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  • Since 1949, both Taiwan’s government, The Republic of China, and Mainland China’s government, The People’s Republic of China have claimed validity as the legitimate, and only, “China”.

  • So, what’s going on? Which is therealChina, and why do

  • the two countries hate each other?

  • A small disclaimer: We use these names to simplify the issue and are not siding with one or the other.

  • So, there used to be a single China under a single government.

  • But in 1949, during the Chinese Civil War, the Communist party forced the ruling government of China to flee.

  • They went to Taiwan, an ex-Japanese owned island separated from Mainland China by the Taiwan Strait.

  • The Communist Party instituted themselves as the new Chinese government.

  • And the two governments continued their war. The US, NATO, and most Western nations recognized the exiled Taiwanese government as legitimate.

  • Meanwhile, the Soviet Bloc and a few other countries recognized the new Communist government instead.

  • However, in 1979, the United States switched allegiances from the old Chinese government to the new Communist one in order to gain influence against the Soviet Union.

  • Mainland China then reached out to Taiwan with a “Three Linksattempt to normalized relations.

  • The three links weretransportation, commerce, and communication”.

  • In response, Taiwan implemented theirThree Noesforeign policy with Mainland China,

  • no contact, no compromise and no negotiation”.

  • But by 1987, Taiwan began allowing residents to visit Mainland China,

  • and both countries established institutions to deal with governmental relations.

  • Interestingly, since there has never been a formal declaration of peace from either side,

  • both countries are technically still at war today.

  • In 1992, the two governments came to a consensus, acknowledging that there was only one China,

  • and that each believed themselves to be it. Basically, they agreed to disagree,

  • which has let the two discuss negotiations without being bogged down on this primary issue.

  • The opposition to this consensus has been the movement to make Taiwan an independent country with it’s own, separate, national identity.

  • A third solution, calledOne Country, Two Systemswould establish Taiwan as one of China’s autonomous regions,

  • like Hong Kong and Macau.

  • However, in 2005, the Mainland Chinese passed a law to prevent Taiwan fromseceding,”

  • by authorizingnon-peacefulmeans to unify Taiwan back into Mainland China.

  • Since a number of groups in Taiwan want to establish independence, this law could cause a military showdown between the two countries, something Taiwan is eager to avoid.

  • At the same time, many in Taiwan are content with the status quo of mutually denying each other’s legitimacy.

  • Since then, a 2014 meeting between officials from both countries marked the first direct government contact since 1949.

  • From this meeting, and several high profile negotiations in the late 2000s,

  • the two countries have attempted to increase their economic, trade, healthcare, and travel relations.

  • However the two countries still seems far from reconciliation

  • due to the complicated, and sometimes paradoxical nature of their dispute.

  • Although each region has a unique story, China also has ongoing disputes with both Hong Kong and Tibet.

  • To learn more about these complex issues, check out the videos we made right over here.

  • And make sure you subscribe so you don’t miss a single upcoming video from TestTube!

  • Thanks everyone!

Since 1949, both Taiwan’s government, The Republic of China, and Mainland China’s government, The People’s Republic of China have claimed validity as the legitimate, and only, “China”.

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B2 H-INT US taiwan china mainland mainland china government communist

Why China And Taiwan Hate Each Other

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    阿多賓 posted on 2015/11/20
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