyoto,

  • studying, discussing, engaging with them

  • around their craft and how their craft can be utilized

  • in some of our thinking and some of the future ideas

  • that we're going to be bringing to market.

  • We call this collaboration "Kyoto California",

  • or "Kyo-Cali".

  • Essentially, the thinking behind this --

  • and this could be Taipei and California,

  • this could be London and Beijing.

  • The thinking about this is to take

  • something that's of heritage,

  • a craftsman experience,

  • and melding it with the modern.

  • Melding it with the technology

  • and the infrastructure and the entrepreneurship

  • of a particular area.

  • And in this case, it's Silicon Valley.

  • Because of the fusion of the two disciplines

  • and experiences in knowledge colliding together,

  • it will generate new ideas

  • that never would have been envisioned.

  • And that's part of the 100-year plan.

  • Kaikado. Takahiro Yagi,

  • who is an amazing craftsman,

  • and inside of his family business,

  • who, generationally, dating all the way back

  • to the early days when Kyoto was the capital,

  • has been making some amazing canisters

  • that have also started in a really refined, executed

  • use of storing tea.

  • But through the use of bringing back heirloom metals,

  • how the metals were made hundreds of years ago,

  • bringing that mentality back

  • into delivering these next-generation products,

  • he's expanded so that now they meet the needs of

  • chefs around the world for pasta or for coffee.

  • One of the incredible things about

  • the particular products that he makes...

  • (and I brought one with me just to show everyone)

  • This is a brand-new tea canister.

  • Yet it has the finish of a 100-year object.

  • That's also the thought and thinking that went into this.

  • Of the patina, how do you advance the patina?

  • So it might be initially really shiny like these,

  • but you can advance the aging and wearing of it.

  • The other thing that's really impressive

  • about this thinking of the 100-year plan

  • is that this has incredible warrantee.

  • You can bring it back 60 years from now

  • and they'll fix it.

  • And that really comes down to the precision

  • of hundreds of a millimeter that they have

  • of hand making.

  • The closure mechanism.

  • It's closing itself just by dropping it

  • upon the top and flushing all the air out.

  • That is incredible craftsmanship.