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  • safety rules and regulations that we know

  • under the hazard communication standard are now changing

  • including changes in the Material Safety Data Sheets

  • labels and warning requirements

  • OSHA's hazard communication standard

  • known as hazcom will now integrate

  • into the United Nations globally harmonized system of classification and

  • labelling

  • of chemicals

  • it will now be known as the hazard communication

  • any globally harmonized system

  • or simply the GHS

  • the purpose of this videos to review the major changes that you're going to see

  • the GHS or

  • globally Harmonized System will now require chemical manufacturers to

  • provide specific criteria

  • to address health and physical hazards as well as classification of chemical

  • mixtures

  • labels will be required to show much more information than before

  • for example chemical manufacturers and importers must provide a lable that

  • includes

  • a signal word a pictogram a hazard statement and precautionary statement for

  • each

  • hazard class and category

  • what we now know as material safety data sheets

  • are now going to be shortened in name and will be known

  • simply as safety data sheets or SDS

  • instead of MSDS

  • Safety Data Sheets or SDS

  • will now have a new format

  • that has 16 specific sections

  • ensuring consistency in presentation

  • of important protection information OSHA's hazard communication standard is

  • designed to ensure that information about chemical hazards

  • and associated protective measures are disseminated to all workers

  • this standard has been revised to include the GHS

  • the major changes you should know right now are hazard classification

  • this replaces hazard determination hazard classification provides specific criteria

  • for classification of health and physical hazards

  • as well as classification of mixtures labels

  • chemical manufacturers and importers will be required to provide a label

  • that includes a harmonized signal word pictogram

  • and hazard statement for each hazard class and category

  • Safety Data Sheets will now have a specified

  • 16 section format in the new GHS

  • all chemicals will now be classified into three major hazard groupings

  • the first and the largest is physical hazards

  • this includes items like explosives

  • flammable gases and aerosols flammable solids

  • gases under pressure self reactive substances that can react violently with

  • water

  • and other solid substances that emit a flammable gas when wet

  • oxidizers like oxygen and hydrogen peroxide

  • and corrosives which are either strong acids strong bases

  • or concentrated solutions of certain weak acids or weak bases

  • they can exist as any state of matter including liquids

  • solids gases mists or vapors

  • the next major has a group is health hazards examples of health hazards

  • include acute toxicity

  • for example hydrogen cyanide is a highly toxic substance

  • acute exposure at relatively low doses can result in death

  • skin corrosions or irritants can cause severe skin burns

  • and/or eye damage another health hazard is serious

  • eye damage or eye irritation, then respiratory or skin sensitization

  • sensitizers can cause severe organ damage or major permanent

  • functional changes in organ systems, for example the lungs

  • Germ Cell Mutagenicity. These are chemicals which may cause mutations in

  • the germ cells of humans

  • and then these mutations can be transmitted to offspring.

  • Carcinogens. These are chemicals associated with causing cancers.

  • Other toxic chemicals that affect the reproductive organs or other specific

  • organs

  • and aspiration hazards. The third major hazard grouping is environmental hazards

  • this is new and OSHA does not have jurisdiction over environmentally toxic

  • chemicals

  • the labeling and SDS requirements under GHS

  • require environmental labeling but OSHA considers this portion of the

  • standard

  • non-mandatory as environmental hazards are regulated by the EPA

  • therefore we will not be concerned with this area it is being mentioned here for

  • information purposes only.

  • Let's talk about the Material Safety Data Sheet

  • or as we know it now the old MSDS. The old MSDS have been found to be less

  • useful

  • in many circumstances because it did not contain enough information

  • the new safety data sheets or SDS will replace the nine part

  • MSDS with a 16 part document although that

  • sounds more complicated you'll find that much more information

  • is being presented in a much better way. The SDS

  • is product related and although it is not able to provide information that is

  • specific for any given workplace where the product may be used

  • the expanded SDS information will include much more data

  • funneled down into a better document to help us understand the chemicals we are

  • using

  • the SDS will enable people to develop an active program of worker protection

  • measures

  • including training that is specific to your individual workplace

  • and to consider any measures that may be necessary to protect the environment.

  • Information in an SDS also provides a source of information

  • for other workers such as those involved with the transport of dangerous goods

  • emergency responders, poison centers,

  • and finally, consumers. The new standardized SDS format will make

  • finding hazard and chemical information on the SDS

  • easier for both employers and employees.

  • There's no set format to the Material Safety Data Sheet and they can range in

  • length from one page to 20 or more pages

  • the new Safety Data Sheet will contain

  • only 16 headings all SDS will be in the standard format

  • which will make it easier for all of us to find the information

  • that we need for our workplace. The SDS headings

  • sequence and content are similar to many of the items required

  • by other regulatory organizations. Reviewing the headings give you an idea

  • of how comprehensive the information will be.

  • In the new standardized format Safety Data Sheets

  • the first thing that will be provided is an identification of the product or

  • chemical.

  • Next, the hazards within the product will be identified

  • and the composition or other information will be provided

  • about ingredients.First aid measures will be discussed as well as fire

  • fighting measures

  • and that will be followed by a section that discusses how to handle

  • accidental releases. Handling and storage is the next category,

  • and then the eighth category will discuss exposure control

  • or your personal protection what kind of PPE may be needed when

  • handling the product. Physical and chemical properties will be explained

  • followed by the stability and reactivity information and then toxicological

  • information.

  • The next three sections ecological information, disposal considerations,

  • and transport information are not required by OSHA,

  • but may be included in the safety data sheet, and the last two sections will be

  • regulatory information and then any other information deemed pertinent

  • by the manufacturer or an outside regulatory agency.

  • Here the first two pages of a sample Safety Data Sheet. Note the specific

  • sections.

