Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • >>Thank you very much for coming along this evening to this event on The Long Legacy:

  • London 2062. UCL calls itself, or names itself, "London's global university". That might have

  • originally been a name coined to irritate the other University of London, however, I

  • think time has shown that [it] has a degree of resonance. And as a global university,

  • we have asked ourselves the question, what is the role of a leading university in the

  • world, and we feel that it's important that not only do we carry out world class research,

  • but that we actually integrate and cross tension the expertise we have in different disciplines

  • to try to find solutions to globally significant problems. So, as Vice-Provost for research,

  • my responsibility is to try to encourage colleagues to cross the traditional divide of different

  • disciplines to come up with solutions or possible solutions to major problems. And as a result,

  • what we've done at UCL is to create and define four grand challenges which focus on major

  • societal issues which the world faces. The first of these grand challenges is global

  • health: why is it that citizens of sub-saharan African countries are actually dying from

  • diseases that can be readily treated here at UCH or elsewhere? The second of our grand

  • challenges is sustainable cities, and that's born some of the activity that we'll talk

  • about tonight. Our third grand challenge is intercultural interaction, and our fourth

  • grand challenge is human wellbeing. Now these grand challenges are being evolved over the

  • last couple of years and continue to do so but tonight we are focusing on the cities

  • problem, and in the sustainable cities equation and studies that we've been carrying out at

  • UCL focused on a variety of things, for instance, recently in May we published a commission

  • with the Lancet on 'healthy cities' -- what is it that one has to do to ensure that cities

  • around the world are healthy places and engender healthy lives for their citizens? But tonight

  • we focus on the analysis of colleagues at UCL and outside UCL that have been working

  • in the last year or so on aspects related to London and the future of London. And we

  • titled that project 'London 2062', a fifty-year view forward as to what are the challenges,

  • what are the issues that this wonderful metropolitan city face, and how is it that we could start

  • thinking now in a way that will avoid and alleviate some of the challenges and the negatives

  • which could occur, and obviously, what is it that we need to do to conserve the positive

  • features of London. And I think in the summer, we've all seen some of the fabulous things

  • that bring London to life and what makes London a special place, and I think it's really exciting

  • to talk about tonight how it is we can capture, grow that and actually have this long legacy

  • fifty years after the Olympics. So I'm delighted this evening that we have a number of colleagues

  • who have been involved with the thinking and the development of this analysis, and we'll

  • be hearing from three of them this evening. Later on in the year, or maybe at the beginning

  • of 2013, we will be publishing a book which captures the ideas of a number of other colleagues

  • and which will be launching a little bit later on there. But I'd like to start this evening,

  • therefore, by asking my three colleagues to come and give some of their thoughts about

  • some of the issues, and after they've spoken, we'll be able to have a dialogue and discussion

  • with questions from the audience. So to start this evening, I'd like to introduce to you

  • Ben Harrison, who is the Director of Future of London, and has been involved in the discussions

  • throughout the last year or so, and is going to give us a synoptic overview of some of

  • the thinking which is being developed. So, Ben, can I pass it over to you? >>[Applause]

  • >>[Harrison] Can I just start by asking if you can all hear me all right? Is the mic

  • okay? It sounds like it is. Excellent. Thank you very much David and good evening ladies

  • and gentlemen. Before I start with what I have prepared to say tonight, I just also

  • want to thank Sarah Bell, Mark Tudor Jones, James Paskins and Ian Scott from UCL for offering

  • the invitation to Future of London to come and get involved in this programme of work.

  • It's been a fantastically interesting one and we specifically were involved in running

  • a series of seminars at the start of this year looking at a number of different related

  • disciplines and policy areas and I'm going to say a bit more about that in a moment.

  • Before I do that, though, I just want to take the opportunity to give a bit of an introduction

  • to Future of London. We're a relatively young organisation and I'm conscious that our involvement

  • in this year may very well be the first time that you come across us as an organisation.

  • So, I'll do a brief run through of that, and then following that, I will give a brief overview,

  • as David mentioned, of some of the areas where we were able to find that consensus from our

  • events and the contributions that were made within them and then some key points of difference

  • going forward about London's future over the next 50 years. So, to begin, what is Future

  • of London? Well, as our strapline says, we're an independent, not for profit, policy network

  • focused on the big challenges facing regeneration, housing and development practitioners in London.

