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  • OSHO

  • OSHO International Foundation presents

  • Osho: Books I Have Loved

  • I have loved reading from my very childhood.

  • My own personal library

  • consisted of one hundred fifty thousand rare books

  • of all the religions, philosophies, poetry, literature.

  • And I have read all of them,

  • but with no purpose; I enjoyed it.

  • My father used to go

  • at least three, four times to Bombay,

  • and he would ask all the children,

  • "What would you like?"

  • And he would ask me also,

  • "If you want anything

  • I can note it down and bring it from Bombay."

  • I never asked him.

  • Once I said, "I only want you

  • to come back

  • more human,

  • less fatherly, more friendly,

  • less dictatorial, more democratic.

  • Bring a little more freedom for me when you come back."

  • He said, "But these things are not available in the market."

  • I said, "I know they are not available in the market,

  • but these are the things I would like: a little more freedom,

  • a little bigger rope,

  • fewer orders, fewer commandments,

  • and a little respect."

  • No child

  • has asked for respect.

  • You ask for toys,

  • sweets,

  • clothes,

  • a bicycle,

  • and things like that. You get them,

  • but these are not the real things which are going to make your life

  • blissful.

  • I asked him for money only when

  • I wanted to purchase more books;

  • I never asked money for anything else.

  • And I told him,

  • "When I ask for money for books

  • you had better give it to me."

  • He said, "What do you mean?"

  • I said, "I simply mean that

  • if you don't give it to me then I will have to steal it.

  • I don't want to be

  • a thief

  • but if you force me

  • then there is no way.

  • You know I don't have money.

  • I need these books

  • and I am going to have them, that you know.

  • So if money is not given to me

  • then I will take it;

  • and remember in your mind that it was you who forced me to steal."

  • He said, "No need to steal.

  • Whenever you need money you simply come and take it."

  • And I said, "You be assured it is only for the books,"

  • but there was no need for the assurance because

  • he went on seeing my library growing in the house.

  • Slowly there was no place in the house

  • for anything other than my books.

  • And my father said, "Now,

  • first

  • in our house, we had a library;

  • now in the library, we have a house!

  • And we all have to take care of your books

  • because if something goes wrong with any book you make so much fuss,

  • you create so much trouble

  • that everybody is afraid of your books.

  • And they are everywhere;

  • you cannot avoid stumbling on them.

  • And there are small children...."

  • I said,

  • "Small children are not a problem to me;

  • the problem is the older children.

  • The smaller children -- l respect them so much

  • that they are very protective of my books."

  • It was a strange thing to see in my house.

  • My younger brothers and sisters were all protective of my books

  • when I was not there:

  • nobody could touch my books.

  • And they would clean them and they would keep them

  • in the right place, wherever I had put them,

  • so when I needed any book I could find it.

  • And it was a simple matter because I was so respectful to them,

  • and they could not show their respect in any other way

  • than to be respectful to my books

  • I said, "The real problems are the older children

  • my uncles, my aunts,

  • my father's sisters,

  • these are the people...my father's brothers-in-law --

  • these are the people who are the trouble.

  • I don't want anybody else

  • to mark my books, underline in my books,

  • I hated the very idea that somebody should underline in my books.

  • One of my father's brothers-in-law --

  • he was a professor

  • so he must have been in the habit --

  • would write notes on my books.

  • I had to tell him,

  • "This is simply

  • not only unmannerly, uncivilized,

  • it shows

  • what kind of mind you have.

  • To me a book

  • is not just a book, it is a love affair.

  • If you underline any book

  • then you have to pay for it and take the book.

  • Then I don't want that book here,

  • because one dirty fish

  • can make the whole pond dirty.

  • I don't want any book prostituted -- you take it."

  • He was very angry

  • because he could not understand.

  • I said, "You don't understand me because you don't know me much.

  • You just talk to my father."

  • And my father said to him, "lt was your fault.

  • Why did you underline his book?

  • Why did you write a note in his book?

  • What purpose did it serve to you? --

  • because the book will remain in his library.

  • In the first place you never asked his permission,

  • that you wanted to read his book.

  • You will be surprised

  • that by the time I was a matriculate

  • I had read

  • thousands of books

  • I was finished

  • with Kahlil Gibran,

  • Dostoevsky,

  • Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gorky,

  • Turgenev.

  • When I was

  • finishing my intermediate

  • I was finished with Socrates, Plato, Aristotle,

  • Bertrand Russell --

  • all the philosophers that I could find in any library,

  • in any

  • bookshop,

  • or borrow from anybody.

  • Why did you stop reading in 1980 and

  • how do you stay informed on world events?

  • I've heard that you enjoy movies...

  • and watch movies at times. Is that true?

  • Once in a while, because I don't read any more.

  • Otherwise I was

  • perhaps the most

  • educated man in the whole world.

  • My own personal library was one hundred fifty thousand volumes,

  • of immense value,

  • and I was reading continuously.

  • But then I got my own truth

  • and all those books started seeming rubbish.

  • Slowly slowly

  • they became meaningless. Once in a while one book

  • may turn out

  • to have some significance,

  • but five years before I stopped it.

  • It was too much.

  • You read one hundred books

  • and one book sometimes turns out to be of any meaning.

  • And that too is not going to

  • increase my consciousness, my being.

  • So for five years I have not read anything --

  • no newspaper, no radio, no television.

  • Once in a while if my

  • sannyasins see a film which they feel

  • has something significant,

  • then I see it.

  • But very rarely.

  • For example, Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov,

  • when it became a film

  • then I saw it because I consider that book

  • to be far more valuable than holy Bible.

  • It is

  • so immensely rich with insights.

  • So it happens once in a while

  • that they bring something

  • if they feel that

  • it may interest me. Then I see it. But rarely.

  • Featuring: "Music From the World of Osho" Source: The Last Testament, Vol 1 #26 ; From Misery to Enlightenment #15; The Last Testament, Vol. 3 #4

  • Copyright © Osho International Foundation, Switzerland. OSHO ® is a registered TM. For more information, visit: www.osho.com

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OSHO: Books I have Loved

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    trailylee posted on 2015/09/29
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