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  • With two days left in March,

  • we`re glad you`re taking 10 minutes to watch CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • My name is Carl Azuz.

  • First up in our commercial-free coverage,

  • votes are being counted in the African nation of Nigeria.

  • Results could come out Tuesday from the country`s most tightly contested election since democracy was reestablished there in 1999.

  • Analysts say turnout was high, in the tens of millions.

  • And that`s despite the fact that the election commission`s Web site was hacked,

  • despite some problems with ballot paper and digital voting card readers and despite attacks by the Boko Haram terrorist group.

  • It`s based in Northern Nigeria.

  • It wants a strict form of Islamic law in the country.

  • It killed at least 11 people at polling stations,

  • so security was a major concern in these elections, but not the only one.

  • With nearly 180 million people, Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa,

  • and one of the world`s largest mega democracies.

  • I am CNN journalist Stephanie Busari

  • and I was born and raised in Nigeria.

  • The Nigeria I remember was a very peaceful country with different faiths mixing together and interacting peacefully.

  • But that -- that has changed significantly in recent times.

  • The major issue for most Nigerians is security.

  • In the past five years, Boko Haram, the terrorist group, has killed and kidnapped thousands of Nigerians.

  • They really came to the world`s attention in April last year, when they kidnapped nearly 300 schoolgirls.

  • Past elections has been marred by allegations of rigging and election violence.

  • The economy is also crucial.

  • Last year, Nigeria overtook South Africa to become the largest economy in Africa.

  • But many complain that the country`s vast oil wealth does not trickle down to the average Nigerian on the street.

  • Around 70 percent of Nigerians live below the poverty line.

  • Who are the candidates in this election?

  • The incumbent is Goodluck Jonathan.

  • And he was elected in 2011 on a massive wave of popularity.

  • He was almost seen as a kind of Obama-type change figure.

  • But Nigerians are disappointed, because many say he has simply failed to deliver on the promises that he made.

  • His main opponent is a retired general called Muhammadu Buhari.

  • He was a former ruler of Nigeria.

  • He ruled briefly following a military coup.

  • And he`s also run unsuccessfully in the last three elections.

  • Roll Call -- we`re visiting coastal states today,

  • but they don`t all border an ocean.

  • For example, take Pennsylvania.

  • It has a tiny bit of coastline along Lake Erie.

  • The Vanguard School in the borough of Malvern is online in The Keystone State.

  • On the Pacific Coast, California is on the Roll.

  • La Habra in Southern California is home to La Habra High School and The Highlanders.

  • And Wisconsin borders Lake Michigan and Lake Superior.

  • Today`s school is right near Lake Winneconne, though,

  • The Wolves of Winneconne High School are watching.

  • The Obama administration is looking to nearly double the amount of government money used to fight super bugs.

  • These are bacterial infections that can`t easily be killed by traditional antibiotics.

  • Medical researchers say super bugs sicken two million people in the U.S. each year and kill 23,000 people.

  • The president`s budget would spent $1.2 billion over five years.

  • It aims to eliminate antibiotic use in animals raised for food.

  • It aims to improve testing, reporting and tracking super bugs in people.

  • And it would increase research for new antibiotics and vaccines.

  • Also, the plan wants to cut in half the inappropriate antibiotic use in doctors` offices and hospitals.

  • But some doctors say that`s vague,

  • asking who decides what kind of antibiotic use is inappropriate?

  • The plan also has to be approved by Congress, which may not happen.

  • From the tower marking less than 15 seconds, the engines igniting, ramping up, and lift-off.

  • A year in space starts now.

  • Kelly, Kornienko and Padalka on their way toward the International Space Station.

  • OK, you heard that right, a year in space, almost. It`s 342 days.

  • But it would set a new record for the longest time any American has spent in weightlessness.

  • Four Russian cosmonauts have done it before.

  • Scott Kelly blasted off on Friday for the International Space Station.

  • While he`s there, he won`t just be conducting science experiments, he`ll be one of them.

  • Scott Kelly is on a mission to become the first American to spend an entire year on the International Space Station.

  • That`s nearly twice as long as any other American has ever stayed in space.

  • Kelly will spend 12 months orbiting the Earth.

  • And besides just being away from his family for a year,

  • Kelly will also be away from something we all take for granted, gravity.

  • And that will have a profound impact on his body.

  • Kelly will take part in a bunch of studies to find out how low gravity impacts his eyes, his heart, his bones, even his brain.

  • About a third of American astronauts have developed vision problems.

  • It may be because without gravity,

  • bodily fluids float up to their heads,

  • causing structural changes in their eyes.

  • But that theory has never been fully tested.

  • NASA scientists have documented cardiac arrhythmias and decreases in heart function in space flight.

  • Spend a long time off the planet and your bones thin.

  • This puts astronauts at a greater risk for broken bones and osteoporosis.

  • How does being confined on a space station for long periods of time affect your thoughts and your behavior?

  • NASA says knowing this is crucial if we`re ever going to Mars or deep space.

  • But how will we know if being in space is the cause of Kelly`s body changes?

  • NASA has the perfect specimen to compare him to -- his twin brother, retired astronaut, Mark Kelly.

  • Mark Kelly has volunteered for NASA`s twins study, to see how the identical twins change over a year in very different environments.

  • So Mark will be here on Earth, getting poked and prodded by researchers while Scott makes history in orbit.

  • Kelly won`t be alone on the Space Station.

  • A Russian cosmonaut also is taking part in the one year mission.

  • And several other crew members will rotate in and out during Kelly`s stay.

  • The word "base" has a lot of different meanings,

  • even when you drop it down to the category of music.

  • In bands, some of you might play the double bass, some the bass guitar.

  • In chorus, someone who sings low may be a bass

  • and those who just listen to music like the boom of the lower range.

  • But could there ever be use for a sub woofer on your stovetop?

  • You know, engineering is all about finding a way to make the impossible possible.

  • So that`s what we did.

  • I see this device being applied to a lot of things.

  • First off, I think in the kitchen, it could be on top of a stovetop.

  • But eventually, I`d like to see this applied to maybe swarm robotics, where there would be attached to a drone

  • and that would be applied to forest fires or even building fires.

  • So is that one of the best ideas that would make good baseness sense on a regular basis

  • or are these guys way off base?

  • Should they do an about bass and re-bass the bass and base it on something less debasable?

  • It certainly sounds like it will make waves.

  • I`m Carl Azuz.

  • CNN STUDENT NEWS returns tomorrow, same time, same bass.

With two days left in March,

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March 30, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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