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  • [MUSIC]

  • Good afternoon.

  • Thank you, thanks for inviting me.

  • Today I want to help all of you sell your ideas the Steve Jobs way.

  • I'd like to call this the new rules of persuasive presentations.

  • Because I think too, a lot of you, these

  • techniques will be new, or at least maybe it's

  • a new way of looking at an old problem,

  • which is how do we sell our ideas effectively?

  • As graduate students at Stanford, you all have ideas to share.

  • You have ideas for new products, new businesses, new methods, new

  • ways of doing things, ideas that are gonna change the world.

  • Some people, are better than others at telling their story.

  • Steve Jobs, for example, is an extraordinary storyteller.

  • He's so exceptional, in fact, I wrote an entire book on him.

  • The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs.

  • Now this book I am proud to say has become an international best seller.

  • And companies around the world, companies that

  • recruit from Stanford are using some of

  • these techniques to completely transform the way

  • they communicate the vision behind their companies.

  • How many of you were here when Alan Mullaly spoke, CEO Ford, last week?

  • Alan called me personally last year, called me on my cell phone,

  • I was actually in the gym at the time on my treadmill.

  • Kind of embarrassing, I'm running out thinking,

  • why is this guy calling from Detroit?

  • And he said, this is Alan Mullaly from Ford, just wanna

  • know, I read this cover to cover, it's really helped a lot.

  • So that's the kind of reaction I'm getting from people.

  • But it's not just about Steve Jobs, I'm going

  • to give you ideas from many, many other communicators

  • who consciously or not applied the very same techniques

  • when they're pitching their companies or pitching their products.

  • But let's begin with a premise, I hope we can all agree with?

  • A person can have the greatest idea in the world, but

  • if that person cannot convince enough other people it doesn't matter.

  • It's always mattered to Steve Jobs.

  • Steve Jobs always thinks differently about communicating the vision behind Apple.

  • Now what can the rest of us learn?

  • I learned quite a bit, techniques that I now offer my clients.

  • And my clients touch your life every single day.

  • From the computers you buy, to the electronic gadgets you use, to

  • the foods you eat, to the medical devices that keep you healthy.

  • To the cars you drive, to the gas that goes

  • into those cars, and the energy that keeps America moving forward.

  • My clients are in the news every day.

  • They improve your life every day, and they are using these techniques, and

  • some of them here, [UNKNOWN], especially which is a big client of mine,.

  • Recruits directly from Standford, and they are using these techniques.

  • So I hope that you are a receptive audience.

  • I want to teach you some of the techniques that we use with high level executives.

  • Okay?

  • Shall I go through them?

  • [NOISE] The ones that apply to you

  • specifically, the ones that you can adopt today.

  • For your very next presentation.

  • I'm gonna start with the most important one [LAUGH].

  • Passion.

  • Passion is everything.

  • You cannot inspire unless you're inspired yourself.

  • And for Steve Jobs, passion plays a very, very important role at Apple.

  • In 1997, Steve Jobs returned to Apple.

  • After a 12 year absence.

  • Apple was very close to bankruptcy at the time.

  • Steve Jobs held an informal staff meeting.

  • I'm going to show you a clip from that meeting.

  • It's informal and you can tell because he's wearing shorts.

  • When he really wants to dress up he'll wear blue jeans and running shoes.

  • So informal staff meeting, but listen to the role

  • passion would play in the revitalizing the Apple brand.

  • >> [INAUDIBLE] Marketing's about values.

  • This is a very complicated world, it's a very noisy world.

  • And we're not gonna get a chance to get people to remember much about us.

  • No company is.

  • And so we have to be really clear on what we want [INAUDIBLE] to know about us.

  • Our customers want to know who is Apple and what is it that we stand for?

  • [COUGH] Where do we get influence?

  • And

  • [BLANK_AUDIO]

  • what, what about us.

  • Isn't making boxes for people to get their jobs done, although we

  • do that well, we do that better than almost anybody in some cases.

  • [LAUGH] But Apple's about something more than that.

  • Apple, at the core, it's core value, is that we believe

  • that people with passion, can, change the world for the better.

  • [INAUDIBLE] >> People with passion.

  • Can change the world for the better.

  • This man certainly believes that.

  • Richard Tait was a client of mine about five years ago.

  • Classic American Entrepreneur.

  • Sketches an idea, on the back of

  • an airplane napkin during a cross-country flight.

  • An idea for a board game, in which

  • everyone could excel, in one area or another.

  • Some people are better at trivia, art, culture, music.

  • What game did he build?

  • [CROSSTALK].

  • Cranium.

  • What can Craniam headquarters?

  • And you are here with a wave of fun, and enthusiasm, and engagement.

  • The likes of which I have rarely seen in corporate America.

  • But again you need to understand that it starts from the leader,

  • it starts from the entrepreneur whose vision it was to build that company.

  • But what is Richard Tait passionate about?

  • Passion is contagious by the way.

  • He is passionate not so much about building

  • board games, he's passionate about building self esteem.

  • And it comes across in every conversation you have with him.

  • And in every television interview.

  • Especially when he's asked a question like, where do great ideas come from?

  • >> [INAUDIBLE] I, I can feel these ideas.

  • You just know when you're on to something.

  • And just don't take no for an answer.

  • You've just got to keep pushing, you know.

  • resilience and perseverance.