  • All safety data sheets will have the sections or headings in this order and

  • in this format.

  • This will make finding specific information much easier.

  • There is not a standard format for the GHS label.

  • However, there are required label elements.

  • The GHS label elements that you see here with an asterisk

  • have been standardized and are directly related to the hazard level.

  • The other label elements are defined based on common definitions.

  • But these three elements, hazard pictograms, signal words, and hazard

  • statements

  • are all hazard warnings and are required to be grouped together

  • on the label. The symbols, signal words, and hazard statements have all been

  • assigned

  • to specific hazard categories and classes.

  • On labels, the GHS system uses only two words:

  • Danger and Warning are used to inform the chemical user of the severity of the

  • hazards in the chemical.

  • The use of just two signal words is used to help simplify warnings

  • and the labeling system. For example, thinking about the word danger

  • imagine yourself driving up to an intersection with a stop sign

  • the signals to the driver that this is a potentially dangerous intersection

  • and that the driver is required to stop and look before proceeding through the

  • intersection.

  • If the signal word on a label is danger, the chemical user should understand that this

  • is a highly hazardous chemical

  • and they should stop and become familiar with all the characteristics of the

  • product before proceeding.

  • On the other hand, if the label contains the word warning

  • this is like driving up to an intersection controlled by a yield sign.

  • The driver can proceed through the intersection with caution as it also has

  • the potential to be a hazardous intersection.

  • However, labels that contain the signal word "Warning" indicates that the severity

  • of hazards of the chemicals

  • are less than those chemicals classified with the signal word

  • "Danger." Hazard statements are supposed to give the chemical user additional

  • information

  • about the hazard that is depicted in the pictogram. For example,

  • if you saw the flame pictogram on a label for a flammable liquid

  • the hazard statement might be "keep away from fire, sparks

  • and heated services. as stated earlier hazard statements have been standardized

  • and the chemical manufacturer,

  • importer, or distributor is responsible for using the appropriate hazard statement or

  • statements

  • on the label. The other statements shown are more examples

  • of standardized hazard statements. Pictograms

  • are now required. Only eight are required by OSHA,

  • but a ninth may also be used to indicate environmental hazards.

  • The labels for hazardous chemicals must contain

  • one or more of the pictograms to illustrate the hazards of the chemical.

  • The exclamation mark pictogram, when shown by itself on a label,

  • is for chemicals that have toxicity levels that are harmful to humans but

  • are not usually fatal.

  • This includes chemicals that could be irritants to skin and eyes.

  • For example, pepper spray is a skin and eye irritant, and many soaps, detergents and

  • cleaning products like ammonia

  • and chlorine can be irritants. The exclamation mark pictogram will also be

  • used to show skin sensitizers,

  • acute toxicity, narcotic effects, respiratory tract

  • irritants. Also something that could be hazardous to the ozone layer.

  • However, this would not be mandatory under OSHA. While the chemical hazards

  • associated with the exclamation mark pictogram are a concern

  • and precautions need to be taken they are not as dangerous as the health effects

  • or hazards associated with the health hazard pictogram.

  • Health hazard means a chemical that can cause acute or chronic health effects

  • in exposed personnel. Chemicals like gasoline

  • benzene, acetone, and products like brake cleaner or anything containing volatile

  • organic compounds.

  • will have a health hazard pictogram on the label. When you see the health hazard

  • pictogram,

  • the product or chemical will fall under the list of potential health hazards

  • including the group mentioned earlier. The flame pictogram

  • indicates the product or chemical has flammable or self-reactive

  • characteristics

  • or other hazards as listed here.

  • This is the pictogram for all gases under pressure.

  • Don't be fooled by the picture of the cylinder because it covers much more.

  • This symbol includes all cylinders, propane tanks,

  • natural gas tanks, refrigerated liquids, and many other products in this category.

  • The chemical hazards associated with the corrosion pictogram

  • are skin corrosives and can cause permanent eye and skin damage.

  • This symbol, one that is seen commonly in the military, is one we don't see very

  • often in private industry,

  • unless of course you handle ammunition, explosives and so on.

  • Oxidizers are symbolized by an "O" with flames on top of the "O".

  • The skull and crossbones pictogram is for chemicals with acute toxicity effects

  • that are deadly and could lead to fatality if not handled correctly.

  • The dead fish and tree symbol signals environmental information.

  • This is non-mandatory under the OSHA standard as OSHA

  • does not regulate environmental hazards. As we said before the EPA regulates

  • environmental hazards

  • and the chemical manufacturer importer distributor would be required to comply

  • with EPA regulations

  • in addition to the OSHA labeling requirements. Here's an example

  • of the labels you may see under the new GHS rules.

  • As stated earlier in this presentation there is no standard format required for

  • the GHS label,

  • so the information may or may not be in the order presented here.

  • In fact you can anticipate that most labels will look different from each

  • other.

  • The thing you need to keep in mind is that even though labels will look

  • different,

  • the information they will be required to list on the label

  • is the same, and you should understand how to read and used the data presented.

  • Other items required to be on GHS labels include

  • precautionary statements. These are phrases that describe

  • recommended measures that should be taken to minimize

  • or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to hazardous chemical

  • or improper storage or handling. The precautionary statements would be the

  • same on the label

  • and on the safety data sheet for the product. The product identifier.

  • This is how the hazardous chemical is identified.

  • This can be but is not limited to the chemical name,

  • code number or batch number. The manufacturer, importer or distributor

  • can decide the appropriate product identifier. The same product identifier

  • must be both on the label and section one of the safety data sheet.

  • The supplier identification. The name, address and telephone number must be

  • provided

  • on the label. You may also see statements pertaining to any pertinent supplemental

  • information.