Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • You may have thought that we started late, but it is ironic that the first speaker

  • would be the author of the book, "Procrastinate on Purpose".

  • (Laughter)

  • How is it, that we have more tips and tricks, tools and technology,

  • calendars and checklists than ever before,

  • and yet, we still always seem to be behind?

  • How is it that we work longer hours,

  • we're moving faster than we've ever moved in history,

  • and yet we never seem to be caught up?

  • How is it that we know more about time management today,

  • and yet stress is at an all-time high?

  • The reason why is because everything you know

  • about time management is wrong.

  • I first started to realize this a couple of years ago.

  • It was early on a Saturday morning, I was at my business partner's house,

  • and I was picking him up for a very important

  • international leader planning retreat,

  • and he has a 2-year-old baby girl name Haven,

  • and she is the sweetest little thing you can imagine.

  • She has curly brown hair, and these sweet, soft, brown eyes,

  • and we live in Nashville, so she has a little southern accent that's developing

  • and as I'm picking up Dustin, and we're about to leave,

  • Haven come sprinting down the hallway

  • and she leaps, and she latches on to Dustin's leg,

  • and she says: "Daddy where you going?"

  • And he looks down at her and he says:

  • "Oh, I'm sorry baby Haven, Daddy actually has to go to work today."

  • And she looks up at him, and her eyes well up with tears,

  • and she says:

  • "No Daddy, please, no work today. No work Daddy."

  • And in that moment, I realized two things:

  • The first is that I myself am not ready to have kids just yet.

  • (Laughter)

  • The second is that even though everything that you've ever heard

  • about time management is all logical, tips and tricks, tools and technology,

  • calendars and check lists, its apps, it's all logic.

  • What I realized in that moment, from a 2-year-old,

  • is that today, time management is no longer just logical,

  • today, time management is emotional,

  • and how our feelings of guilt, and fear, and worry, and anxiety, and frustration,

  • those things dictate how we choose to spend our time,

  • as much as anything that's in our calendar, on our to-do list.

  • In fact, there is no such thing as time management.

  • You can't manage time, time continues on whether we like it or not.

  • So there is no such thing as time management.

  • Really, there is only self-management.

  • That was the first big realization I had.

  • In order for you to understand the second,

  • I want to take you on a quick history of time management theory,

  • and that really began in the late fifties, and sixties,

  • and it came during the industrial revolution,

  • and an early time management thought was all about --

  • it was one-dimensional, and it was all based on efficiency,

  • and the idea with efficiency, was that if we could develop tools and technology

  • to help us do things faster, then theoretically,

  • that would give us more time.

  • Well, there's nothing wrong with efficiency, all things being equal,

  • efficiency is better, and yet there is an unfortunate limitation

  • to efficiency as a strategy for time management,

  • and it's evidenced very well by the fact that we all carry around

  • miniature computers in our pockets,

  • and yet, somehow, we're still never caught up.

  • Well, in the late eighties, era 2 time management thinking emerged.

  • I feel like it was pretty much single-handedly ushered in

  • by the late, great Dr. Stephen Covey.

  • And Dr. Covey introduced what we're referring to as 2-dimensional thinking.

  • He gave us something called the Time Management Matrix,

  • where the x-axis was urgency, and the y-axis was importance,

  • and the beauty about this was that it gave us a system for scoring our tasks,

  • and then based on how they scored in these two areas, we could prioritize tasks,

  • one in front of the other.

  • Prioritizing is all about focusing first on what matters most,

  • and for the last 20 years,

  • this has been the pervasive mode of thinking

  • as it relates to time management theory.

  • It's not that there's anything wrong with prioritizing, in fact,

  • prioritizing is as valuable a skill today

  • as it ever has been in history.

  • Even though we throw that word around,

  • like it's the end-all and be-all, to time management theory, right?

  • We say: "Get your priorities in order.",

  • or "You don't have the right priorities."

  • Well, unfortunately, maybe that's not really the case,

  • because there is a massive limitation to prioritizing that nobody ever talks about

  • and that is this: there's nothing about prioritizing that creates more time.

  • All prioritizing does, is take item number 7 on your to do list,

  • and it bumps it up to number 1, which is valuable in and of itself,

  • but it doesn't do anything inherently to create more time,

  • and it does nothing to help you accomplish the other items on your to-do list.

  • If you think about efficiency, it is kind of like running on a hamster wheel,

  • and if you think a prioritizing, it's really about borrowing time.

  • Borrowing time from one activity to spend on another, it's kind of like juggling,

  • and that really describes the way that we even talk about time.

  • I'm juggling a lot, or I'm trying to balance a lot.

  • And in that paradigm there's only two strategies:

  • one is to do things faster, or to do more things,

  • and that is what the world kind of feels like, right?

  • How does it feel to know that really all we are is a bunch of juggling hamsters,

  • sprinting towards an inevitable crash landing?

  • (Laughter)

  • You cannot solve today's time management problems,

  • with yesterday's time management thinking.

  • What we've noticed, is the emergence of a new type of thinker,

  • somebody that we refer to, as a multiplier,

  • and multipliers use what we call, 3-dimensional thinking.

  • While most people only make decisions based on urgency, and importance,

  • multipliers are making a third calculation which is based on significance,

  • and if urgency is how soon does something matter,

  • and importance is how much does it matter,

  • then significance is how long is it going to matter.

  • It's a completely different paradigm, it's adding on to what is there,

  • it's in with the old, but it's also in with the new.

  • Because most of us, if you think about the modern day to-do list,

  • which is one of the key strategies or tools that we have,

  • we ask ourselves, when we assemble our to-do list, we say:

  • "What's the most important thing I can do today?"

  • But that is not how multipliers think; multipliers, instead ask the question:

  • "What can I do today, that would make tomorrow better?"

