Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • The reality of Brazil's state as the World Cup looms over the country is a far cry

  • from the perfectly measured pitches

  • golden sands and incredible landmarks of Latin America

  • Death, corruption, poverty, violence,

  • drugs and prostitution run rife through the nation and its many slums

  • better known in Brazil as favelas

  • 600 thousand foreign tourists are expected to descend upon the nation 600

  • thousand people that Brazil has paid to accommodate. People that will come for

  • a month

  • and then leave but the effect on the local population has been

  • devastating and could last for years if you want to know the truth

  • about what's happening in Brazil you're in the right place I'm going to tackle

  • each section separately so here's your chance to pick and choose the area

  • you want to find out about

  • for those on mobiles and tablets I've stuck the timings in the description below

  • Prostitution is legal in Brazil

  • that may be shocking to hear for some but something even more shocking is

  • that in March 2013

  • Brazil's Higher Court of Justice ruled that adults having sex with a child is not

  • necessarily

  • considered a crime. Since 2009 the age of consent has been

  • 14 years old. Children as young as

  • 10-years-old are being forced to sell themselves on the street in order to make

  • money from fans coming over

  • if you saw kids on the street during a normal celebration it would be completely

  • innocent in Brazil it could mean something entirely different

  • In preparation for the World Cup the prostitutes in Brazil have been offered

  • an opportunity

  • the chance to learn English to entertain the foreign visitors

  • Igor Fuchs, a volunteer teacher says we teach basic expressions and also have

  • demonstrations with erotic paraphernalia

  • so they can learn the names, how to use them and how to propose them. Both women and

  • children are being exploited to squeeze money

  • out of the tourists.

  • Individuals in Brazil may be protesting their rights to basic amendments

  • a fair wage, public transport and security but as a collective

  • they also represent a fight for progression and to fix what the past has left behind

  • Rio alone has 763 favelas

  • which are home to 1.4 million people

  • 22 percent of the population. The poor living near the beaches, hotels and

  • shopping districts

  • have been chased back to the slums and many have lost their homes

  • to construction.

  • The Landless Workers' Movement marched the streets of Sao Paulo

  • against urban developments which have left many homeless.

  • An indigenous protest in Brasilia marched against the backdrop of the Mane Gurrincha

  • National Stadium

  • the most costly of them all. Protesting against the rise in real estate prices

  • and forcing lower-income families out of their homes.

  • Some could say the authorities are trying to sweep the dirt under the rug.

  • The people of Brazil deserve basic human rights meaning good health care,

  • education, food and sustainable living. The month-long tournament has brought wealth

  • to the nation

  • a wealth spent on constructing stadiums and giant state projects

  • which has bought only 0.2 percent

  • to add to Brazil's economic growth of this year.

  • Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff has defended the $11 billion

  • dollar expenditure on the tournament but local residents say that the development

  • projects they were promised

  • have been delayed or were never spoken of again.

  • This graffiti in the Vila Flavia shantytown take center stage in showing the hardships of life

  • that people here are tired of seeing with the World Cup

  • as a backdrop.

  • The World Cup has brought the construction of many stadiums to host the matches.

  • This has left numerous unfinished infrastructure projects which will be

  • rushed to completion.

  • The way many Brazilians see it is giant state projects run by the government

  • full of injustice, lacking safety, being mismanaged

  • and halting any advancement in society. This safety and mismanagement

  • has led to death.

  • The death toll when this video was made stood at an estimated nine people.

  • A worker building the monorail in Sao Paulo died after construction collapsed,

  • one by electric shock, three fell to their deaths, 1 suffered injuries after

  • dismantling a crane

  • two died under a crane collapse and one died in a fire.

  • All these tragic deaths symbolize the danger that the workers face in trying to

  • complete the construction for the tournament. This statistic doesn't even

  • take into account the people killed in pacifying

  • the warring favelas. Brazil's murder rate has more than doubled over the

  • past three decades according to latest research.

  • Brazil slum are wracked

  • with violence. Widespread protests kicked off years ago and small scale demonstrations

  • continue.

  • A police unit to pacify urban areas and lower crime rates was launched

  • in 2008 which did work for a while with a 50 percent drop in homicide

  • rates in Brazil. That is until now.

  • Despite efforts by police to rid the favelas of crime before the tournament starts

  • it has had little impact.

  • President Rousseff has said the country is ready

  • but Metro worker strikes and demonstrations from Brazil's people

  • threatened to coincide with the beginning of the tournament.

  • Rousseff said, "there are people who claim the resources for the World Cup should've

  • been directed to health care and education

  • I hear and respect those opinions but I don't agree with them.

  • It is a false dilemma.

  • Protests have descended into rubbish fires and Molotov cocktails from the people.

  • Tear gas, rubber bullets and pepper spray from the police.

  • The anarchic group Black Bloc led an anti World Cup protest march in Sao Paulo on

  • May 24

  • They are linked with destroying banks, trashing public property

  • throwing petrol bombs and attacking police with stones and clubs.

  • People have resorted to violence against the vast sums of public money being spent

  • on the World Cup

  • as opposed to being used to ensure acceptable health care

  • education and housing. Nearly two billion has been spent on security alone

  • deploying a hundred

  • thousand police and fifty seven thousand troops although the place had initial

  • success

  • in evicting gangs from the slums the move has been criticized as just

  • displacing them elsewhere. With violence on the rise again in the pacified areas it

  • appears

  • drug traffickers are seeking to regain their lost territory.

  • According to Compassion International in Fortaleza that

  • approximate thirty-five thousand inhabitants earn less than the minimum

  • wage

  • of 223 dollars a month with families of up to 10

  • sharing less than 20 square meters in space.

  • All the children wnat is to be far from home so they quit studying and become an

  • easy target for the drug dealers

  • in order to maintain their addiction they simply go to the streets.

  • And where there are celebrations there are drugs and where do those drugs come from?

  • Drug traffickers. The First Capital Command cartel known as PCC in brazil threatened

  • to launch

  • the 'World Cup of Terror' as a powerful gang responsible for the murder of more than a

  • hundred up the city's police officers

  • this threat aims to show the Brazilian authorities how much control

  • the gangs have. The favelas are in conflict to who will be in charge of drugs demand

  • for the World Cup and the pacifying police are taking on the areas

  • one by one with many innocent being caught in the crossfire

  • According to reports they'll only be able to take back

  • forty of a thousand favelas by the time the World Cup starts

  • Soccer in Brazil was a turning point for those who didn't have much money

  • something accessible that's what it represented

  • The FIFA World Cup 2014 is the most expensive in history and

  • leaves many homeless, exploited or even

  • dead.

  • up

The reality of Brazil's state as the World Cup looms over the country is a far cry

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 UK brazil world cup cup tournament police sao paulo

The Dark Side of the World Cup 2014 - Truthloader

  • 153 10
    賴珮琪 posted on 2015/08/01
Video vocabulary