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  • [ Background Music ]

  • >> Stanford University.

  • [ Pause ]

  • [ Discussion ]

  • [ Pause ]

  • [ Laughter ]

  • >> Welcome to the Stanford Memorial Church

  • for our third annual Harry's Last Lecture

  • on a Meaningful Life.

  • I'm Scotty McLennan the Dean for Religious Life and I welcome you

  • on behalf of all members of the Office for Religious Life.

  • We're honored and thrilled that His Holiness,

  • the Dalai Lama is our third Rathbun visiting fellow

  • following Secretary George Shultz in 2009

  • and Justice Sandra Day O'Connor in 2008.

  • His Holiness has actually spoken here

  • in the Memorial Church twice over the last 15 years,

  • and we're grateful to have him back here again today.

  • The Harry and Emilia Rathbun Fund for Exploring What Leads

  • to a Meaningful Life was made possible

  • by an endowment established in 2006 by the Foundation

  • for Global Community which is directed

  • by their son, Richard Rathbun.

  • Its purpose is to help Stanford students engage

  • in self-reflection and moral inquiry and exploration

  • of life's purpose especially in commitment to the common good.

  • Its centerpiece is a visiting fellow program

  • which brings notable, wise,

  • and experienced people to campus each year.

  • After receiving his undergraduate

  • and master's degrees in engineering,

  • Harry Rathbun worked in government

  • and private industry positions developing

  • and manufacturing telegraph and radio transmitters.

  • He became the Vice President

  • of the Colin B. Kennedy Radio Company before returning

  • to Stanford to earn his law degree.

  • As a beloved law professor here then, from 1929 until 1959,

  • he also became known university-wide

  • for setting aside his final course lecture in law to talk

  • about the kinds of values and commitments

  • that would lead students to a meaningful life as a whole.

  • Emilia and Harry were also generous

  • in opening their home weekly to students to discuss ethics,

  • psychology, and religion.

  • They cofounded the Sequoia Seminar here in the Bay Area

  • which was later known as Creative Initiative

  • and then Beyond War, and finally,

  • the Foundation for Global Community.

  • Many board members and participants in the foundation

  • and its predecessor organizations are here this

  • afternoon, and I especially want to greet you and thank you.

  • The Office for Religious Life is committed in its mission

  • to guide, nurture, and enhance spiritual, religious,

  • and ethical life university-wide

  • at Stanford including engaging ourselves

  • in the sacred duty to repair the world.

  • My Associate Dean colleagues, Rabbi Patricia Karlin-Neumann

  • and the Reverent Joanne Sanders direct programs with titles like

  • "What Matters to Me and Why", "Sports and Spirituality",

  • and the "Fellows for Religious Encounter"

  • which are all supported by Rathbun funding.

  • Three of us work with the talented

  • and committed staff we're very grateful in particular

  • to NaSun Cho, the Rathbun Program Manager who's been

  • responsible for planning and organizing this lecture today.

  • I also want to acknowledge development officer Maura

  • McGinnity who's worked with the Foundation from the start

  • to conceptualize this program

  • and stayed helpfully involved every step of the way.

  • So, it's now my pleasure to introduce Richard Rathbun,

  • President of the Foundation of Global Community--

  • for Global Community, who will make the formal introduction

  • of our visiting fellow, the Dalai Lama.

  • Richard is a social visionary who's put his commitments

  • into practice from his early days in the Peace Corps

  • to the groundbreaking work that he did

  • in leading the Beyond War Organization that's now become

  • the Foundation for Global Community.

  • And he's traveled extensively in more than 50 countries

  • and has one of the most genuinely global perspectives

  • I've ever known, so with the utmost respect and appreciation

  • that I now introduce Richard Rathbun.

  • [ Applause ]

  • >> Thank you, Dean McLennan.

  • It's a rare opportunity we have today to gather together

  • in this awesome place - the place that helps us to connect

  • with some of the most expansive and important ideas

  • that we may ever encounter.

  • It's more than symbolic

  • that this space occupies the very center of the university.

  • Our speaker this afternoon hardly needs an introduction,

  • so I will be very brief.

  • The typical introduction might begin this way.

  • His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama has traveled to more

  • than 62 countries spanning six continents.

  • He's met with countless political, religious,

  • and scientific world leaders.

  • In addition to the Nobel Peace Prize,

  • he has received numerous awards, honorary doctorates,

  • and prizes in recognition of his message of peace, nonviolence,

  • inter-religious understanding,

  • universal responsibility, and compassion.

  • He's authored more than 72 books.

  • Those are among his worldly accomplishments.

  • But it is his inner journey

  • that distinguishes him from all others.

  • There's probably no one in today's world more able to speak

  • about the meaning and purpose of life than His Holiness,

  • Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama.

  • His life represents an extraordinary personal journey

  • of rigorous exploration coupled

  • with a highly disciplined expression

  • of the fundamental principles that can lead to pain

  • and suffering or, on the other hand, to meaning and happiness.

  • His Holiness takes his rightful place in an extended lineage

  • that is perhaps as old as our species.

  • The lineage engaged in the search for answers

  • to the most profound questions we can ask both of ourselves

  • and of our societies to which we belong.

  • So I encourage us all to listen carefully.