  • What does that mean specifically? Well, we are a membership organisation bringing together

  • London boroughs, registered providers and housing associations, the GLA, TFL and overall

  • we have three main programs of activity. The first is focused on developing the next generation

  • of regeneration leaders in London. We run a training and development program called

  • The Future London Leaders and that identifies individuals whom across our membership who

  • tend to be between five an seven years in their career and provides a range of development

  • and networking opportunities for them. We're into the fourth round of that program. It's

  • been hugely successful and is a very popular part of our program, and we're about to launch

  • the next round next month. We also offer our members various forums to share best practice

  • and innovative thinking across the London Practitioner Network. We're very conscious

  • that despite being a global city, actually a lot of what goes on in London can be surprisingly

  • parochial and building relationships across borough boundaries and between organisations

  • is something which we believe is absolutely vital if we're going to learn the lessons

  • from the various programs of regeneration underway across the capital. And finally,

  • we also produce various outputs from a research and policy point of view but really with a

  • specific focus on pieces of work that will be of practical assistance and are really

  • focused on delivery. Hopefully you've seen a few copies of reports that we've launched

  • over the past 12 months this evening. They've tended to focus on the implementation of various

  • pieces of government legislation, most notably the green deal, and how that can work in London,

  • and we've just published a report recently on flows of overseas investment into the London

  • property market, what that's doing to house prices and what it means going forward for

  • housing policy. So, to deliver this work we engage in a range of partnerships, working

  • with a diverse groups of organisations from UCL to the Joseph Rowntree Organisation, major

  • house builders and big city law firms to deliver a vibrant program as I say with a number of

  • different component parts. Our membership for 2012 is here. We're just about finalised

  • that for 2013, and if you are interested in getting involved in our network, then please

  • do visit our website, it's futureoflondon.org.uk. And there's various different ways that you

  • can become individually involved or as an organisation. So, that's the mini sales pitch

  • over. Turning to think about London 2062 and the seminar series that we collaborated with

  • Sarah, Mark and colleagues on in the spring of this year. The seminar series itself consisted

  • of four sessions. We welcomed a total of over 100 participants, drawn both from the academic

  • community but also from our practitioner network. Each was designed to explore a specific topic,

  • energy housing, transport and the economy, looking ahead over a 50 year timeline, and

  • alongside these events you'll have no doubt seen that colleagues at UCL and ourselves

  • have published a range of think pieces, articles and essays and as David has mentioned there

  • is a more substantial output coming next year. In terms of the sessions themselves and what

  • we -- the themes that emerged from them were, clearly we set our contributors a very large

  • and probably unfair challenge, to conceive of what London is going to be like over a

  • 50 year timeline. It's not a usual task that you present to people that you're inviting

  • to come and speak at an event. And I guess perhaps reflecting the pre-Olympic double

  • dip recession gloom that pervaded over London at that time, it's fair to say that we heard

  • some fairly terrifying projections of what London's going to like in 50 years time: overcrowded

  • and bursting at the seams, subject to the mal-effect of large temperature increases

  • and rising sea levels as a result of global climate change, more unequal than ever and

  • with an economy unable to compete with rising global megacities in the east. Of course,

  • others were simply holding out the hope that the hoverboards that we were promised by the

  • year 2000 would have materialised by then. By and large, it was a pessimistic set of

  • contributions that we received from a number of individuals. Having said that, though,

  • there were definite areas of consensus and disagreement both between and within the practitioner

  • and academic groups that we talked to and who presented to us. And I'd just now like

  • to highlight a few of these, perhaps to inform some of the discussion that we're going to

  • have later on in the evening. So, first of all, to look at where there was a degree of

  • consensus amongst our contributors. When taking into account a rather unscientific show of

  • hands in the seminar looking at specifically the economy, but also taken with the general

  • nature and tone of contributions throughout the series, it seemed pretty clear that most

  • people are of the view that London will continue to be an unequal place and actually will become

  • more unequal over the next 50 years as things stand. Many were concerned about a gap between

  • those at the bottom and the top of the income scales continuing to increase, particularly

  • a disparity between inner and outer London also becoming wider. Secondly, when considering

  • energy policy, all four of our sector specialists highlighted the Danish model of decentralised

  • energy as a key example that London should look to follow in the years ahead, and with

  • colleagues both within the GLI and in our borough members already pursuing schemes in

  • this regard, there was certainly some degree of optimism that progress in this area will

  • be possible and that this will be a very important component part of London meeting its carbon

  • reduction commitment by 2062. Third, the successful delivery of Crossrail is clearly vital to

  • the development of London. But we should also be actively considering what comes next in

  • terms of major investment in London's transport, and there was a sense that perhaps more thought

  • needs to be given to the period between 2020 and 2040 in terms of what that investment's

  • going to look like and how transport can meet the needs of a changing London economy over

  • that time. And fourth and finally, it was widely recognised that tough decisions are

  • going to be needed to improve London's energy efficiency and reduce its carbon output of

  • its built environment. Specific policy initiatives like the green deal are thought to be good

  • places to start but clearly there are significant financial and delivery hurdles that need to

  • be cleared if London is to meet, if these schemes are to be widely taken up and their

  • benefits felt across London, and given that the proportion of the built environment that

  • is still goign to be in use in London in 50 years time is so high, it really does need

  • to be a major priority for London in the years ahead. And then turning to some of the areas

  • where there was more disagreement or uncertainty around where London will be in the next 50

  • years: much discussion was had over whether we need a new economic model in light of the

  • recent financial crisis and whether the old way of assessing and looking at London's economy

  • was somehow no longer fit for purpose. On the other hand, many of our contributors that

