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  • Apollo's Tree by Samantha Moore

  • The Greek Myth as retold by Marie Pope Osborne from her book "Favorite Greek Myth"

  • one day, when Apollo,

  • the god of light and truth, was a young man

  • he came upon Cupid, the God of Love, playing with one of his bows.

  • "What are you doing with my bow ?"

  • Apollo asked angrily.

  • "Don't try to steal my glory, Cupid."

  • "I've slain a great serpent with that weapon"

  • "play with your own little bow and arrows"

  • "Your arrow may slice serpents Apollo", said the God of Love

  • "but my arrows can do worse harm"

  • "even you could be wounded by them"

  • with that ominous threat

  • Cupid flew into the sky and landed on top of the high mountain

  • then he pulled two arrows from his quiver

  • one had a blunt tip filled with lead

  • whom ever was hit with this arrow would run from anyone professing love

  • the second arrow was a sharp tip and made of gold

  • whoever was hit with this arrow would instantly fall in love

  • Cupid aimed his first arrow at Daphne, a beautiful nymph, hunting deep in the woods

  • Daphne was a follower of Diana

  • Apollo's twin sister and a Goddess of wild things

  • like Diana, Daphne loved her freedom

  • as she roamed in the woods and fields

  • with her hair in wild-disarrayed and her limbs bare to the sun and rain

  • Cupid pulled the bowstring back and shot the blunt-tipped arrow at Daphne

  • when the arrow flew through the air, it became invisible

  • and when it pierced Daphne's heart

  • she felt a sharp pain but knew not why

  • holding her hands over her wound

  • Daphne rushed to the river god, her father

  • "father", she shouted

  • "you must make me a promise"

  • "what is it?" called the Gods who stood in the river surrounded by water nymphs

  • "promise I will never have to get married", Daphne cried

  • but the river God confused by his daughter's frantic request

  • called back "but I wish to have a grandchildren"

  • "No, father, no. I never want to get married."

  • "Please let me always be as free as Diana"

  • "But I want you to marry", cried the God

  • "No", screamed Daphne

  • she beat the water with her fists

  • then rocked back and forth and sobbed

  • "Alright", shouted the river God

  • "Do not grieve so, Daphne"

  • "I promise I'll never make you marry"

  • "And proimise you'll help me excape my suitors" cried the huntress

  • "I promise I will", cried the river God

  • after Daphne secured this promise from her father

  • Cupid aimed his second arrow

  • the sharp gold-tipped one at Apollo, who was wandering in the woods

  • just as the young guy came upon Daphne

  • Cupid pulled back the tight string of his bow

  • and shot the golden narrow into Apollo's heart

  • the God instantly fell in love with Daphne

  • even though the huntress's hair was wild

  • she wore only rough animal skins

  • Apollo thought that she was the most beautiful girl he'd ever seen

  • "Hello", he cried

  • but Daphne gave him a startled look

  • then bolted into the woods like a deer

  • Apollo ran after her, shouting "stay, stay"

  • but Daphne fled as fast as the wind

  • "Don't run, please", cried Apollo

  • "You flee like a dog, flees an eagle"

  • "but I'm not your enemy, don't run from me"

  • Daphne continued to run

  • "Stop", Apollo cried

  • Daphne did not slow down

  • "Do you know who I am?" said the God

  • "I am not a farm-boy or a shepherd

  • "I am Lord of Delphi, son of Jupiter"

  • "I've slain a great serpent with my arrow"

  • "but alas, I felt Cupid's weapon has wounded me worse"

  • Daphne continued to run

  • her bare limbs lit by the sun and her soft hair wild in the wind

  • Apollo grew tired of begging her to stop

  • so he began to pick up speed on the wings of love

  • running more swiftly than he'd ever run before

  • the God of light and truth gave the girl no rest

  • until soon, he was close upon her

  • her strenth gone. Daphne could feel Apollo's breath on her hair

  • "Help me, father", she cried to the river God."Help me"

  • No sooner had she spoken these words

  • then her arms and legs grew heavy and turned to wood

  • then her hair became leaves, and her feet became roots, growing deep into the ground

  • she had become a laurel tree and nothing was left in her

  • but her exquisite loveliness

  • Apollo embraced the tree's branches as if they were Daphne's arms

  • he kissed her wooden flesh

  • and he pressed his hand against the tree's trunk and wept

  • "I feel your heart beating beneath this bark", Apollo said

  • tears running down his face

  • "Since you can't be my wife, you'll be my sacred tree"

  • "I'll use your wood for my harp and for my arrows"

  • "I'll weave your branches into a wreath for my head"

  • "heroes and scholars will be crowned with your leaves"

  • "You'll always be young and green, my first love, Daphne"

  • Now, let's look some of the literary element of the the Myth

  • We will discuss the elements of the plot, characterization, and language

  • First, let's discuss the elements of the plot

  • This is the shape of a typical plot line

  • it is made of three major parts

  • The first is the rising action

  • the rising action is the series of events,leading up to the high part of the story

  • which is called the climax

  • the climax is the point of highest tension and is often the turning point of story

  • the last part is the following action

  • which deals with the affects of the climax

  • and the impact it has on the characters

  • let's relate these ideas to the plot of Apollo's tree

  • a few events in the rising action are Apollo and Cupid argue

  • Dephne's father promises to protect her from suitors

  • and Apollo falls in love with Daphne

  • the climax is when Daphne turns into a laurel tree

  • in the following action, Apollo promises to use the tree for building arrows

  • and that heroes and scholars will wear laurel wreaths

  • let's talk about characterization

  • there are two basic roles in every fictional story

  • the first is the protagonist

  • this usually is the main character of the story

  • the second is the antagonised

  • who opposes the protagonist and usually starts conflict

  • In Apollo's tree, our protagonist is Apollo.

  • our antagonist, was looking for trouble, is Cupid.

  • now, we'll discuss the language of Apollo's tree

  • we'll focus on one element of language, which is called a simile.

  • a simile, is a figure of speech which compares two unlike things using the words "like" or "as"

  • can you remember an example of a simile from the myth

  • here's one

  • you flee like a dove flees an eagle

  • this quote, spoken by Apollo, compares Daphne to a dove and himself to an eagle

  • we've discussed the elements of the plot

  • characterization and the language of the Greek myth "Apollo's Tree"

  • I hope you learned a lot and enjoyed "Apollo's Tree"

Apollo's Tree by Samantha Moore

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Apollo's Tree

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    Claire Chi posted on 2015/07/09
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