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  • I had requested slides,

  • kind of adamantly,

  • up till the -- pretty much, last few days,

  • but was denied access to a slide projector.

  • (Laughter)

  • I actually find them a lot more emotional --

  • (Laughter)

  • -- and personal,

  • and the neat thing about a slide projector

  • is you can actually focus the work,

  • unlike PowerPoint and some other programs.

  • Now, I agree that

  • you have to -- yeah, there are certain concessions

  • and, you know, if you use a slide projector,

  • you're not able to have the bad type

  • swing in from the back or the side, or up or down,

  • but maybe that's an O.K. trade-off,

  • to trade that off for a focus.

  • (Laughter)

  • It's a thought. Just a thought.

  • And there's something nice about slides getting stuck.

  • And the thing you really hope for

  • is occasionally they burn up,

  • which we won't see tonight. So.

  • With that, let's get the first slide up here.

  • This, as many of you have probably guessed,

  • is a

  • recently emptied beer can in Portugal.

  • (Laughter)

  • This -- I had just arrived in Barcelona for the first time,

  • and I thought --

  • you know, fly all night, I looked up,

  • and I thought, wow, how clean.

  • You come into this major airport, and they simply have a B.

  • I mean, how nice is that?

  • Everything's gotten simpler in design,

  • and here's this mega airport,

  • and God, I just -- I took a picture.

  • I thought, God, that is the coolest thing I've ever seen at an airport.

  • Till a couple months later,

  • I went back to the same airport --

  • same plane, I think -- and looked up,

  • and it said C.

  • (Laughter)

  • It was only then that I realized

  • it was simply a gate that I was coming into.

  • (Laughter)

  • I'm a big believer in the emotion of design,

  • and the message that's sent

  • before somebody begins to read,

  • before they get the rest of the information;

  • what is the emotional response they get to the product,

  • to the story, to the painting -- whatever it is.

  • That area of design interests me the most,

  • and I think this for me is a real clear,

  • very simplified version

  • of what I'm talking about.

  • These are a couple of garage doors painted identical,

  • situated next to each other.

  • So, here's the first door. You know, you get the message.

  • You know, it's pretty clear.

  • Take a look at the second door and see

  • if there's any different message.

  • O.K., which one would you park in front of?

  • (Laughter)

  • Same color, same message, same words.

  • The only thing that's different

  • is the expression that the individual door-owner here put into the piece --

  • and, again,

  • which is the psycho-killer here?

  • (Laughter)

  • Yet it doesn't say that; it doesn't need to say that.

  • I would probably park in front of the other one.

  • I'm sure a lot of you are aware

  • that graphic design has gotten a lot simpler in the last

  • five years or so.

  • It's gotten so simple that it's already starting to kind of

  • come back the other way again and get a little more expressive.

  • But I was in Milan and saw this street sign,

  • and was very happy to

  • see that apparently this idea of minimalism

  • has even been translated by the graffiti artist.

  • (Laughter)

  • And this graffiti artist has come along,

  • made this sign a little bit better, and then moved on.

  • (Laughter)

  • He didn't overpower it like they have a tendency to do.

  • (Laughter)

  • This is for a book by "Metropolis."

  • I took some photos, and this is

  • a billboard in Florida,

  • and either they hadn't paid their rent,

  • or they didn't want to pay their rent again on the sign,

  • and the billboard people were too cheap to tear the whole sign down,

  • so they just teared out sections of it.

  • And I would argue that it's possibly more effective

  • than the original billboard in terms of getting your attention,

  • getting you to look over that way.

  • And hopefully you don't stop and buy those awful pecan things -- Stuckey's.

  • This is from my second book.

  • The first book is called, "The End of Print,"

  • and it was done along with a film,

  • working with William Burroughs.

  • And "The End of Print" is now in its fifth printing.

  • (Laughter)

  • When I first contacted William Burroughs about being part of it,

  • he said no; he said he didn't believe it was the end of print.

  • And I said, well, that's fine;

  • I just would love to have your input on this film and this book,

  • and he finally agreed to it.

  • And at the end of the film, he says in this great voice

  • that I can't mimic but I'll kind of try, but not really, he says,

  • "I remember attending an exhibition called,

  • 'Photography: The End of Painting.'"

  • And then he says, "And, of course, it wasn't at all."

  • So, apparently when photography was perfected,

  • there were people going around saying,

  • that's it: you've just ruined painting.

  • People are just going to take pictures now.

  • And of course, that wasn't the case.

  • So, this is from "2nd Sight,"

  • a book I did on intuition.

  • I think it's not the only ingredient in design,

  • but possibly the most important.

  • It's something everybody has.

  • It's not a matter of teaching it;

  • in fact, most of the schools tend to discount intuition

  • as an ingredient of your working process

  • because they can't quantify it:

  • it's very hard to teach people the four steps to intuitive design,

  • but we can teach you the four steps to a nice business card

  • or a newsletter.

  • So it tends to get discounted.

  • This is a quote from Albert Einstein, who says,

  • "The intellect has little to do on the road to discovery.

