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  • Thank you.

  • Oh, that's lovely. Thank you.

  • (GASPING)

  • -Lady Russell. -My dear Anne.

  • You look quite done for.

  • I came back as soon as I received your letter.

  • I had no idea the position was so ruinous.

  • Unfortunately, a person who's contracted debts must pay them.

  • -Even if he is a gentleman. -Was there no possibility of retrenchment?

  • Unfortunately, Father and Elizabeth could find no means of lessening their expenses

  • without compromising their dignity,

  • or relinquishing their comforts in a manner simply not to be borne.

  • But I have, at last, persuaded Father to let out the house.

  • And if I can ensure that we live within our means somewhere less extravagant,

  • then, in only a few years, we may be solvent again.

  • In a few years?

  • In any event, it is better than selling. At least one day I may hope to return.

  • And where are you to go in the meantime? Is it decided?

  • All my hopes were for a small house nearby,

  • but Father and Elizabeth are settled upon Bath.

  • (ALL CHUCKLING)

  • Lady Russell.

  • Dear neighbour, you've been in London, I hear.

  • Sir Walter. Elizabeth.

  • May I say how truly sorry I am that you must leave Kellynch.

  • We are blameless, Lady Russell, quite blameless.

  • Every sacrifice has been made, however painful.

  • We cut off all unnecessary charities at once, Lady Russell.

  • And even refrain from new furnishing the drawing room,

  • which, as you know, Mama left the most frightful state.

  • And still it is a comfort to know we've done all we could.

  • Of course.

  • Ah, but here's Shepherd. He's promised us some news.

  • Is that his daughter with him?

  • Mrs Clay's husband passed away not long ago. She has returned to her father's house.

  • She's often with us, recently.

  • Lady Russell. Miss Anne.

  • Sir Walter, I have this very morning received an approach for the lease of Kellynch

  • that I'm convinced must meet with your absolute approval.

  • An admiral, sir,

  • recently retired and a native of this county desires to settle in this very part of the world.

  • -An admiral? -I should have much preferred a gentleman.

  • The navy has its uses, no doubt,

  • but I should be sorry to see any friend of mine belonging to it.

  • -Indeed, Sir Walter? -Yes.

  • It is, in two points, offensive to me.

  • The first is being the means of raising persons of obscure birth into undue distinction,

  • and second, you never see a naval man who is not most shockingly knocked about,

  • exposed as they are to wind and weather till they're simply not fit to be seen.

  • Nevertheless, Sir Walter, the admiral has a very substantial fortune,

  • and I have no doubt of him being a most responsible tenant.

  • (SCOFFS)

  • And consider, Sir Walter,

  • how he will look around and bless his good fortune

  • to be in the home of a baronet of such a prominent and distinguished family.

  • Yes.

  • SHEPHERD: Then, with your permission, sir, I shall open negotiations with Admiral Croft.

  • -Croft? -Yes.

  • Are you acquainted with the gentleman, Miss Anne?

  • Yes. No, um...

  • That is to say, I'm familiar with his career.

  • I'm not fond of the idea of my shrubberies being always approachable by the tenant.

  • If you will excuse me, there's still much to do.

  • (KNOCKING AT DOOR)

  • Good heavens, Anne.

  • -What is the matter with you? -Nothing. I assure you, I'm quite well.

  • Anne...

  • Who is Admiral Croft,

  • and why did he cause you to be out of countenance so?

  • Anne!

  • Admiral Croft's wife is...

  • -Is... -Mrs Croft?

  • Indeed.

  • And Mrs Croft is the sister of Captain Frederick Wentworth.

  • Wentworth?

  • I see.

  • And to think that soon he may be walking through this house.

  • Anne, you know that your father thought it a most unsuitable match.

  • He would never have countenanced an alliance he deemed so degrading.

  • He was not alone, as I recall.

  • My dear...

