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  • Jerry Maguire is a 1996 American romantic comedy-drama sports film starring Tom Cruise,

  • Cuba Gooding, Jr., and Renée Zellweger. It was written, co-produced, and directed by

  • Cameron Crowe. The film was inspired by sports agent Leigh Steinberg, who acted as Technical

  • Consultant on the crew. It was released in North American theaters on December 13, 1996,

  • distributed by Gracie Films and TriStar Pictures. The film received very positive reviews, praising

  • the performances of Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Renee Zellweger and the screenplay.

  • The film was a financial success, bringing in more than $270 million worldwide, against

  • its $50 million budget. It was the ninth top-grossing film of 1996.

  • The film was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor for

  • Tom Cruise, with Cuba Gooding, Jr. winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.

  • The film was also nominated for three Golden Globes, with Tom Cruise winning for Best Actor,

  • and three Screen Actors Guild Awards, with Cuba Gooding, Jr. winning Best Supporting

  • Actor.

  • Plot Jerry Maguire is a glossy 35-year-old sports

  • agent working for Sports Management International. He writes a mission statement about perceived

  • dishonesty in the sports management business which prompts Management to send Bob Sugar,

  • Jerry's protégé, to fire him. Jerry and Sugar call all of Jerry's clients to try convincing

  • them not to hire the services of the other. Sugar secures most of Jerry's previous clients.

  • Jerry speaks to Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Rod Tidwell, one of his clients who is disgruntled

  • with his contract. Rod tests Jerry's resolve through a very long telephone conversation

  • while Sugar is able to convince the rest of Jerry's clients to stick with SMI instead.

  • Leaving the office, Jerry announces that he will start his own agency and asks if anyone

  • is willing to join him, to which only 26-year-old single mother Dorothy Boyd agrees. Meanwhile,

  • Frank "Cush" Cushman, a superstar quarterback prospect expects to be the number one pick

  • in the NFL Draft, also stays with Jerry after he makes a visit to the Cushman home. However,

  • Sugar is able to convince Cushman at the last minute to sign with SMI.

  • After an argument, Jerry breaks up with his disgruntled fiancée. He then turns to Dorothy,

  • becoming closer to her young son, Ray, and eventually starts a relationship with her.

  • However, Dorothy contemplates moving to San Diego as she has a secure job offer there.

  • Jerry concentrates all his efforts on Rod, now his only client, who turns out to be very

  • difficult to satisfy. Over the next several months, the two direct harsh criticism towards

  • each other with Rod claiming that Jerry is not trying hard enough to get him a contract

  • while Jerry claims that Rod is not proving himself worthy of the money for which he asks.

  • Jerry marries Dorothy to help them both stay afloat financially and to keep her from moving

  • away. He is emotionally and physically distant during the marriage but is clearly invested

  • in becoming a father to Ray. Although Dorothy loves Jerry, she breaks up with him because

  • she believes that he does not love her. Before the start of a Monday Night Football

  • game between the Cardinals and the Dallas Cowboys, Rod plays well but appears to receive

  • a serious injury when catching a touchdown. He recovers, however, and dances for the wildly

  • cheering crowd. Afterwards, Jerry and Rod embrace in front of other athletes and sports

  • agents and show how their relationship has progressed from a strictly business one to

  • a close personal one, which was one of the points Jerry made in his mission statement.

  • Jerry then flies back home to meet Dorothy. He then speaks for several minutes, telling

  • her that he loves her and wants her in his life, which she accepts. Rod later appears

  • on Roy Firestone's sports show. Unbeknownst to him, Jerry has secured him an $11.2 million

  • contract with the Cardinals allowing him to finish his pro football career in Arizona.

  • The visibly emotional Rod proceeds to thank everyone and extends warm gratitude to Jerry.

  • Jerry speaks with several other pro athletes, some of whom have read his earlier mission

  • statement and respect his work with Rod. The movie ends with Ray throwing a baseball

  • up in the air surprising Jerry. Jerry then discusses Dorothy about Ray's future possible

  • career in the sports industry. Cast

  • Janet Jackson auditioned and was initially accepted for the role of Marcee Tidwell, though

  • it later went to Regina King, who previously co-starred in Jackson's debut film Poetic

  • Justice. Jackson is referenced twice in the film, with a Janet poster seen hanging in

  • Teepee's room and Cuba Gooding Jr.'s character Rod Tidwell asking "What Have You Done for

  • Me Lately?", paying homage to Jackson's hit of the same name.