  • There comes a leap in consciousness --

  • call it intuition or what you will --

  • and the solution just comes to you, and you don't know from where or why."

  • So, it's kind of like when somebody says, Who did that song?

  • And the more you try to think about it,

  • the further the answer gets from you,

  • and the minute you stop thinking about it,

  • your intuition gives you that answer, in a sense.

  • I like this for a couple of reasons.

  • If you've had any design courses, they would teach you you can't read this.

  • I think you eventually can and, more importantly, I think it's true.

  • "Don't mistake legibility for communication."

  • Just because something's legible doesn't means it communicates.

  • More importantly, it doesn't mean it communicates the right thing.

  • So, what is the message sent before

  • somebody actually gets into the material?

  • And I think that's sometimes an overlooked area.

  • This is working with Marshall McLuhan.

  • I stayed and worked with his wife and son, Eric,

  • and we came up with close to 600 quotes from Marshall

  • that are just amazing in terms of being ahead of the times,

  • predicting so much of what has happened

  • in the advertising, television, media world.

  • And so this book is called "Probes." It's another word for quotes.

  • And it's -- a lot of them are never -- have never been published before,

  • and basically, I've interpreted the different quotes.

  • So, this was the contents page originally.

  • When I got done it was 540 pages,

  • and then the publisher, Gingko Press,

  • ended up cutting it down considerably:

  • it's just under 400 pages now.

  • But I decided I liked this contents page --

  • I liked the way it looks -- so I kept it.

  • (Laughter)

  • It now has no relevance to the book whatsoever,

  • but it's a nice spread, I think, in there.

  • (Laughter)

  • So, a couple spreads from the book:

  • here McLuhan says,

  • "The new media are not bridges between Man and Nature; they are Nature."

  • "The invention of printing did away with anonymity,

  • fostering ideas of literary fame

  • and the habit of considering intellectual effort as private property,"

  • which had never been done before printing.

  • "When new technologies impose themselves

  • on societies long habituated to older technologies,

  • anxieties of all kinds result."

  • "While people are engaged in creating a totally different world,

  • they always form vivid images of the preceding world."

  • I hate this stuff. It's hard to read.

  • (Laughter)

  • (Applause)

  • "People in the electronic age have no possible environment except the globe,

  • and no possible occupation except information gathering."

  • That was it. That's all he saw as the options. And not too far off.

  • So, this is a project for Nine Inch Nails.

  • And I only show it because it seemed like it got all this relevancy all of a sudden,

  • and it was done right after 9/11.

  • And I had recently discovered a bomb shelter

  • in the backyard of a house I had bought in LA

  • that the real estate person hadn't pointed out.

  • (Laughter)

  • There was some bomb shelter built, apparently in the '60s Cuban missile crisis.

  • And I asked the real estate guy what it was as we were walking by,

  • and he goes, "It's something to do with the sewage system."

  • I was, O.K.; that's fine.

  • I finally went down there, and it was this old rusted circular thing,

  • and two beds, and very kind of creepy and weird.

  • And also, surprisingly, it was done in kind of a cheap metal,

  • and it had completely rusted through, and water everywhere, and spiders.

  • And I thought, you know, what were they thinking?

  • You'd think maybe cement, possibly, or something.

  • But anyway, I used this for a cover for the Nine Inch Nails DVD,

  • and I've also now fixed the bomb shelter with duct tape,

  • and it's ready. I think I'm ready. So.

  • This is an experiment, really, for a client, Quicksilver,

  • where we were taking what was a six-shot sequence

  • and trying to use print as a medium to get people to the Web.

  • So, this is a six-shot sequence.

  • I've taken one shot; I cropped it a few different ways.

  • And then the tiny line of copy says,

  • If you want to see this entire sequence --

  • how this whole ride was -- go to the website.

  • And my guess is that a lot of the surf kids did go to the site

  • to get this entire picture.

  • Got no way of tracking it, so I could be totally wrong.

  • (Laughter)

  • I don't have the site. It's just the piece itself.

  • This is a group in New York called the Coalition for a Smoke-free Environment --

  • asked me to do these posters.

  • They were wild-posted around New York City.

  • You can't really -- well, you can't see it at all --

  • but the second line is really the more kind of payoff, in a sense.

  • It says, "If the cigarette companies can lie, then so can we." But --

  • (Laughter)

  • (Applause)

  • -- but I did.

  • These were literally wild-posted all over New York one night,

  • and there were definitely some heads turning,

  • you know, people smoking and, "Huh!"

  • (Laughter)

  • And it was purposely done to look fairly serious.

  • It wasn't some, you know, weird grunge type or something;

  • it looked like they might be real. Anyway.

  • Poster for Atlantic Center for the Arts, a school in Florida.

  • This amazes me. This is a product I just found out.

  • I was in the Caribbean at Christmas,

  • and I'm just blown away that in this day and age they will still sell --

  • not that they will sell --

  • that there is felt a need for people to lighten the color of their skin.

  • This was either an old product with new packaging,

  • or a brand-new package, and I just thought,