  • To become engaged at 1 9,

  • in the middle of a war, to a young naval officer

  • who had no fortune and no expectations,

  • you would, indeed, have been throwing yourself away.

  • And I should have been failing in my duty as your godmother if I did not counsel against it.

  • You were young,

  • and it was entirely prudent to break off

  • the understanding.

  • Prudent it may have been and yet,

  • Captain Wentworth has made his fortune in the war

  • and is now extremely wealthy.

  • Has he written to you?

  • No, never a word.

  • I've only the newspapers for my authority.

  • Then...if his intentions towards you had been truly sincere,

  • would he not have contacted you when his circumstances changed?

  • I do not blame you,

  • nor myself for having been led by you.

  • But nevertheless,

  • I think very differently now from what I was persuaded to think eight years ago.

  • Oh, my dear Anne.

  • You are a good and beautiful young woman. I promise you this,

  • one day you will find someone to love you as you deserve.

  • I'm 27.

  • Before I forget, Shepherd,

  • if you have no objection, I have a mind to engage your charming daughter

  • as a companion to Elizabeth.

  • Oh, Sir Walter.

  • Well, I'm sure, sir, Penelope will be greatly honoured by such a distinction.

  • Then it is settled. She shall come with us to Bath tomorrow.

  • Is not Anne companion enough for Elizabeth?

  • PENELOPE: Oh, but Anne is going to Uppercross.

  • I received a letter only this morning from sister Mary.

  • She is indisposed, again, and requires Anne to come and look after her.

  • And since nobody would want Anne in Bath,

  • I wrote back straightaway to say she should come as soon as she'd finished everything here.

  • Well...

  • All your hopes were for a small house nearby.

  • Do send our regards to the Musgroves.

  • Before you go, Anne,

  • on no account must you forget to visit each house in the parish to take our leave. It is expected.

  • ANNE: Is he married?

  • I do not know that he is,

  • and yet, so eligible a gentleman would surely by now have formed an attachment.

  • Will he bring his wife here?

  • And his children?

  • I only pray that I am spared any meeting.

  • I know my chance of happiness has passed forever,

  • but to be reminded of it by his presence here would,

  • I'm certain, be more than my spirits could bear.

  • Who is that young lady, Mr Shepherd?

  • Oh, that is Miss Anne Elliot, Admiral, Sir Walter's middle daughter.

  • The only one with any sense.

  • A pity, then, that we did not make her acquaintance.

  • She is but half a mile away at Uppercross with her sister.

  • Oh, well then, we certainly shall make her acquaintance.

  • Is she married, Mr Shepherd?

  • Sadly no, ma'am. Nor, I think, at her age, is likely to be.

  • Well.

  • It is certainly roomier than a frigate.

  • (CHUCKLES)

  • Such a number of looking glasses. There's no getting away from oneself.

  • I think this room would do very well for Frederick.

  • Let us see if he comes.

  • Your brother seems dead set against the whole idea of Kellynch.

  • I fear Somerset has unpleasant memories for him.

  • There was once talk of an engagement to a girl in the county.

  • -There was? -Eight years ago or so.

  • We were in the East Indies at the time.

  • He's never spoken of it, but his heart was quite broken, I believe.

  • Well, well, well.

  • -Frederick engaged, who would have thought it? -Indeed.

  • -I sometimes wonder if he will ever settle down. -Hmm.

  • So, you are come, at last.

  • I'd begun to think I should never see you.

  • I am so ill

  • I can hardly speak.

  • In fact, I do not think I was ever so ill in my life as I have been all this morning.

  • I'm very unfit to be left alone, I'm sure.

  • Is Charles not here?

  • Charles would go out shooting, even though I told him I was ill.

  • And I have not seen a soul this whole, long morning.

  • Not one of the Musgroves has seen fit to come and see me

  • even though Charles told them I was ill.

  • It did not suit, I suppose.

  • Oh, you will see them yet, I'm sure. It is still early.