  • The message we are about to hear today may contain some

  • of the most important information we will ever hear,

  • that's one of those little warning lights.

  • Labels that you see on the gas pumps.

  • The message we are about to hear today may contain some

  • of the most important information we will ever hear.

  • So please join me in giving a warm Stanford welcome to a man

  • who describes himself as a simple Buddhist monk,

  • His Holiness, Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama.

  • [ Applause ]

  • >> Usually I prefer to speak from there,

  • but today, a little time.

  • So I'll-- I want to seek your permission

  • to speak from here, okay.

  • [Laughter] And from here, no difficulties to see your face.

  • Sometimes to see little bit low, then I'd prefer to stand,

  • but here, not need to stand.

  • So, indeed I'm very happy, great honor to speak,

  • share some of my experience with you.

  • Basically, we are same although I come from Tibet.

  • In the past, outside world consider mysterious land.

  • >> And of course the Tibet, land of snow, a bit isolated.

  • And Tibetan themselves also easily prefer being

  • in isolation.

  • I think that I feel foolish.

  • [Laughter] So, in any way, I come from that area-- that land.

  • You are these very modernized nations.

  • Not only human level, fundamental level we are same.

  • I think I often received feeling

  • that modernity maybe means external sort of structure,

  • buildings and more emissions, more cars.

  • But we here, user of these modern things,

  • still we are I think same human being.

  • Last, at least several thousand years, we still the same.

  • Our emotions, same.

  • Our intelligence, the real sort of the--

  • the seat of intelligence, same.

  • So long the size of the brain remain same, these are same.

  • And then, so therefore, my only experience also maybe some--

  • offer some help to you and particularly experience

  • from one older people to younger people sometimes maybe useful.

  • So, now here the thing, meaningful life.

  • Actually, of course the explanation

  • of meaningful life may be the different explanation due

  • to different philosophical teaching.

  • For example, according to theistic religion,

  • theistic faith may have some different explanation.

  • And non-theistic and other non-theistic sort

  • of religion faith also may have some difference of explanation.

  • But I always see talking on the level

  • of human being not as religious faith.

  • So a meaningful life on that level

  • in the sense of meaningful life.

  • Firstly, you yourself achieve happy days and nights,

  • weeks and months, years.

  • Then second-- secondly, we are social element.

  • Individuals so sort of the happy life much depend on the rest

  • of the community because we are one of them.

  • If we really remain-- when I was young, I saw one--

  • thousand or something--

  • >> Thousand.

  • >> Thousand or something remain very smooth area

  • and occasionally shouting.

  • [Inaudible] like that, then okay,

  • only think oneself not necessarily to develop sense

  • of concern of other, it was you yourself is

  • completely independent.

  • Your survival depend on some fruits,

  • some wild fruits, that's all.

  • But we are not that way.

  • Our daily existence, our food, our shelter, our clothes,

  • all is they come from other fellow, other's effort.

  • Then one very important sort of element

  • for happy life is good friend

  • to whom you share your difficulties, your joyfulness.

  • Friendship on the basis of genuine affection.

  • Friendship, genuine friend will not bring by money alone

  • or by those that's we may call friend

  • who showing you some smile, some nice word, but actually

  • such friend are friend of money or friend of power,

  • not friend of being, the person.

  • So genuine friendship comes from heart,

  • genuine trust measure respect.

  • So genuine trust and respect come if you treat them honestly,

  • truthfully, sincerely.

  • And with that, no hypocrisy, no telling lie.

  • Transparent.

  • These are the basis of foundation of trust.

  • So this very much a little bit your most sense of concern

  • of other's well-being.

  • That automatically brings respect and trust.

  • Other hand, extreme self-centered attitude,

  • they often brings suspicion, distrust, hypocrisy.

  • So therefore, to both one's own happy life,

  • you need self confidence.

  • Compassion brings self confidence.

  • More self confidence, more inner strength, less fear.

  • Less fear, your mild will be more calm.

  • That also immense benefit to body health, physical health.

  • So sometime back, some sort of discussion about health

  • with scientist or concerned scientist is indeed healthy

  • mind, healthy body.

  • Without sort of big attention in order to have healthy mind,

  • just healthy body is difficult.

  • So we must bring equally attention about healthy mind.

  • So for individual's happiness, successful life, healthy mind,

  • healthy body, important.

  • And second level, as a social element is that we have

  • to create more compassion in the society,

  • compassion in the family.

  • There also key factor is wholeheartedness, honest.

  • So that be respective both a believer or nonbeliever.

  • So long we are human being, so long we are part

  • of the humanity, these are fundamental value

  • that I believe.

  • So, in order to carry meaningful life, money,

  • power, these are secondary.

  • You know what in order to be--

  • in order to carry meaningful life, money, better facility.

  • >> These are important but not ultimate source, factor.

  • Ultimate factor is mind, more compassionate mind.

  • So then that's usually I describe secularly of approach

  • to increase this inner value which itself secularities mainly

  • by logical factor of these things.

  • Then alas a thousand years, I think 4 to 5 thousand years,

  • the faith eventually developed on this planet.

  • So all these different faith, the essential message,

  • essential teaching is same - love, compassion,

  • with that forgiveness, tolerance, and