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  • Hi, guys. Yeah, all right. Yeah. Oh, uh-oh. How embarrassing. I have a little problem.

  • Do you know what it is? I've made a mistake today when I got dressed. My name's Ronnie.

  • Sometimes in the morning when I get dressed, I do things wrong, I make mistakes because

  • it's so early. I mean, come on. Who wakes up that early and can get dressed properly?

  • Today I'm going to teach you about mistakes you make when you get dressed. Some of them

  • are embarrassing, but I'll teach you what they mean, and what you're going to say to

  • someone if you notice an embarrassing mistake.

  • First of all, and the most embarrassing is: "Fly is down or open". Fly? Open fly. Fly,

  • airplane, fly... What? "Your barn door is open". I don't even have a barn. What are

  • you talking about? "Your fly is down or your fly is open." This means on your pants where

  • your little weenie comes out, or where you unzip your pants-zip-it means you forgot to

  • do the zipper up or the buttons up on your pants. Maybe people can see your underwear.

  • Oh, I hope you wore underwear. Oh, god, what could you see? So, one really embarrassing

  • thing that might happen to you is your fly is down, which means-zip-you didn't zip up

  • your pants. So I would say: "Do it up." I don't want to see your tighty whities or your

  • superhero, Superman underwear. Or do I? Do you have Superman underwear? That would be

  • cool. Just do up your fly.

  • We have the next word: "inside out". This is what happened to me today. True story.

  • I went to work, woke up in the morning, I put on my shirt, and I went to work, and I

  • came home for lunchtime, and I noticed: Huh, my shirt is on inside out. That means that

  • the tag is sticking out and I need to reverse my shirt. So I can say: "My shirt is inside out."

  • So, my mother would tell me: "Put it on properly." Which would mean I would take

  • my shirt off, and put it right side in.

  • Oh yeah, I've done this before, too. I've put my pants on backwards. How could...? How

  • could you achieve such a feat? I am pretty spectacular when it comes to getting dressed.

  • So: "My pants are on backwards." And again, you would say to the person: "Put them on

  • properly." Have you ever put your pants on backwards, like not on purpose, by mistake?

  • I've done it. I've ridden my bicycle. I was on my bike, went to the restaurant, went to

  • look in my back pocket, realized my back pocket was my front pocket and went: "Yeah, these

  • are on backwards." That's funny. I hope my fly's not down.

  • And children do this. Do you have a child? Your child maybe has not learned yet the right

  • and left. It's a hard concept, don't laugh at them. So, maybe your daughter's shoe is

  • "on the wrong foot", and she kind of walks differently like a duck. And you go: "Oh,

  • your shoe's on the wrong foot. Put it, put the shoe on the right foot." English is so

  • confusing because we have the right foot and the left foot, but we actually mean correct.

  • So: "Put it on the right foot", and you're like: "But I have one right foot and one left

  • foot." It means the correct foot.

  • And you can have something "on the wrong hand". If you have mittens, okay? These are gloves,

  • these are mittens. Sometimes children put the mittens on the wrong hand, so it looks

  • like their thumbs are over here. That's funny. They're like: "Hi, I'm a crab baby." And so:

  • "His mitten is on the wrong hand." Again, we would say: "Put it on the right hand",

  • and the left one, which means the correct hand.

  • This happens to me a lot. Something has become "untied"-this is an adjective-or "undone".

  • So: "My shoelace is untied/undone." This means the same. So, what you're going to do is you're

  • going to "tie it up". Now, the other thing that you can say is: "My shoelaces are undone."

  • We're not really too worried about the grammar in this, but you would say: "Tie them up."

  • Maybe somebody at your work is quite fat or chubby and they pop the button their shirt,

  • or they just didn't do up the button and you can see their tummy. Eww, their hairy, hairy

  • tummy. You can say: "His button is undone." or: "Her button is undone." And you would

  • tell the person: "Do it up."

  • Oh, on the other hand, if a lady says to you... This beautiful lady, Judy Holliday, if she

  • says: "My dress, please undo my dress", you say: -"Yes, ma'am." -"Well, thank you, sailor.

  • Can't do it myself."

  • This irritates the crap out of me when my sock or my pants "keep falling down". So you're

  • out, you're walking around, you got to pull them up and pull them off, or you have the

  • one sock that's lost its elasticity, which mean it just falls down constantly. One sock.

  • The other sock's cool, it's doing its job, but the other sock keeps on falling down.

  • So, you can say: -"My sock or my pants keep falling down." -"Pull it up." for the sock;

  • "Pull them up." for the pants. Because pants are... Pants. Pants are plural... Try saying

  • that seven times fast. Pants are plural, pants are plural. Pants, we have to use the

  • plural of "them". "Pull them up." Because my sock is only one, you'd say: "Pull it up."

  • Be careful.

  • This one's kind of strange, too. If you have a shirt that buttons up like my shirt-you

  • can't see-sometimes you button it and it kind of looks like this, and you go: "Oh, man,

  • what's happened to me today? I've skipped" or you can say: "I've missed a button." That

  • means that the top button is the second button, and then you kind of look... Everyone kind

  • of looks crooked. So we would say: "Do it up again." So you have to undo it, do it up.

  • This irritates me. Today I saw a lovely young lady, and her tag... She had her shirt on

  • the right way. Her shirt was right side in, but her tag was sticking out. It was flipped

  • out and sticking out of her shirt. Now, I wanted to just fold it back in, but you can't

  • just really go up to people and touch them. It's kind of weird, and illegal, and I don't

  • know what repercussions that would have. But I wanted to tuck her tag in, because I could

  • see it hanging out. So, if you say to someone: "Your tag is sticking out", they will say:

  • "Oh", and they're going to stick it back in. Stick it in.

  • And last one, one of my favourites: "Your shirt is untucked." Did you go to a school

  • that had a uniform? I did. One thing I really, really, really, really hate doing is tucking

  • in my shirt. So that means your shirt is put inside of your massive camel toe of your pants.

  • Oh, why do I have to draw things like this? So tucking in your shirt means you put your

  • shirt inside your pants. Okay? If your shirt is untucked, it means that your shirt is not

  • inside your pants. More comfortable, feels better, looks nicer, I think, but the school

  • that I went to was adamant: "You tuck in your shirt." Why? Does it make me smarter if I

  • tuck in my shirt? Does it make my life better if I tuck in my shirt? Hell no. I am not tucking

  • in my shirt. This landed me a couple hours in detention, which means I had to stay after

  • school, because I didn't tuck in my shirt. It's your choice. You can tuck your shirt

  • in or you can untuck your shirt. Usually at a job, if it's a very formal office setting,

  • you must tuck in your shirt. If your shirt is untucked, you got to tuck it in.

  • Have you ever had any of these embarrassing dressing mistakes happen to you? If so, let

  • me know. I'm going to go and change. See you later.

Hi, guys. Yeah, all right. Yeah. Oh, uh-oh. How embarrassing. I have a little problem.

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B1 US shirt sock tuck fly foot embarrassing

Learn English – Dressing up WRONG!

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    Chao Joanne posted on 2015/08/03
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