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  • Man, that car goes so fast. I'd like one, but, you know, because I don't have the money right now.

  • Hi. James, from EngVid. I'm looking at some serious automobiles.

  • They are so cool, and they go so fast it's incredible, you know? $50,000 -- I thought so. It's more

  • money than that. Anyway. Today, we're going to do a lesson on "because" and "so".

  • The reason why is because a lot of students get confused with -- and I love the word "confused",

  • so let's change that to a lot of students don't understand the difference between when to use "so" or "because", so they generally

  • ....I'm using "so" again -- use "because". It's easier.

  • But today, we're going to learn the difference so you can start using it in your language like a native speaker, okay?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • "He said I'm fat, so I hit him. Blam!" "I hit him because he said I was fat. Blam!"

  • What's the difference? "Mr. E punched me twice." Right? It hurt. It's still hurting. All right?

  • Do you know the difference between "so" and "because"? I can speak English. Because you're reading the sentence,

  • it seems to be the same thing. I said "fat"; I got hit. Right? Right.

  • But how do we know the difference, and what is the difference? Let's go to the board and look at the grammar to start with.

  • And then afterwards, we'll show examples of how it's different.

  • All right? So you can start using it right away.

  • First of all, I'm going to start with "because". It's easy. You'll notice a little here -- well,

  • a little here and a lot there. "Because." It's a reason. It's why. So when you use "because",somebody usually says to you why.

  • And then, you say "because". "I am late." "Why?" "Because the train was late."

  • "I am happy." "Why?" "Because I won a million dollars. I am happyyou got it.

  • Right? It's a conjunction. So what it does is it takes two statements and puts them together.

  • "I did it because it was the right thing." It brings two statements together. Conjunction.

  • "Con" means "with" and "junction", like joint, joined with each other.

  • Right? So it's a basic conjunction.

  • Now, what we want to look at is "so". Here's where the difficulty comes in because "so" is a conjunction as well.

  • You'll notice Mr. E is holding an arrow -- I'm sorry, a box.

  • And it's saying -- look. They're both the same. They're both conjunctions. They both join statements together.

  • "It was hot, so I bought an ice cream." Right?

  • "What? You bought an ice cream?" "Yeah. I bought an ice cream. It was hot, so I bought an ice cream." Cool?

  • So when you're doing that, you're joining it together just like the conjunction for "because". Cool?

  • And that's what caused the problem: They're both conjunctions. But "so" answers a different question.

  • When you say the reason or you answer "why" for "because" -- "I am fat because I eat too much food."

  • This is the reason. "So" is more of a result. What happened. Okay.

  • "It was raining very, very, very, very hard, so I got wet." "What happened?" "Well, it was raining really hard."

  • "What happened?" "I got wet." "Oh." You could say this is the reason,

  • and that's why they're conjunctions. But then, "so" goes on to telling you what happened,

  • the next thing that happened, the next step. It doesn't always give you the reason for it. Right?

  • "He ate dinner at seven o'clock, so I had dinner at 7:30 because I was hungry, too."

  • Notice I said "because". That was the reason. But I said this happened,

  • this happened, and the reason was because I was hungry, too.

  • I've taken them and joined them together to show you a little bit of a difference. This is like action to action.

  • And this is why the action happened. All right?

  • There's another difference with "so" that I like. That should help you with them. "So" is also an adverb.

  • We use it to show the extent or the range -- how far it is. I'll give you an example.

  • You know me. "James talks very fast." You can also say, "James talks so fast,

  • half the time, I can't understand him." And you'll go, "What?" "Yeah. He talks so fast."

  • And that tells me the range. What we have here is verb plus "so". And that's how we show the adverb, how it works together.

  • Okay? Right. Or, "She looks so good tonight." "She looks so good" is a big range.

  • She looks really good. Smashing. Right?

  • We can also use it to tell truth. What? Yeah. I thought so. You didn't know that, right?

  • Well, I think so. In saying, "I thought so", I believe this is a true statement. This is true.

  • Or I think so, "I believe it is true." "Because" doesn't have any of that. "Because" is limited to a conjunction function only.

