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  • [Singing]

  • E, what you...? Hi. James from engVid. I've noticed my friend, E, is putting butter

  • all over his little wormy body, and standing in the sun. I think he wants to be tanned.

  • This is not the best way to get a tan, by the way. I'm just telling you. Don't put butter

  • on yourself and sit in the sun. But this is strange: "Butter me up, baby." Hmm. And then:

  • "Flattery will get you everywhere with Mr. E." What does that mean? That's today's lesson.

  • What we want to talk about is "criticism" and "praise", or "criticize" and "praise".

  • We have synonyms we're going to work with, and then some common popular expressions.

  • Right? To help you be able to use them in real life, so you can become like a native

  • speaker. And let's go to the board to start.

  • We have a little seesaw here. or heehaw, whatever. And you notice a balance, it's balancing down

  • for criticize, because criticism is usually considered negative. Okay? And praise is usually

  • considered good. So you can think of devil - dun-dun-dun-dun", or angel - aaah. Okay?

  • So, when we say somebody criticizes something it's they say something bad about something.

  • Okay? "The food is too salty, it's too hot. The room's too warm. The car's too big." They

  • criticize it. When they praise it, they might say: "It's very roomy", or: "The food is full

  • of flavour", or: "You did a good job." To praise. Opposites. Right?

  • So let's go start over here because I'm that kind of guy, and I'm going to look at "critic".

  • So the noun, a person who criticizes is a critic. Now, a critic doesn't necessarily

  • always have to be negative. It's considered negative, because when a critic speaks, they're

  • going to talk about the things that didn't go well or weren't as good as they thought.

  • Okay? Now, a critic is also a job, because they might go see a movie or a book, and they'll

  • tell you what they loved about the book. But no critic will keep their jobs if they just

  • say: "Everything was just great. I loved everything. I love all of the movies." They won't have

  • a job very long, because people say: "Not everything's good." So a critic's job is to

  • look at things, maybe say some things are good, but to tell you what was missing and

  • what could have been done better. So that's an official job, a critic. But a critic could

  • also be someone who finds faults, so we mean they look for things to be wrong, and then

  • mention it. They can't just be happy. You're eating dinner, it's a good restaurant, but

  • the lighting's not quite right and they're like: "Everything good, but the lighting wasn't

  • right and I don't like it." Why do you got to be such a critic? Why do you have to bring

  • something negative?

  • The second one is "cynic". Oh, sorry, I'm wrong. "Pessimist". A pessimist... Unlike

  • a critic, a critic as I said can be a job or someone who finds some fault. A pessimist

  • sees almost everything in a negative light. They see any situation, in a person - they

  • see the worst or something bad. You say: -"It's a beautiful sunny day. Like the birds are

  • out, children are smiling. I got a new car, a new job." -"It's going to rain soon." -"Why

  • you got to bring that up? The children are out, everything's good. Why do you have to

  • talk about it?" -"It will rain. It always does." -"Yes, but not today." Okay? So a pessimist

  • will say something will happen or you go: -"Look at my brand new car." -"It will break

  • down." -"Okay. Leave it alone. I just got it. Okay?" Pessimist.

  • So, cynic, we get it. Could be a job or someone finds some fault in something. Okay? A pessimist

  • sees everything is negative, there's always a negative something to everything. It's not

  • just looking at a book. Life's a bad situation. "You're born and you're going to die." This

  • is a pessimist. They can't see: but you are alive.

  • So what's a "cynic"? Or what's this "kynikos", kynikos, kynikos. K9, k-ni-, kyninikini. Well,

  • let's look. This is actually a Greek word, and this Greek word has to do with doglike.

  • So what does doglike and cynic have to do? Well, the pessimist is negative about everything.

  • Everything's bad. Sun: "Oh, the sun's out. You're going to get cancer." I'm drinking

  • water. "Yeah, you're going to have to pee." Nothing is good. A cynic is a special brand

  • of animal. A cynic, my friend, thinks that people only do things for themselves; it's

  • all about you. They're always about self-interest. They're not saying everything in the world

  • is bad. They don't think the sun is necessarily bad or water is bad, but they think... A cynic

  • is: -"Oh, he helped you move the couch. He wants a date." Everything someone does is

  • for a reason. They're looking for self-interest. That's what cynics think.