  • actually to throw the baby out with the bathwater and not play to London's existing strengths

  • would be a huge mistake, and I think finding a resolution within those two points of view

  • was probably beyond the two hours that we had to debate it, but it's something which

  • is going to be developing over the coming years, and really, I think, a key point of

  • focus for Future of London going forward is thinking well, if we are serious about developing

  • a more poli-centric London economy with a diverse set of sectors stretching beyond financial

  • services by taking advantage of the opportunities of the digital economy, what does that really

  • look like, and what as practitioners do we need to do to achieve it? Secondly, a clear

  • area of uncertainty was around what if any new powers London should seek from central

  • government? Clearly we have in power at the moment a government that is serious about

  • devolving power to a local area since the events were held, we've obviously seen city

  • deals and a significant devolution of power to Leeds and Manchester and Newcastle and

  • the local deals it's true did bring additional powers to the mayorality in London and increased

  • the scope of mayoral involvement in housing development and other areas. But I think a

  • key question for the next two to three years will really be well, should London be looking

  • for a new settlement to deliver growth in the period ahead, and is it right that London,

  • for instance, takes control fully of the business rate, which has been long on the agenda or

  • other pot of money that could potentially be used to boost investment in the capital,

  • not without controversy, not without extremely complicated areas, but nevertheless, with

  • Boris Johnson probably never being more powerful than he is right now, you would imagine right

  • now that the scope for him to go back to David Cameron and demand a better settlement for

  • London will be one to look out for. Thirdly, and perhaps most controversially of all, the

  • future of aviation policy in London was a big feature of our transport session. Do we

  • expand our existing airport transport incrementally, build a new airport, essentially for Europe

  • in the Thames Estuary, or actually do nothing and take the view that London's priorities

  • should lie elsewhere and that the costs of increasing air travel in London to perhaps

  • some of our other aims in the capital would be too great and therefore not worth doing.

  • Clearly, it's a hot topic politically, so hot in fact that it's been well and truly

  • kicked into the lawn grass for this parliament with none of the major parties that keen to

  • engage with it, nevertheless, the issue's going to continue to dominate public debate

  • and it's not an issue that can be put off forever and whichever way it goes, it's going

  • to have major implications for the future direction of development in the capital, geographically,

  • environmentally and socially. And fourth and finally, and extremely importantly, how can

  • London deliver the number and types of new homes it requires to meet the needs of a population

  • that's projected to grow significantly over the decades ahead, while also ensuring that

  • access to this housing is widened. There is consensus across the practitioner network

  • in London that some of the old models for delivering housing and in particular, affordable

  • housing, are now dead in the water, we are very unlikely to see a return to the levels

  • of public subsidy for affordable housing in London that we've seen prior to 2010 and therefore

  • a new model of investment is required. Quite what that's going to look like is not clear

  • right now, but we have probably a two year window before 2015 to really think about what

  • that should look like for London and be proactive about it, so I think that's going to be a

  • key priority in the years ahead, we'll have very long lasting impacts looking forward

  • to 2062. So, those are some themes and questions emerging form the 2062 event series, and I

  • hope it can inform and spark some discussion later on this evening. They're by no means

  • comprehensive, but each will have a bearing on the kind of city we inhabit over the coming

  • decades. Future of London will certainly be interrogating these issues in more detail

  • over the coming months, and in doing so, we look forward to continuing our partnership

  • with UCL and as I mentioned earlier in the evening, if you do want to know more about

  • Future of London or become actively engaged in some of our projects or programmes, please

  • do look at the website or catch myself later on this evening and I look forward to answering

  • your questions as and when we move to that part. I'll hand over to Ben now. >>So, there

  • we have a synoptic quick whistle stop tour through some of the topics that have been

  • discussed. Next, we're going to hear from Ben Campkin who is Senior Lecturer in the

  • Bartlett School here at UCL and Director of the UCL Urban Laboratory, so some aspects

  • of the urban regeneration challenges, focusing now on a little specific window following

  • up that more general oversight. So, Ben, over to you.

  • >>[Campkin] That was already set up, I just wanted to slow us down. Thank you very much

  • and thank you for inviting me to speak this evening and to be part of the London 2062

  • project. I think it's been a really excellent initiative so thanks to the colleagues for

  • organising it, both in UCL and in Future of London. We've had some really stimulating

  • conversations, and I think it's really important to have these conversations between academic

  • researchers and practitioners and policy-makers around these really important questions. I've

  • been involved with two London 2062 events. I did two different talks. And I seem to have

  • spent both of them trying to avoid talking about the long distance future in different

  • ways, trying to avoid this idea of future-gazing, but what I wanted to do today was really think

  • through some of the ideas that came out of the London 2062 housing workshop that I participated

  • in in relation -- and not all of those ideas were specifically about housing, some of them

  • were about wider regeneration issues, and to think about those in relation to the Olympic

  • legacy. I should say also that this comes partly out of my own research interest in

  • regeneration and the history of regeneration. Also the sorts