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  • Hi. I`m Carl Azuz. First up this Thursday on CNN STUDENT NEWS:

  • a tragic incident on the busiest railroad in North America,

  • Amtrak Northeast Corridor connects Washington, D.C. to Boston, Massachusetts.

  • On Tuesday, train number 188 was carrying 238 commuters

  • and five crew members from the capital to New York.

  • When it got near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the train derailed.

  • One witness said there`s a place

  • where the track curves around a warehouse,

  • and then it looked like the engine kept going straight, off the track,

  • followed by the cars it was pulling, seven of them came off the track.

  • At least seven people were killed.

  • The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

  • It says it's preliminary data shows the train

  • was traveling at a 100 miles per hour at the time it derailed.

  • That`s twice the speed limit on that section of the track.

  • Passengers were thrown from their seats against walls, doors, each other.

  • More than 200 people were injured,

  • several of them thanked first responders

  • who arrived within minutes to rescue victims.

  • Next: what`s being called "fear politics" in North Korea.

  • The communist country`s defense minister

  • was publicly executed within the past few weeks.

  • That`s according to a South Korean spy agency.

  • Hyon Yong Chol had been accused of treason.

  • He`d reportedly disobeyed the orders of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

  • South Korean officials say Hyon was not given a trial,

  • that he was killed two to three days after he was arrested.

  • North Korea`s dictator has been accused of executing

  • as many as 15 top officials this year.

  • A North Korean government official called that,

  • quote, "malicious slander",

  • but he did not deny that executions happen in North Korea

  • for crimes of treason and subversion, undermining the government.

  • A son grieves for his father, then executes his closest aides.

  • Within two years of taking power,

  • five of the seven men you see here with Kim Jong Un were either fired or killed.

  • According to this man,

  • the highest level North Korean official to defect in years,

  • that was just the beginning.

  • We`re hiding his identity and calling him "Mr. Park"

  • to protect friends and families still in Pyongyang.

  • In his first ever interview, he tells CNN,

  • Kim Jong Un`s cruelty is turning the elite against him.

  • "Within three months of taking power," he says,

  • "Kim Jong Un had ruthlessly executed seven of his father`s closest aides

  • and three generations of their families, including the children.

  • That was the beginning of his reign of terror."

  • Park worked closely with his father, former leader Kim Jong Il,

  • himself considered by much of the world as a brutal dictator.

  • But he says while the father imprisoned his enemies,

  • the son simply executes them, hundreds says Park.

  • "They may tremble in fear of him but their loyalty is fake.

  • They don`t consider him human.

  • His cruelty angers and shocks them."

  • One reason he believes Kim Jong Un will lose power within three years.

  • Another reason, he says, increasing questions of legitimacy.

  • Many believe Kim Jong Un`s mother was born in Japan,

  • an historical enemy of the Kim dynasty,

  • which obsesses over a pure legal bloodline.

  • While Kim has highlighted his physical similarities to his grandfather

  • and founder of North Korea, Kim Il Sung,

  • Park doubts they ever even met.

  • There`s not a single photo of Kim Jong Un and Kim Il Sung taken together, he says.

  • That is why people suspect Kim Il Sung didn`t even recognize him.

  • Park speaks of little electricity or running water outside the capital Pyongyang,

  • evidence of (INAUDIBLE) in North Korea in 2013,

  • but he also claims that the country is running out of money.

  • He says he worked closely with Kim Jong Un`s finances,

  • plans for Chinese style open market soon dropped

  • when it became clear Kim Jong Un`s reign could be in jeopardy.

  • Kim Jong Un has lost the confidence of the elite, says Park,

  • as he appears powerless to improve either the economy or foreign policy.

  • Instead he appears to be focusing on areas he thinks he cannot fail,

  • nuclear and military.Paul Hancocks, CNN, Seoul.

  • From the request on yesterday`s transcript page at CNNStudentNews.com,

  • here are three of the schools watching.

  • Roll Call. Archbishop Damiano School is online today.

  • Hello to everyone at Westville Grove, New Jersey.

  • The Lancers of Layton are next. That`s Layton, Utah,

  • and the students and teachers of Layton High School.

  • And in the Granite State,

  • hello to the Indians of Sanborn Regional Middle School there in Kingston, New Hampshire.