  • So, why this word here? Well, it's really a Greek word. You see, the Greeks use this

  • word, K9, if you know the word for dog is K9, kynikos, it means like a dog. This word

  • means like a dog. So a cynic sees people like a dog. A dog [pants like a dog] does everything

  • for self-interest. Right? It's man's best friend because it will... [Pants like a dog]

  • Wants a home and wants food. It loves you because you will take care of it, and they

  • think cynics are like that. They only look for interest for themselves. "What am I going

  • to get? That's why I did it." So anything humans do that are good, a cynic thinks you

  • did it for a reason because you benefit. And that's what makes it different from a pessimist.

  • So, hey, even if you speak English, you just got schooled, Bub. Okay? A pessimist sees

  • everything negatively, a critic picks certain things, while a cynic looks at the human animal.

  • Right? [Pants like a dog] Like a dog.

  • So what's a "backseat driver"? Got to put it up there. Ladies, gentlemen, you know you're

  • driving and you're driving 50 and the speed limit's 50, there's always some idiot in the

  • back, saying: "Just go 60. There's no one on the road. I don't know why you don't go

  • 60. And you know, you could also..." That's called a backseat driver. They are a critic

  • of the worst kind. They tell you how to drive when they're sitting in the back and it's

  • all relax for them, got a drink in one hand, hamburger in the other one: "Hey, you know

  • what else you can do?" They got all the answers. Right? You know what I'm talking? You know

  • who I'm talking about. There's that one person. And it's worse, they don't sit in the backseat,

  • they actually sit beside you and tell you how you should drive, and you just want to

  • go: "Okay, take the wheel. Drive. I would like to relax." So a backseat driver always

  • has something to say about what you're doing. Usually it's involving a car. It doesn't have

  • to be backseat; it can be right beside you, and they've got criticism that they spew...

  • Spew, throw out like vomit, blah, at you as you drive. So you're like: "I would kill you

  • if I didn't have to drive this car right now. That's right." Okay? And it came from backseat

  • because usually it was the person in the back who didn't have a license who had all the

  • advice. Okay, we're done.

  • These are the nouns. Okay? You can even say that about a relationship, even. Like: "You

  • don't have a girlfriend. Why are you telling me what to do, you backseat driver? Get a

  • girlfriend, then talk to me." Okay, sorry. It just went there. I went there.

  • All right, "disparage", "lambaste", and "denounce." These are synonyms for the verb "criticize".

  • We talked about what criticize means, okay? So now we're going to talk about the action.

  • "Disparage", many of us native speakers talk about disparaging or lambasting and denounce,

  • and you go: "It's the same. You know, it's the same." Enh - wrong. When you disparage

  • someone or something, you give it little value or worth. When someone's disparaging you,

  • they're saying: "You have little value or worth. Maybe you shouldn't exist. You're valueless."

  • So disparage somebody's work is to say it has little value. It means it means nothing

  • to anyone; it's not important to anyone. Mm, interesting. Put that away. [Laughs]

  • "Lambaste". Okay, I like to do things to help me remember, and in this case, you know, if you think about Easter, those little lambs,

  • They are so cute, innocent and nice. Okay? So you've got the word "lamb". This will help you remember.

  • Trust me. And "baste", when we baste things in English, we cook it. You know, you cook

  • it on the oven, and slowly cook it. You totally cook it, so you burn that meat, you eat it,

  • you kill it. When you lambaste something... I'm sorry. To lambaste something is to attack

  • it violently. So you're attacking something. Now think of that [baas like a lamb], that

  • little innocent lamb being attacked violently over and over. So when you lambaste somebody,

  • you seriously and strongly and severely criticize them. You just go after them and you just

  • kill them. So when you think of lambaste, think of the lamb being cooked, that innocent

  • little lamb going around and around, going: "He-e-e-elp me", and somebody's barbequing

  • the hell right out of it. Okay? That's to lambaste. Severely criticize. It's one thing

  • if someone criticize you, lambaste is to literally destroy you, violently attack. Whew, got that

  • out of my system.