  • Or, perhaps, if you feel well enough to attempt a short walk

  • to the great house, we could call upon them.

  • We ought to wait till they call upon you.

  • They should know what is due to you as my sister.

  • I assure you I have not the smallest objection on that account.

  • Perhaps a little air would do me good.

  • But I really must eat something first, I'm quite starved.

  • LOUISA: Anne!

  • -Good heavens! How the girls are growing up. -Mmm-Hmm.

  • The Miss Musgroves have returned from their school in Exeter

  • with all the usual accomplishments, and, of course,

  • they now think of nothing but being fashionable

  • and merry...

  • Dear Henrietta, Louisa!

  • Oh, Anne!

  • Here you are at last! Come, Mama cannot wait to see you.

  • And we have such exciting news.

  • (GIRLS LAUGHING)

  • Welcome to Uppercross, Miss Anne!

  • How pale and drawn you are.

  • We must fatten you up while you are here.

  • I myself have been very unwell.

  • And Sir Walter and Miss Elizabeth. Oh, how they shall miss you.

  • In any event, I'm very happy to be here and not in Bath.

  • Oh, Mama, I hope we shall be in Bath this winter.

  • But remember, if we do go, we must be in a good situation.

  • Oh, yes. None of your Queen's Squares for us.

  • -Anne, how are you? -Very well. Thank you, Charles.

  • (ANNE EXCLAIMING)

  • -You're getting big. -I am glad to see you've recovered, my dear.

  • Did you ask your father? Did you, Charles?

  • Father has many other uses for his money and the right to spend it as he likes.

  • Charles, if it is left to you, we shall soon be destitute.

  • Admiral Croft and his wife are to take possession directly.

  • And I believe we have been very fortunate with our tenants.

  • Yet it must be very hard for you, my dear, to give up your home so.

  • Of course, when your poor dear Mama was alive, there was moderation and economy at Kellynch.

  • But there were never balls,

  • and the Crofts are sure to have balls and invite the most eligible young naval officers.

  • Indeed, this is our exciting news, I quite forgot.

  • Mrs Croft, it appears, has a brother, Captain Wentworth,

  • and he has just returned to England and is coming to stay with them at Kellynch.

  • It is true. The Pooles chanced to make their acquaintance in Taunton this week.

  • It is said Captain Wentworth is the most handsomest man

  • in the navy and quite unattached.

  • -And has such a wealth of Spanish gold. -Indeed.

  • ANNE: How fortunate he is.

  • Well, we shall all see for ourselves when he comes to dine tomorrow night.

  • Oh, Papa!

  • I have just now received this note from Admiral Croft accepting my invitation.

  • Anne! Are you ready?

  • We must not keep the Crofts and Captain Wentworth waiting.

  • MUSGROVE: Charles! Charles!

  • Charles! Come directly. Charles!

  • (PEOPLE CHATTERING FRANTICALLY)

  • He fell from a tree in the garden.

  • I've sent for the apothecary. He will be here directly.

  • His collarbone is dislocated.

  • (GAGGING)

  • Charles, look after Mary. We shall be all right.

  • ANNE: Ready?

  • (SNAPPING)

  • All done. With a little rest, he'll be right as rain in no time.

  • CHARLES: Oh, thank God.

  • And never fear, Charles, I shall give your excuses to the Crofts.

  • (STAMMERING) Excuses?

  • Indeed, with the child going on so well now, it would be a shame to spoil the dinner.

  • I am really most anxious to meet our new neighbours.

  • Indeed, it's more a duty than anything else.

  • (STAMMERING) If Anne will stay with you, my love, I have no scruple at all.

  • Of course.

  • And so we are to be left to shift for ourselves

  • with a sick child, while you go to dinner with the Crofts.

  • Well, I need not stay too late, dearest.

  • Just because I'm the poor mother who is not allowed to stir, because he is going on so well.

  • He says... How does he know he is going on so well...

  • Please.

  • You may all leave little Charles to my care.