  • Officials say beach erosion

  • and flooding were some of the effects of Tropical Storm Ana.

  • It made landfall in South Carolina on Sunday.

  • Ana was a little early as far as the Atlantic hurricane season goes.

  • It doesn`t officially start until June 1st.

  • Well, one thing the U.S. hasn`t seen in recent hurricane seasons,

  • major hurricanes making landfall.

  • It may be hard to believe, but we have not had a major hurricane,

  • we`re talking about a category 3 or higher,

  • strike the U.S. in the past nine years.

  • That`s the longest hurricane drought ever.

  • The second longest drought we had was back in 1861 to `68.

  • That drought lasted eight years.

  • The American Geophysical Union did a study to try to

  • find out what causes these hurricane droughts

  • and how often we may have them.

  • It found that it`s likely to happen only once every 177 years.

  • But what`s more impressive is that

  • they couldn`t find any link to scientific evidence of why this happens.

  • It basically boils down to luck.

  • So, the last major hurricane to strike the U.S. is Hurricane Wilma.

  • That was back in 2005.

  • Now, it doesn`t mean we haven`t had destructive storm since.

  • Hurricane Sandy, we`ve also had Ike that impacted the Gulf Coast.

  • So, we`ve had some major damage from storms since 2005.

  • But we haven`t had any with the category 3 or higher intensity.

  • Always remember that the hurricane drought can end at any time.

  • That`s why it`s always important to be prepared.

  • Time for the shoutout.

  • What is measured in kilojoules? If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Isn`t it water depth, atmospheric pressure, food energy, or buoyancy?

  • You got three seconds. Go!

  • The energy we get from what we eat and drink is measured in kilojoules.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your shoutout.

  • Energy drinks can have high levels of kilojoules,

  • and some doctors are warning people to put them down.

  • A study in the "Journal of Pediatrics"

  • found their most common ingredients include caffeine, a stimulant, guarana,

  • a stimulant, ginseng, a root that`s believed to be stimulating, and lots of sugar.

  • Often, the amounts of caffeine that energy drinks say

  • they have are inaccurate and they`re not regulated

  • by the Food and Drug Administration.

  • So, how can you get a natural boost?

  • This may surprise you,

  • but the energy drink industry is now a $10 billion a year industry.

  • Think about that, we didn`t even have energy drinks just a couple of decades ago.

  • When you think about energy drinks,

  • you`re thinking about lots of different things.

  • Obviously, a lot of caffeine, but also stimulants,

  • things that are designed to actually stimulate the body`s metabolism,

  • would stimulate the body overall.

  • They can lead to all sorts of different things.

  • They can lead to increased heart rate, increased blood pressure,

  • restlessness, anxiety, insomnia.

  • There are ways to get really good energy and have that energy last a long time.

  • Think about a couple of things like lean protein

  • and smart carbohydrates, almonds, cheese, Greek yogurt.

  • Both those things can make you more productive and could help you live to 100.

  • Polo is known as the sport of kings.

  • First played thousands of years ago in Persia, now Iran,

  • it became a popular sport for nobility -- hence kings.

  • In contrast, the bicycle, as we know it, didn`t appear until the 1800s.

  • Not everyone has a chance to play a game on horseback,

  • but most everyone has the chance to ride a bicycle.

  • Put them together and what do you have?

  • Get a feel of how the pros do it by observing a real game

  • and hearing it called by the man they call "Machine".

  • All right, guys. Three, two, one, polo! This is the joust.

  • That`s the joust. It takes one crack (INAUDIBLE).

  • (INAUDIBLE) use the cross crandle (ph) there to hit over.

  • The what? Ah, the cross crandle (ph), of course,

  • in which a player shoots on a goal over their steering arm.

  • And here`s the thing they call -- falling down.

  • And someone`s scoring a goal.

  • Between never putting your foot down

  • and steering with one hand while swinging

  • a stick with the other at a moving target,

  • I now understand how hard it is to play the sport.

  • Polo and biking are polar opposites,

  • but there`s no reason they should get ride of the idea.

  • What about the sport is not to bike

  • and certainly not as polarizing as our puns,

  • even though all of the polo players could easily get tired,

  • and they certainly miss their Marco?

  • I`m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

Hi. I`m Carl Azuz. First up this Thursday on CNN STUDENT NEWS:

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