  • "Denounce". I love this one. A lot of religions do it and politicians. "We denounce you!"

  • It means to say publicly you think something is wrong or evil. Okay? See the little devil

  • thing? "It's evil. I denounce you." So if your parents denounce you, that's some serious

  • stuff. Almost better to be lambaste. I don't know. Tough stuff either way, if you ask me.

  • So when we're looking at the verb for "criticize", we can go from "disparage", say you have little

  • worth; "lambaste you", attack you violently; or "denounce" you and publically say: "I consider

  • you evil and wrong in all ways." Man, this negative stuff is not good. Okay. No wonder

  • they thought people were like dogs. Look at the things we come up with.

  • Okay, but you know what? Now to go on the side of the angels, aaah. Let's start praising

  • people. Funny enough, I couldn't find a lot of words about praise. And I think it has

  • to do with English does have a sort of a history with religion with our language, and it's

  • okay to criticize because criticizing is what we do for humans. Right? But praising is usually

  • something we do for the gods above us, so there's not many words for it. In fact, when

  • you come over here, you're going to see some of the words for praising aren't really that

  • good if you're a human talking about another human, but that's another story.

  • Let's go to the board. When you praise somebody or something, it's to say that that person

  • of goo-... Is good or institution is good. "McDonald's makes great hamburgers and they

  • make the best Chicken McNuggets." We're praising their service. We're saying they're good at

  • what they do. They're good, which is the opposite is to criticize.

  • So, what do you call a person who says nice words about the work somebody else does? Why,

  • boys and girls, I could only find one word that we actually use regularly, and it is

  • the word "flatterer". "To flatter", as a verb-I didn't put it here because I have to explain-is

  • to say nice things. The problem is "flatter" is it means to say things you don't really

  • mean. Like you're saying to somebody who is not necessarily or not really beautiful: "You're

  • beautiful, and your hair is like, like, like the finest straw, so dry and so, so falling

  • apart. And your legs are like broomsticks, they have no shape and it helps people who

  • have to", do you understand? You say nice things that aren't really... You don't believe

  • them, but you say them. Usually when you want to get a job or a date or you want somebody

  • to do something, you flatter them and say: "My, James, you look good today." I'm like:

  • -"Really? I do?" -"No, I don't think so. Yes you do!" -"Don't flatter me." Remember here?

  • Flattery will get you everywhere, because we're all suckers, which means we like to

  • be told nice things, we want to believe them,

  • and we'll do nice things to keep hearing nice things.

  • Here's the problem: "flatterer" is supposed to be a good word, but it can be negative

  • because it means insincere or not real praise. Huh? Sorry, kids, I did my research. There

  • are other words we can use that are similar to "flatterer" that the dictionaries threw

  • out for me. Want to see a couple of them? "Bootlicker", a boot looker-, licker. I'm

  • wearing some boots. Is a person who's like [licks boot] you do not lick somebody's boots.

  • If someone is from Saudi Arabia watching right now, they're like: "Oh my Lord!" because this

  • is such a bad thing I'm showing the boot. This is bad in many countries. Never show

  • your foot to someone. A bootlicker actually [licks] licks these boots. So to be a boot

  • licker is similar to being a flatterer. There's another word I'm not allowed to use, but maybe

  • I can. You can be a [makes noise] licker. See? I didn't say it, you two people, so you

  • can't get upset with me. I didn't say it. Okay?

  • Another one is a "brown noser". What do I mean by "brown noser"? Imagine this is somebody's

  • bum, imagine this is your nose. You put your nose inside their bum and go: "You're lovely.

  • I just love you. You're the best person in the whole world." That's a brown noser. Do

  • you know what comes out of people's nose? That's right, they're full of that stuff,

  • ladies and gentleman. So this is the closest word I can get to a person who praises someone.

  • There is no such word as a "praiser", or an "applauder", or a "complimenter". They don't

  • exist for some strange reason, but we've got all of these negative words. I love my language.

