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  • Wherever you're watching CNN Student News,

  • thank you for taking ten minutes for our daily update of current events.

  • I'm Carl Azuz . First up, at 4: 20 AM yesterday,

  • heavily armed French police moved in on an apartment building

  • in a a suburb of northern Paris.

  • They were looking for a relative of this man, Abdelhamid Abaaoud.

  • He's a Frenchman who is believed to be the ringleader

  • of last week's terrorist attacks in Paris that left 129 people dead.

  • A wiretap reportedly helped French investigators

  • overhear a phone conversation.

  • It indicated that Abaaoud's cousin was at the apartment.

  • As police closed in, gunfire erupted.

  • A female suicide bomber detonated her explosives and a floor collapsed.

  • We've managed to get on to a rooftop here from which

  • we can see the building behind me.

  • I'm just gonna duck out so that we can just push in

  • and take a look at that apartment building that was the focus of these raids.

  • We can see forensic experts have been moving around inside those rooms.

  • They've been taking photographs. And you can see

  • the aftermath of those blasts that were heard.

  • All the windows have been blown out.

  • You can see the pockmarks of heavy weaponry around those windows.

  • This was one of hundreds of police operations in recent days.

  • Two people were killed in the raid.

  • Investigators are using DNA tests to figure out who the suspects were.

  • Eight others were arrested.

  • A French official said judging by the weapons and the organization

  • of the people in the apartment, they were prepared to act,

  • possibly in another terrorist attack.

  • French president Francois Hollande said the raid was proof

  • that his country is at war with the ISIS terrorist group,

  • which claim responsibility for the Paris attacks.

  • The French government has proposed extending the country's state

  • of emergency for three more months.

  • That would limit certain rights of residence,

  • and it would allow law enforcement to have more power

  • to conduct searches and hold people in police custody.

  • Investigators have found cellphones they believe the terrorist carried.

  • The attackers were apparently exploiting encryption technology

  • to keep their plot secret.

  • One key to preventing future attacks is

  • understanding how terrorists communicate.

  • They planned a coordinated, complex attack,

  • and there's new information on tight, operational security

  • and communication among these terrorists.

  • Investigators have found evidence that the operatives

  • tied to the Paris attackers frequently changed cell phones,

  • switched cars, even searched for possible listening devices.

  • And according to counterterrorism and intelligence officials

  • there's evidence that they used encryption.

  • Maybe they're using encrypted messaging apps.

  • They do a very good job of hiding whatever you're saying

  • from being intercepted by somebody like a government.

  • Encryption, conversations chopped up into a jumble by mathematical algorithms,

  • code that US officials say is nearly impossible to crack.

  • We don't have the ability to break strong encryption.

  • And so, if they move to the mobile messaging app, we're gonna lose them.

  • So that's a huge worry. Apps like one called Signal, encrypt phone calls.

  • WhatsApp and an app called Telegram, encrypt text.

  • Telegram also has an avenues similar to Facebook and Twitter

  • where you can post public messages.

  • ISIS used Telegram to claim responsibility for the Paris attacks

  • and the downing of the Russian passenger plane in Sinai.

  • ISIS, analysts say, is constantly coaching its operatives

  • on how to use secure communications.

  • In its English language publications ISIS says use an Android phone.

  • They're the hardest to crack for the intelligence agencies.

  • Use particular applications that are anonymized.

  • Use Tor, which is, of course, the dark net.

  • But with all its tech savvy, ISIS may have made one significant cyber enemy.

  • Anonymous, the notorious group of activist hackers,

  • is now threatening to unleash a wave of cyber attacks against ISIS

  • in retaliation for the Paris assaults. Matthew Green says the people at Anonymous

  • are probably better hackers than the ones ISIS has.

  • But he doesn't think they'll be able to do much damage to ISIS and he says

  • they certainly can't break the encryptions. They're simply too well designed.

  • Brian Tots, CNN, Baltimore.

  • Checking in now with three of the thousands of schools viewing worldwide today.

  • Gyeonggi- do is a province in South Korea and it's where we found

  • Gyeonggi Suwon International School.

  • Thank you for watching from the northwestern part of South Korea.

  • In the city of Cottonwood, Arizona, hello to the Lobos.

  • Good to see you at Cottonwood Middle School.

  • And from Lewistown Montana please welcome Lewistown Junior High School,

  • home of the golden eagles. On Tuesday night,

  • governor Bobby Jindal announced he was suspending his campaign for president.

  • Jindal's the current leader of Louisiana and a Rhodes scholar.

  • He'd been seeking the nomination for the Republican party,

  • but like the other Republicans and Democrats who dropped out of the race,

  • Governor Jindal had trouble getting traction in the polls,

  • and raising the needed campaign funds.

  • His announcement leaves 14 people seeking the Republican party's nomination for president.

  • On the Democratic side there are three candidates.

  • Each major party will nominate just one for next years U. S. presidential race.

  • To all of you in this room and who are watching please

  • please remember that we have the power to create the world

  • that we want to live in, just as we want it.

  • And that's what all the heroes here have done tonight.

  • Thank you so much, this is so great.

  • You might have recognized her. It was Maggie Doyne,

  • CNN's 2015 hero of the year, chosen by CNN's audience in an online vote.

  • Maggie Doyne was part of our character study series.

  • CNN heroes fit into that well because they're

  • everyday folks who find ways to make extraordinary differences in the lives of others.

  • Maggie Doyne's babysitting money

  • is what contributed to the program she started in the southern Asian country of Nepal.

  • Most 28 year old girls my age have a very different reality,

  • a lot of engagements, and you know, first babies.

  • I mean, I took a very different path.

  • After high school I decided to travel around the world with my backpack.

  • In Nepal, for the first time, I really saw

  • the effects of civil war, and children and women suffering, and it changed me.

  • There was one little girl, she was standing in a heap of garbage and she said,

  • namaste didi, that means hello sister.

  • That was the beginning [ FOREIGN ] I called up my parents

  • and I asked them to wire me over my $ 5, 000 of babysitting money.

  • It's time to get up. Good morning. Good morning.

  • We started with the home, and then we built a school.

  • Blue color. Blue color. We select children who, without us,

  • would not be able to go to school.

  • A lot of them are begging on the streets. You got it.

  • We have created one of the top performing schools in the entire region,

  • for 350 children, and 50 of those kids live in our home.

  • Our first priority is to keep a child with their family.

  • And then in the severe case of a child who really has nobody,

  • they come in to live in our home.

  • When you walk in the front gate of Kopila Valley you don't see suffering.

  • You see healthy, laughing, thriving kids.

  • Welcome to Kopila Valley.

  • And lastly today, how do you know when a group of penguin tries

  • to escape from their habitat? Well, let's look at this for some clues.

  • Wet penguin prints, check.

  • Wet penguin prints leading down a nearby hallway, check!

  • A group of small, flightless birds caught wandering around the corner, check.

  • They weren't successful at leaving their exhibit at a Denmark zoo.

  • They reached a dead end. So, the five not- so- elusive animals

  • turned around and, headed back. Well, it's not like they could fly the coop.

  • And though their change of a heart there could be called a flip- flop,

  • zookeepers gotta be wondering, waddle they do next.

  • They managed to hatch this plan even if, like fish out of water,

  • they were caught when things were just were just penginning.

  • I'm Carl Azuz and that's your Thursday edition of CNN student news.

Wherever you're watching CNN Student News,

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