  • All right? So I hope you get this. Okay? So we've got the difference.

  • There is one thing for "because", right? It's a conjunction,

  • and that's an answer to "why", the reason why. And for "so", we have two things.

  • The first thing we have to look at is it answers the question of result, what happened? Right?

  • This, so this happened. Right? "People aren't buying, so we dropped our prices." So what happened?

  • Prices were dropped. Okay? But it can also be an adverb. ,

  • Modify the verb, so verb plus "so" saying how fast, how slow, how high, how low. Or we can use it in a statement

  • or a phrase -- "I thought so", "I think so" -- to talk about truth. You like that? Good.

  • Give me a second. We're going to put it together.

  • Snap, and I'm back. All right. So board change, meaning, new lesson. What we are going to do now

  • we've already discussed what the differences are, and we talked about the grammar.

  • Let's use it as examples. All right? So "Canadians are -- something -- polite. We don't talk to each other."

  • Well, what would that be? Right. We're going to look at two things.

  • Is it "because"? "Canadians are because" -- no. We're going to say "so polite".

  • And remember, there are a couple of things we learned about "so". "So" is a conjunction.

  • In this case, is it acting like a conjunction? No. We're using it as an extent. We're talking about the range, right?

  • Extent. Like "so hot", "so cold". They're so polite, right, that they don't talk to each other.

  • And it's true. You will see two Canadians walk by, smile,

  • and say nothing because they don't want to interrupt each other's personal space. It's quite cute.

  • All right. Next. How about this one? "Are you sick?" "Yes". "I thought because --" well, it doesn't seem like we're offering up a reason, does it?

  • No. So you'd probably say, "I thought so."

  • Do you remember we said "so" introduces truth? "I thought so", "I think so". All right.

  • So we're talking about truth. "I thought you were sick. I believed it was true."

  • Truth. Okay? That's the other reason we use "so".

  • Now, let's go to the other part of the board here, okay? "I helped him pay for it -- something

  • -- he was a nice guy." It seems like I've got two statements here, right? "He's a nice guy" is a statement

  • and "I helped him pay for it" -- okay. So is it, "I helped him pay for it, so he's a nice guy"?

  • That doesn't seem to make sense. "So he's a nice guy."

  • How do I know he's a nice guy? It doesn't really answer the question "what happened?"

  • What it really answers is the question "why?" Right? So we'd probably put down this, "because".

  • So, "I helped him pay for it because he's a nice guy." And that is a reason why I did something.

  • And that's what we said. "Because" is a conjunction that brings two statements together,

  • and in this case, gives us the reason. Right?

  • And how about the last one? "I broke it because I had to pay for it." Now I sound kind of crazy.

  • "I broke it because I had to pay for it." It probably didn't happen that way. That doesn't seem logical.

  • I think what happened was this: I broke it, and then somebody said,

  • "So what happened?" And I go, "I had to pay for it." Okay? So we're going to use "so".

  • And "so" is what? Remember we said reason? And we say result. The result of my action,

  • breaking it, caused me to have to pay for it. Remember, we said "because" is for "why",

  • and when we say result and we use "so", it's "what happened?" Right? Cool.

  • Hope you liked the lesson because it's a pretty good one, so I know you're going to learn for it.

  • And you've learned one, two different -- three, four different things.

  • Especially, I'm sure you learned the difference between result and reason, "so", and "because" because it was a good lesson.

  • And you know, now I've got to go. So E, you, I -- let's go. Conjunction, right?

  • Don't forget: conjunction, reason, and result, and you'll be fine. Anyway. Have a great one.

  • But before I go, I need you to go to www.engvid.com, "eng" as in "English",

  • "vid" as in "video" so you can learn more English with our other instructors because it's a pretty good site

  • and I know you'll enjoy it. Have a good one. E, let's go,

  • so you don't get into any more trouble.

Man, that car goes so fast. I'd like one, but, you know, because I don't have the money right now.

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A2 US conjunction reason happened nice guy difference pay

Basic English: Learn the difference between BECAUSE and SO

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    Ashley Chen posted on 2015/03/01
Video vocabulary