  • "What can I do right now, that would make the future better?"

  • They're making the significance calculation.

  • When I say: "Multiply your time," that might sound a little bit superfluous.

  • It might sound like an over exaggeration, but it really is not.

  • Now, it is true that we all have the same at a time inside of 1 day,

  • 24 hours, 1,440 minutes, 86,400 seconds.

  • There's nothing any of us can do to create more time in 1 day,

  • but that's exactly the problem, that type of thinking is the problem.

  • We have to break out of that paradigm, and instead, think about tomorrow,

  • and that brings us to the premise for how you multiply time.

  • The way that you multiply time, is simple:

  • you multiply your time, by giving yourself the emotional permission

  • to spend time on things today, that give you more time tomorrow.

  • That's the significance calculation.

  • You multiply time, by giving yourself the emotional permission

  • to spend time on things today, that create more time tomorrow.

  • The significance calculation changes everything.

  • The Focus Funnel is our attempt, to create a visual depiction

  • that codifies the thought process, that multipliers go through in their head,

  • unconsciously, when they are evaluating how to spend their time.

  • It's why some people create extraordinary, explosive, exponential results,

  • and other people seem to kind of just create linear traction,

  • and it works like this, if your tasks all come into the top of the funnel,

  • the first question a multiplayer asks is: "Can I eliminate this?

  • Is it even worth doing?"

  • It's another example of how everything you know about time management is wrong,

  • or at least that it has changed, because most of us use to-do lists,

  • and multipliers realize that next generation time management

  • has much more to do with what you don't do, than what you do do.

  • Multipliers realize that perfection is achieved

  • not only when nothing more can be added, but when nothing more can be taken away.

  • It is the permission to ignore.

  • Because anything that we say no to today,

  • creates more time for us tomorrow.

  • The challenge emotionally is that we struggle with guilt,

  • and we struggle with wanting to say no,

  • but really feeling like we have to say yes,

  • and so we go through life trying to never say no.

  • In an interview with a multiplier

  • they said something that changed my life,

  • "It's futile to go through life, trying to never say no.

  • What you have to realize, is that you are always saying no to something."

  • Because anytime you say yes to one thing,

  • you're simultaneously saying no to an infinite number of others.

  • If you can't eliminate the task, the next question is: "Can I automate the task?"

  • Anything that I create a process for today, saves me time tomorrow.

  • It's like setting up online bill pay.

  • I never have two hours in my day to set up online bill pay,

  • I just don't have time, and if I had two hours in my day

  • I would never use it to set up online bill pay.

  • But a multiplier realizes that if I save 30 minutes a month

  • from paying my bills, by setting up online bill pay,

  • then it makes sense to invest those 2 hours,

  • because then after just 4-months time,

  • I will have broken even on that investment,

  • and every month thereafter, I will get something we call ROTI,

  • Return On Time Invested.

  • Automation is to your time

  • exactly what compounding interest is to your money.

  • Just like compounding interest takes money and it makes money into more money,

  • automation takes time, and it makes it into more time.

  • The way that wealthy people think about money

  • is exactly the same way that Multipliers think about time,

  • and they give themselves the permission to invest,

  • invest the time and energy to automate the process.

  • If it can't be automated, then the question is:

  • "Can it be delegated? Can I teach someone else how to do this?"

  • I'm reminded of a time, when I was 7 years old, and I'll never forget,

  • I was in the car with my Mom, and I hit her with this question, I said:

  • "Mom, do I have a Dad?"

  • And as you might imagine, that was a pretty difficult question

  • for a single mother, to navigate with her 7-year-old.

  • It was the first time that my mom told me her life story.

  • She was pregnant at 17, divorced a couple of years later.

  • Pregnant again at 22, and then she was divorced

  • from my biological father 6 months after I was born.

  • So there she was, 22 years old, single mom, no high school education,

  • and she explained to me:

  • "Rory, I decided at that point that I would never have a man in my life,

  • because I haven't had good luck with men, and we may not have a lot,

  • and we may not have a dad, but we're going to have love."

  • We went back and forth, and I said:

  • "You know Mom, I love our family, I really do, I love our family,

  • but I think it would be really cool to have a Dad."

  • And so she said:

  • "Well, I'll tell you what honey, if you want a Dad,

  • then why don't you go out, and find yourself a good Dad."

  • What kind of crap is that?

  • (Laughter)

  • It just so happened that that was my first day at a new Shaolin Kung Fu center.

  • I had been studying martial arts since I was 5.

  • So they put me in this all-adult school, to be a little more advanced.

  • Another gentleman who walked in, it was his first day, also.

  • This guy was much older than me.

  • He had long hair, and tattoos all up and down his arm,

  • and a leather jacket, and he came in on a motorcycle,

  • and this guy was about the scariest dude you can imagine, if you're 7 years old,

  • and he gets paired up as my sparring partner.

  • (Laughter)

  • His name was Kevin. He turned out to be pretty nice.

  • We advanced through the belt levels together,

  • and so Kevin started bringing me home from class, every once in a while.

  • Soon Kevin came over on the weekends, and we would practice our forms.

  • Then we caught a movie, and then before long,

  • Mom came with us to the movies.

  • So it was the 3 of us going to movies together,

  • and I'll never forget the first time the 2 of them went to a movie

  • without me.

  • (Laughter)

  • As it turns out,

  • Kevin and I tested for our black belts together on the same day

  • when I was 10 years old.

  • They got married 2 weeks later.

  • A couple of years after that Kevin adopted me,

  • and I change my last name, from Rory MacLachlan, to Rory Vaden,

  • and they have been married for 20 years, ever since.

  • (Applause)

  • And the point of that story is that you can delegate anything.