  • Cameos Philadelphia Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie, ESPN

  • draft guru Mel Kiper Jr., former NFL quarterbacks Drew Bledsoe, Troy Aikman, and Warren Moon,

  • German ice skater Katarina Witt, then-current Dallas Cowboys head coach Barry Switzer, and

  • former Detroit Lions coach Wayne Fontes play themselves in the film.

  • Other NFL players that make cameos as themselves are Tim McDonald, Johnnie Morton, Rick Mirer,

  • Rob Moore, Ki-Jana Carter, Herman Moore, Art Monk, Kerry Collins, and Dean Biasucci.

  • Sportscasters Al Michaels, Frank Gifford, Roy Firestone, Mike Tirico, and Dan Dierdorf

  • also make cameos. Former NBA basketball player Brent Barry is

  • featured in the film as an athlete who refuses to sign an autograph for a young boy.

  • Actresses portraying ex-girlfriends of Maguire include Lucy Liu, Ivana Miličević, Alison

  • Armitage, Emily Procter and Stacey Williams. Reagan Gomez-Preston also had a minor role

  • in the film as part of the Tidwell family. Alice in Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell makes

  • a brief appearance in the film as a copier store clerk.

  • Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay makes a cameo as Jerry Maguire's boss.

  • Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner is seen briefly as an SMI CEO as Maguire departs the

  • company. Artie Lange filmed a scene for the film, but

  • it was cut from the final version of the movie. Product placement

  • Tristar received merchandise and marketing services of over $1.5 million from Reebok

  • in exchange for incorporating a commercial into the film and depicting the Reebok brand

  • within certain agreed-upon standards; when the film was theatrically released, the commercial

  • had been left out and a tirade including "broadsides against Reebok" was included. When the film

  • aired on television, the Reebok commercial had been embedded into the film as originally

  • agreed upon. Release

  • Box office The film debuted at number one. It earned

  • $17,084,296 its opening weekend, and eventually grossed $153,952,592 in North American box

  • office and approximately $119.6 million overseas for a $273,552,592 worldwide total, on a budget

  • of $50 million. It is the ninth top grossing film of 1996 and the fourth highest-grossing

  • romantic drama film of all time. Critical response

  • The film received critical acclaim, with an 85% positive reviews on the film-critics aggregate

  • Rotten Tomatoes. Its critical consensus states: "Anchored by dazzling performances from Tom

  • Cruise, Cuba Gooding Jr., and Renée Zellweger, as well as Cameron Crowe's tender direction,

  • Jerry Maguire meshes romance and sports with panache." Cuba Gooding, Jr. won an Academy

  • Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Rod Tidwell, the Arizona Cardinals football

  • player who sticks with Maguire. Cruise was also nominated for Best Actor in a Leading

  • Role and the movie marked Renée Zellweger's breakout role. The film itself was nominated

  • for an Academy Award for Best Picture, and crew members on the film were nominated for

  • Best Screenplay and Best Film Editing awards. Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave

  • the film 3/4 stars, writing that there "are so many subplots that Jerry Maguire seems

  • too full" and also commented that the film "starts out looking cynical and quickly becomes

  • a heartwarmer." Todd McCarthy of Variety wrote "An exceptionally tasty contempo comedic romance,

  • Jerry Maguire runs an unusual pattern on its way to scoring an unexpected number of emotional,

  • social and entertaining points. Smartly written and boasting a sensational cast, Cameron Crowe's

  • shrewdly observed third feature also gives Tom Cruise one of his very best roles..."

  • In June 2010, Entertainment Weekly named Jerry Maguire one of the 100 Greatest Characters

  • of the Last 20 Years. Accolades

  • Home media Jerry Maguire was first released on VHS and

  • Laserdisc on May 29, 1997. It is the best-selling non-Disney VHS tape of all time, with over

  • 3 million copies sold on the first day and another 1 million on the second day and sold

  • 1 million copies each day, including Blockbuster Video, Hollywood Video, Wal-Mart, Target,

  • Best Buy and many other rental stores/retail chains. The previews shown before the movie

  • were: My Best Friend's Wedding, Men in Black and Starship Troopers. it was re-released

  • on VHS around late 1999, without any of the aforementioned previews.

