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  • Hello, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're looking at today is "verb" + "to". These are... You

  • could call them a group of verbs, and they always need to have "to" after them, plus

  • they always need to have an object. And the reason they need to have an object is because

  • they're transitive verbs. And that's a grammar word that means: this verb needs to have an

  • object, otherwise it's incorrect and it's not good English.

  • So we're looking at some of the verbs that I come across a lot that people get wrong.

  • So they're using... They're not using a "to" when they use that verb, and we're looking

  • at that. So, let's start and check how much you actually know with a couple of sentences.

  • So, our first sentence: "He phoned to me." What do you think about that one? Is that

  • right? Is that one wrong? Well, "phone" is not in this group of verbs. It's not a transitive

  • verb. We don't need "to" with that one. Now it's correct. "He phoned me."

  • What about this one? "I need to speak to him." How is that one? Is that one good English?

  • "I need to speak..." This one... This bit's okay. This is not "verb" + "to" here. This

  • is just the infinitive. When we have one verb, and then we're following it with another verb

  • in the present simple, that's why that "to" is there. That's not what we're talking about.

  • But after "speak", is it right here? Yes. In this example it's right. But I'm a very

  • naughty person, because I didn't put a full stop there. There should be a full stop there.

  • And let's look at this example: "Who am I speaking to?" Or sometimes: "Whom am I speaking

  • to?" What about this one? Is this one correct? Yeah, they're both correct. In speech, you'll

  • probably hear: "Who am I speaking to?" But formally, it would be: "Whom" with an "m"

  • written out, or sometimes said in speech that way.

  • So now, let's look at examples of "verb" + "to". These are all verbs that you should

  • be using with "to" after them. And what I usually observe is people using these verbs,

  • but without the "to", and it doesn't sound right then. So let's look at some example sentences.

  • "Speak to": "I don't speak to Sarah." And notice how the "to" doesn't sound like "to"

  • anymore. "I don't speak to Sarah." It just becomes a schwa. We don't... We don't say

  • it like the individual word itself.

  • Next example. "Talk to": "Talk to them for me." Don't know what accent that was; it just

  • kind of came out. Yeah, we talk to someone, we need an object.

  • "Listen to", this is very good advice for all people: "You should listen to me." It'd

  • be worth it. Trust me. Here's a gap. Nothing to learn here.

  • But now we've got "reply to": "I'm sure he'll reply to us." I almost put: "I'm sure he'll

  • reply to me", and then it felt a bit personal, so I put "us" there.

  • Next example, "write to", you always write to someone, but what I commonly hear people

  • not using "to" with this one. "I'll write to them a.s.a.p." Clever points for you if

  • you know what that means. That means "as soon as possible".

  • And "belong to": "Excuse me, does this belong to you?" You don't want to have someone come

  • up to you and ask you that at the train station. You get in trouble in England for that.

  • When we come back, we're going to look at some more examples of "verb" + "to".

  • Let's take a look at common errors with "verb" + "to". So with these... These verbs here,

  • even though they feel like or seem like they're similar to the verbs that we looked at before

  • because they're to do with communication, these ones don't take "to". So sometimes I'm

  • observing mistakes with these verbs, and that's what I want you to know.

  • So in our example sentences, these are all wrong. We need to make changes.

  • "I phone to him." No "to". We don't need "to".

  • "She called to me." No "to". You're starting to get it now - no "to".

  • "We emailed to them." No "to".

  • "They won't answer to us." Again, no "to".

  • "Will you ask to Sarah?" Again, no "to". We don't need "to" with these verbs.

  • What else is there to know? Well, if you... If you want to speak American English, know

  • that there's an exception. In British English, we can't say this. "He wrote me." Can't say

  • that; doesn't work in British English. But in colloquial/informal American English, it's

  • okay. And I just want to point out one that I'm hearing a lot: "They replied me." It's

  • not okay in British English and it's not okay in American English either. Maybe... Maybe

  • language is evolving a bit, and that's why people are saying it, but as it stands - not

  • okay. I hear this one quite a lot.

  • When we come back, we're taking a look at making questions with "verb" + "to".

  • One issue you should know about "verb" + "to" is that when we do questions, some people

  • don't like it. Some people don't like it to say: "Who is he speaking to?" For them, it's

  • really ugly. They don't like it. But there's a way to avoid it. If you want to avoid it,

  • you have to change the position of your sentence. So, "to" goes from the end to the beginning,

  • and importantly, then you need to change your pronoun. So "who" has to change to be "whom".

  • When this pronoun is in the object position of a sentence, that's when we add the "m".

  • Anyway, you don't really need to worry about the grammar, the why, because it's confusing

  • when I talk about object and subject for a lot of people who don't know about grammar.

  • All you need to do is just learn how to rearrange it. So you move "to" to the beginning, and

  • then it's always "To whom", and then you finish the rest of the words. And that way, you don't

  • have "to" at the end. In informal or neutral speech, this is really common. People will

  • say this, but it can be seen as inelegant or not very sophisticated if you write it.

  • I probably wouldn't write it myself. Yeah, maybe in chat or something, but not in...

  • Not in a proper letter or something.

  • Here's another. Here's another example. Let's see here: "Who did you write to?" Well, we

  • don't want to finish with "to", so we need to rearrange. Again, it comes to be "To whom",

  • that's easy; we just did the same. "To whom did you write?" And the verb, the main verb

  • goes at the end. The auxiliary verb is next to "whom", so we just change the order like that.

  • That's all I'm going to tell you about "verb" + "to". If you want to do more practice, please

  • go to the EngVid website. You can do a quiz, 10 questions in a quiz, and that way, you

  • know next time you need to use these verbs-"speak to", "talk to", all those verbs-you know that

  • you're saying them in the right way; you're using "to" when it's needed, and in those

  • exceptions that I mentioned to you, you know you're not using "to" where it doesn't belong.

  • If you like this lesson, I'd really appreciate it if you subscribe to the channel. And have

  • I mentioned everything? I think I mentioned everything. So that's all I'm going to talk about today.

  • Please come back and watch me again. And yeah, until next time. Bye.

Hello, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're looking at today is "verb" + "to". These are... You

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A2 UK TOEIC speak object write transitive british english

Grammar: How to use TO with transitive verbs

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    22 posted on 2015/05/27
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