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  • Welcome viewers worldwide to CNN Student News. I'm Carl Azuz.

  • We're starting in the nation of Turkey where the leaders

  • 20 countries have gathered for the annual G20 Summit.

  • Usually, it focuses on global economic growth,

  • but the recent terrorist attacks in Paris, France

  • are dominating discussions at the G20.

  • US President, Barrack Obama, held a press conference yesterday.

  • He spent a good part of it defending US strategy for fighting ISIS,

  • as criticism increases that America isn't doing enough

  • to defeat the terrorist group.

  • There have been a few who suggested that we should put

  • large numbers of US troops on the ground.

  • It is not just my view, but the view of my closest military

  • and civilian advisers that that would be a mistake.

  • The president plans to keep the current US strategy in place,

  • which partly involves air strikes on ISIS targets

  • and helping local groups fight ISIS.

  • The Obama administration also says it's sticking with plans

  • to accept 10, 000 Syrian refugees in the US next year.

  • Yesterday, at least 19 US states announced they were

  • against allowing Syrian refugees to resettle there.

  • 18 of them are led by Republican governors.

  • One is by a democrat.

  • And at least five states said they'd accept refugees.

  • All of them led by Democratic governors.

  • Part of the reason for the controversy is that French authorities reported

  • at least one of the terrorist attackers had entered France

  • with the flood of refugees from Syria,

  • and six of the terrorists had reportedly spent time in Syria.

  • The US State Department says it has a process that

  • allows for the safer settlement of Syrian refugees.

  • The director of the Central Intelligence Agency says

  • the Paris attacks probably weren't a one- off event.

  • So, security's being increased across Europe.

  • French President Francois Hollande announced 5, 000 positions

  • would be added to his country's paramilitary police force.

  • Seven attackers were killed in the Paris assault,

  • but the Islamic terrorist group ISIS,

  • which claimed responsibility says eight attackers were involved.

  • So, the search for suspects continues.

  • The US and France say they are increasing the ways they share intelligence.

  • When we're talking about terror investigations across 50 states,

  • hundreds or thousands of investigations simultaneously,

  • you can't go into a single investigation as a one- off every time.

  • It's not a new process every time you open a case.

  • There are simple ways to consider how to break down a case.

  • So, let's go through six or eight of them. You wanna talk about money,

  • where the money for the group is coming from.

  • You wanna talk about travel, whether the individuals in the group

  • have gone someplace to receive training.

  • You wanna know who the conspirators are.

  • You wanna know who's at the core of this spiderweb of conspiracy.

  • You wanna know what we call facilitators. Who, for example,

  • provided documentation? Who provided assistance to travel overseas?

  • You want to know about documents, passports, drivers license.

  • You wanna know the critical question, do they have access to weapons and explosives?

  • When you're looking at a case like this,

  • you have to understand these initially to break down the case

  • to determine its complexity.

  • Among all these, there are two or three that I would focus on

  • to ensure that you own the case.

  • The first and most significant,

  • do I have one spider in the spiderweb or ten?

  • Second thing you want to focus on,

  • do these guys have the capability to do something tonight

  • in America that threatens a woman or child or a family?

  • Last and most interesting, travel.

  • In my experience, as soon as you see travel to a place like Yemen,

  • Somalia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Syria, and Iraq.

  • They think in a fundamentally more sophisticated way than

  • somebody who has not had access to overseas training.

  • So, you walk in the room in the morning,

  • 7 o'clock tomorrow morning. Don't say, hey, we've got another terror threat in New York,

  • or Chicago, or Los Angeles. Say, hey, we've got another case.

  • There is a way to break down this case so not everyone is new,

  • and there are some things we wanna prioritize to ensure that every time,

  • we can take it down clean and neat. Thank you.

  • The American Academy of Pediatrics says the use of antibiotics

  • in farm animals is threatening the children who eat meat.

  • How? Well, antibiotics are used to kill infections.

  • But there's been an increase in peoples' resistance to certain antibiotics.

  • Meaning the drugs aren't as effective as they used to be.

  • Health officials say part of the reason for this is that doctors

  • sometimes prescribe antibiotics when they're not necessary.

  • The pediatrics organization, which focuses on children's health,

  • says another reason for resistance is because antibiotics are overused

  • in farm animals. So, they're encouraging parents to buy meat that has been raised without antibiotics.

  • Why do some farmers use them? For one thing,

  • they help keep the animals healthy. And they help them gain weight,

  • which makes the animals more profitable for farmers.

  • Western France is where we begin today's Roll Call.

  • A warm welcome to our viewers in [ FOREIGN ].

  • We're glad to be part of your day at University Institute of Technology.

  • The western US is up next. In the city of Bend, Oregon,

  • don't tread on the Diamondbacks of High Desert Middle School.

  • And finally, to West Virginia, the Applemen are here.

  • Hello to everyone at Musselman High School in the community of Inwood.

  • We recently reported on companies that were looking to use low- orbit satellites

  • to bring internet access to people who don't have it.

  • One of the downsides we mentioned, space junk.

  • NASA estimates there are around 500, 000 pieces of space junk

  • floating around above us. Could be spacecrafts that don't work,

  • parts of rockets we've launched, garbage or debris from previous missions.

  • Scientists are concerned about this junk potentially threatening future missions

  • or hitting something if it falls back to Earth.

  • There's some speculation that it could be,

  • maybe a spent third stage from one of the Apollo moon missions

  • that's been going around in system lunar space for this many decades,

  • because it's in a highly elliptical orbit. And so,

  • that's kinda what causes it to come in so sharply.

  • Staying in the sky. The uses for drones, unmanned aircraft, continue to expand.

  • We've talked about them in the military, in search and rescue,

  • in getting video of hard to reach disaster areas.

  • How about their potential in sports? You might not need a pilot's license for this.

  • It really feels like nothing you can describe.

  • It feels like you're flying. The trick, really, is in the camera and the transmission.

  • The transmission of the video signal to the pilot while he's flying,

  • he's watching it through these goggles.

  • It's so immersive that your brain really thinks you're in the air frame.

  • Many pilots cannot fly standing up.

  • They have to sit down, because you literally would sway your body

  • to follow the motions of your air frame.

  • Drone racing, then, is basically you getting together with a bunch of friends,

  • and race these air frames together, chasing each other through very tricky courses,

  • and determining whose the best pilot and gets there first.

  • Drone racing has been just a hobby.

  • I think now the challenges starts where, we're really thinking that there's a sport

  • in drone racing. At the Drone Nationals, we had thousands of people

  • view the race online, and it showed us that there's huge demand

  • for the pilots that are still dispersed around the world

  • to join in and watch an event. I think, that in five years,

  • we will have a very vibrant and well- established drone racing sport,

  • and all the infrastructure to support it, as well.

  • Using puns, we can drone on about the plans drone up

  • and the skill drone upon to droniminate such a sport.

  • Could get pretty drone- out. But one thing that's undroneable,

  • it's certainly a sport for control freaks.

  • Teachers, we've corrected a technical issue.

  • You can now send us an email once again from the feedback tab

  • at CNNStudentNews. com. We don't accept Roll Call requests from that link,

  • but anything else that's on your mind, we'd love to hear about.

  • Have a great Tuesday.

Welcome viewers worldwide to CNN Student News. I'm Carl Azuz.

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