  • The film was first released onto DVD on June 24, 1997 and around 2002 respectively in both

  • a standard edition and a two-disc "Special Edition". While the standard edition contains

  • no special features, the two-disc edition primarily includes deleted scenes, commentary

  • tracks, featurettes, and a music video for Bruce Springsteen's "Secret Garden." The film

  • was later released onto Blu-ray on September 9, 2008, with the same special features found

  • on the second disc of the DVD "Special Edition." Legacy

  • Jerry Maguire spawned several popular quotations, including "Show me the money!", "You complete

  • me," "Help me help you," "The key to this business is personal relationships" and "You

  • had me at 'hello'", and "Kwan," a word used by Cuba Gooding, Jr.'s Tidwell meaning love,

  • respect, community, and money to illustrate the difference between himself and other football

  • players: "Other football players may have the coin, but they won't have the 'Kwan'."

  • These lines are largely attributed to Cameron Crowe, director and screenwriter of the film.

  • Zellweger said of filming the famous "hello" line, "Cameron had me say it a few different

  • ways. It's so funny, because when I read it, I didn't get it — I thought it was a typo

  • somehow. I kept looking at it. It was the one thing in the script that I was looking

  • at going, 'Is that right? Can that be right? How is that right?' I thought, 'Is there a

  • better way to say that? Am I not getting it? I just don't know how to do it.'"

  • A video blog "Everything is Terrible!" is running a campaign to salvage remaining VHS

  • copies of the movie. In June 2008, AFI revealed its "Ten Top Ten"—the

  • best ten films in ten "classic" American film genresafter polling over 1,500 people from

  • the creative community. Jerry Maguire was acknowledged as the tenth best film in the

  • sports genre. It was also voted by AFI as #100 on its list of 100 Passions. The quotes

  • "Show me the money!" and "You had me at 'hello'" were also ranked by AFI on its list of 100

  • Movie Quotes, ranked #25 and #52 respectively. American Film Institute Lists

  • AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies – Nominated AFI's 100 Years...100 Laughs – Nominated

  • AFI's 100 Years...100 Passions – #100 AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs:

  • Secret Garden – Nominated

  • AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes: "Show me the money!" – #25

  • "You had me at "hello."" – #52 "You complete me." – Nominated

  • AFI's 100 Years...100 Cheers – Nominated AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies – Nominated

  • AFI's 10 Top 10 – #10 Sports Film Soundtrack

  • The motion picture soundtrack CD includes: Music not on the soundtrack

  • Includes: AC/DC – "For Those About to Rock"

  • Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass – "The Lonely Bull"

  • The Durutti Column – "Requiem Again" Nirvana – "Something in the Way"

  • Tom Petty – "Free Fallin'" The Replacements – "I'll Be You"

  • The Rolling Stones – "Bitch" Merrilee Rush – "Angel of the Morning"

  • a clip of John Coltrane, Miles Davis, and Charles Mingus performing

  • "Secret Garden", originally a Springsteen track from 1995, was re-released in 1997 after

  • its exposure in the film and on the soundtrack, and peaked at No. 19 on the Billboard Hot

  • 100. The film was scored by director Crowe's then-wife,

  • Nancy Wilson, who was a member of the rock band Heart.

  • References

  • External links Jerry Maguire at the Internet Movie Database

  • Jerry Maguire at Metacritic The Jerry Maguire Journal, a log kept by Crowe

  • during the film's production and published in Rolling Stone in December 1996.

  • "Things we think and do not say", the memo that led Maguire to establish his own agency.

  • Archived from the original on November 9, 2012.

  • Jerry Maguire, film script Leigh Steinberg talks about Cameron Crowe

  • and the film

Jerry Maguire is a 1996 American romantic comedy-drama sports film starring Tom Cruise,

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Jerry Maguire

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    Jenkai posted on 2015/10/11
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