  • Next: so why don't we talk about the verbs? We do have some verbs you can use to talk

  • in a positive way about something. You can "applaud" somebody. Applause is like this,

  • clapping. You're like: "You did a great job. We applaud you." It's another way of saying

  • "approve". Not even "praise", we approve. We say: "What you did was okay." "Compliment",

  • we can compliment you. And we can "congratulate" you. -"Way to go, Johnny!" -"Thanks, Bob!"

  • We can do all of these verbs to praise you, but it's not the same as praise because praise

  • is like speaking up and saying: "Oh, you're wonderful and godlike." Okay?

  • We do have words that are similar to "praise", but what I found was most of these words are

  • religious. So to "glorify", "exalt", and "eulogize". You won't find people saying these at times

  • like: "We exalt Brad Pitt." No, but they will exalt God and they will glorify God, and eulogize

  • this. So it's not used in common speech, but if you go to church and you're religious,

  • I just made you the A1 brown-noser for the priest. Okay? Sorry. I'm just joking.

  • All right, so I've got a little box here, and every once in a while we put something

  • in the box, so you want to pay attention here, and it's something that will help you. Because

  • sometimes you might see the word "critic" and "critique". Now, if you've never seen

  • them before, you're going to go like: "Hmm, they seem the same. I think it's the same."

  • And I'm going to teach you now, there's a couple of differences that you want to be

  • aware of. A "critic", as we discussed, is a noun, a person who reviews or says bad things.

  • Right? They review magazines or papers and movies, and gives you some idea like is a

  • good movie or bad one, or they'll say negative things about things. Also, it's a short sound:

  • "Critic", i-i-i. Not a long vowel sound. Okay? So that's one of the difference. Person and

  • it's a short vowel sound. When we look at "critique, critique, critique", it's a long

  • sound. Right? So we've got: it's a noun, that's the one difference, it's a noun. You can make

  • a critique on something. Sorry. It's only got one "i" in there. You can make a critique

  • about something. Okay? But it's also a verb, they're critiquing your work, meaning they're

  • looking at your work carefully because this is a detailed review of a subject or some

  • kind of work. So they're critiquing the work now, which is a verb. "Critic" can't do that.

  • Right? We have to say: "Criticize", we have to change the word. But a "critique" can be

  • used as a verb or a noun. "Critic" is simply a noun. And don't forget: when we have the

  • short vowel sound here; when you say "critique", it's a long sound. It's the long "e", "e":

  • "critique". Cool? There you go. Just in case you get confused, now you won't. Helped you.

  • Pay attention to the special boxes - all those little things that might come up and be confusing,

  • we're going to make them not confusing for you. Anyway, you know what we got to do now?

  • Of course, we've learned some words, we've learned, you know, the positive and the negative.

  • Why did he say that?

  • That's the next part when we come back. Right? Are you ready?

  • Back in a flash.

  • [Snaps] And we're back. Whew, you know what? Not to criticize you guys, but man, you're

  • making my day really long with all these explanations. Let's go to the board. Shall we? Let's be

  • positive. "Praise", we talked about doing popular expressions, and we're going to start

  • off with the praise, the positive way. "Praise", "p", "positive". Remember that. Okay?

  • "Something is first rate". When you say something is first rate, think of the number one, or

  • "top notch", okay? We're saying think of top is like the very high, like the top of my

  • head. We're saying it's the best. We can use this for things or people. "That hotel is

  • top notch." One of the best. "He's a top notch student." Very good. "She's a top notch mathematic...

  • Mathematician or first rate mathematician." First, premier, number one. Okay? So "first

  • rate" means the best. We can use it for people or things. All right?

  • "Somebody is on the ball". Can you imagine...? Okay, here's a ball and somebody's standing

  • on it. It's very difficult to stand on the ball. All right? So you have to work hard.

  • When we say somebody is on the ball, there's a couple of meanings. Number one, we're like:

  • "They know. They know their stuff. They know the latest trends and they know the newest

  • information; they're on the ball." It's also they're doing their job. Remember I told you

  • being on the ball is difficult? When they're on the ball, they've got stuff... They know