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  • Hello. Do you have to learn grammar? I have to learn grammar sometimes. I'm a grammar

  • teacher. And I know grammar is really, really difficult sometimes. And it just makes you

  • want to scream, pull your hair out, freak out, and cry sometimes. "I hate grammar."

  • The reason why grammar is so difficult is because it's confusing; you have to remember

  • so many rules; and then, there are exceptions to these so many rules; and it's just really

  • confusing; and it's very different from your native language or languages, depending on

  • how many you speak. So really, really easy, really effective method to learn any grammar

  • ever in the world. So today's lesson is how to learn, remember, and use any grammar that

  • is on a test, whether you're taking TOEFL or TOEIC or IELTS or Cambridge -- anything

  • that you have to remember grammar for, this is going to be a godsend for you. It's going

  • to help you so much. Great. So let's get into it.

  • First one, you have two points to remember. That's it. Two. Done. The first one is the

  • structure. You have to remember and know how the grammar is made. Okay? The second point

  • is how or why do we use this? Why do I need to learn this stupid grammar? Am I ever going

  • to use it in real life? Why would I say this? Why do I need present perfect? Why can't I

  • just use simple past? Why do I need continuous? Why do I need passive? These are the questions

  • you have to ask two people, one, your teacher, and two, yourself. If you are teaching English

  • and you don't know structure, and more importantly, how and why, you've got some homework to do.

  • People -- students have asked me, "Teacher, why?" "I don't know." Just say to them,

  • "I don't know." Go look it up. Do some research. Find the answer. The best thing is to find

  • your own answer if you have to do this. So let's dive into this.

  • First of all, when I say "structure", I mean how do you make the grammar? How do you make

  • the sentence? So if I give you the example of present continuous, this is the name of

  • the grammar. If you just remember the name of the grammar, it's useless. So it comes

  • to the test and it says, "Write a present continuous sentence." He's like, "Uh, I know

  • present continuous. How do you make it?"

  • So the way that I always remember grammar is I always like to use a subject. Now, if

  • you want to replace the word "subject" with any other word like [random sounds] or "dog",

  • that's cool. But I like to use "subject" as my beginning.

  • Then, for present continuous, it's going to be "to be verb". But instead of just writing

  • "to be verb", it really, really helps you if you write out the different forms of the

  • "to be" verb. So for example, "I am", "he is", "we are". Okay?

  • The second thing -- sorry. The last thing in the present continuous that makes the verb

  • continuous is you're going to have the -ing. So the structure or the form that I like to

  • use for the present continuous is subject + "am", "is", "are" + verb + ing. The present

  • continuous also has another name, which is "present progressive". They're exactly the

  • same grammar point. The usages are the same. But it's just a different word for it. Don't

  • worry. It's cool. Don't worry about it. So

  • next step -- we've got the structure. Next step, very important, how or why do I use

  • this? Why do I need to use this grammar? Why do I need to learn this grammar? You need

  • to learn it because it's on your test. But as soon as the test is finished, why would

  • I use this? How would I say this in my life? Answer -- actions you are doing now. What

  • are you doing right now? Are you watching a video? I think you are. So maybe you're

  • watching a video. Maybe you're eating something. Maybe you're brushing your teeth. I can't

  • see you. You can see me. What are you doing? Ah. Okay. Good. So present continuous, as

  • an example, structure, how and why.

  • Another really, really good thing to do is to write down as many examples as you can.

  • It's always good to practice the grammar written. Also, talk. Speak. Get a video recorder and

  • talk into it -- or tape recorder, digital recorder. Listen to yourself saying the new

  • grammar sentences. It will help you remember if you play it back.

  • Let's use this theory. Let's learn some new grammar. Maybe it's old grammar. It's okay.

  • Past simple, so first of all, structure. How do I make past simple? Do you know? Do you

  • know? Okay. Past simple is going to be subject + a past tense of the verb, and usually, we're

  • going to have a noun or a complement to the verb. So you have subject + past tense + noun.

  • For example, "I ate dinner." Yay. Okay. Uh-oh. So what -- hold on. So I've remembered the

  • structure, but I need to know why would I use this? Why is this useful in my life? How

  • or why? How do we use this? We use this to talk about past -- I'm going to say "boring".

  • Some people like to say "routine". But it's basically for past events. And usually, we

  • have a time marker in this. We don't have to have a time marker as a rule, but usually,

  • we throw in a time marker just to help us distinguish it from present perfect.

  • So rule No. 1, structure. How do you make the grammar? No. 2, how and why do I use this?

  • Why do I use this? This is how you're going to connect this for your brain. Step 3, I

  • didn't write it down, but that's okay. Think of, write down, talk about as many examples

  • as you can. But very importantly, make the examples relevant to you, to your life. Don't

  • think about examples about someone else that you don't know or things that you don't care

  • about. Try and make them for you. This will help you remember why the grammar is important.

  • What are you doing right now? What did you do yesterday? So simple past. "I ate dinner.

  • I went for a walk. It was really cold. It was so cold. But I did it." Right now, I'm

  • teaching you. I'm breathing. Are you breathing? I hope you're breathing. I'm watching you.

  • You're watching me. It's fantastic.

  • So the next time you're in grammar class or you're trying learn grammar by yourself -- it

  • doesn't matter what language it is -- always think of these two very easy steps. One, structure;

  • two, how and why. I guarantee you that this will help you so much. I guarantee it so much

  • that you will get your money back from somewhere if it doesn't work. Call this 1-800 number.

  • Give it a chance. Bye.

Hello. Do you have to learn grammar? I have to learn grammar sometimes. I'm a grammar

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A2 grammar present continuous continuous present structure subject

How to learn grammar – any grammar!!!

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