  • Those are the key characteristics of an entrepreneur.

  • They can feel the idea and just don't take no for an answer.

  • We [UNKNOWN] potentially when we got sacked at first, and they

  • said just don't leave your day jobs you know you're crazy.

  • Everyone was telling it as we were crazy.

  • I even called up my own dad and I said to him I was gonna leave

  • Microsoft and start a games company and he said to me, what should I tell my friends?

  • This is how i followed my heart.

  • [INAUDIBLE] in a history.

  • And to this day you know, I have say

  • to anyone is, is preserver and even feel the idea.

  • You see it you know it.

  • Yeah, you've got your friends and you worry about your, your friends, you know

  • when you get that look the test is this a good idea or not.

  • And then you know you're on to something.

  • >> Well as so you said I'm going to put

  • you in one of the greatest hits big ideas, because.

  • Everything you say is a [NOISE] [UNKNOWN] form of success.

  • [INAUDIBLE] to the other people, don't take no, follow your track, go for it.

  • I mean you just, you just get, you're the embodiment.

  • I love it, love it.

  • [CROSSTALK] [LAUGH].

  • >> One thing I've learned from this show which I saw, I, I

  • was watching this show every other day, you guys were talking about customers.

  • [UNKNOWN] people call Craniacs.

  • And I've never forgotten that our customers are our sales force.

  • We've sold a million games with no advertising.

  • All by our customers talking about our products, sharing those experiences.

  • >> By the way.

  • >> We sold a million games with no advertising.

  • Our customers are our best sales force.

  • Did you see the reaction of the host?

  • Passion is contagious.

  • What I first worked with, for Richard Tait, a colleague of

  • mine, said that within five minutes you're gonna wanna work at Cranium.

  • Now, I didn't go to work for Cranium, but I understand, I understand.

  • When I interviewed Suze Orman, who is one of the world's great financial planners,

  • I asked her point blank, I said:

  • What makes you such an extraordinary communicator?

  • She said: because I learned to appeal to somebody's heart before their brain.

  • I understand what she's saying, you need to make emotional connections with people.

  • You need to share what you're passionate about.

  • She's not passionate about mutual funds.

  • Suze Orman is passionate about avoiding the crushing financial debt that caused

  • so much pain for her and her family as she was growing up.

  • What does Starbucks sell?

  • What do they sell?

  • >> Coffee.

  • >> Coffee.

  • So why is it that when I interviewed Howard Shultz for a Business Week

  • article and a book about three years ago, he rarely mentioned the word coffee?

  • I thought he was selling coffee.

  • Cuz that's not what he is selling, and he was very adamant about it.

  • They are selling a work place that treats people with dignity and respect.

  • Happy customers or happy employees equal happy customers, what a formula.

  • It works for Starbucks but he rarely mentioned the word coffee and I

  • said, how it, why are you talking about coffee, that's what you sell.

  • He said, well sure I like coffee.

  • But that's not what my business stands for.

  • So, you need to ask yourselves, what am I passionate about.

  • And It's not the obvious.

  • Howard Schultz is not passionate about coffee.

  • Suze Orman is not selling mutual funds.

  • Richard Tait is not selling board games.

  • And Steve Jobs is not selling computers.

  • He's selling tools to help you unleash your personal creativity.

  • There's a big difference.

  • But that's the very first question you need to ask yourself,

  • when you're creating the message behind your product, or company, or service.

  • What is it that I'm truly passionate about?

  • Now let's dig into, real techniques, that you

  • can use today for your very next presentation.

  • How many of you are on Twitter?

  • My Twitter handle is [UNKNOWN], if you like to

  • follow me, I'd like to continue this conversation with you.

  • How many of characters does Twitter allow?

  • [CROSSTALK] 140.

  • I think that's a great exercise.

  • If you cannot explain what you do in 140 characters, go back to the drawing board.

  • It's important, because your brain craves meaning before details.

  • A neuroscientist at the University of Washington, John Medina, taught me this.

  • He said, [INAUDIBLE], when primitive man ran into a tiger.

  • He did not ask.

  • How many teeth does the tiger have?

  • He asked, will it eat me?

  • Should I run?

  • Big picture before details.

  • This is the way your brain wants to process information.

  • What's wrong with this slide?

  • [LAUGH].

  • Typical slide, right?

  • This was delivered by a Morgan Stanley analyst at a technology conference.

  • She had about twenty minutes, and she wanted to deliver 8 big idea, 8 themes.

  • That's too much information.

  • Where's the big picture before the details?

  • These actually support a broader theme.

  • A couple of journalists who were in the room at the time

  • wrote about it much more simply, but they focused on the big picture.

  • One of the headlines was, the mobile

  • internet is growing faster than you've ever imagined.

  • Now imagine if she had come out to say,

  • the mobile internet is growing faster than you've ever imagined.

  • And I'm gonna tell you, why?

  • What's more interesting, this slide which I

  • created in two minutes [SOUND] or this one?

  • Big picture, before details.

  • Steve Jobs does this all the time.

  • When he introduced the MacBook Air, this could have been a very typical slide.

  • The average communicator would have created the slide like this.

  • Today, we are very excited to introduce a thin, lightweight notebook computer.

  • It has a 13 inch wide screen display, backlit keyboard, Intel Processor.

  • What's the problem here?

  • Too much information.

  • What's the big picture?

  • In a sentence, it's the world's thinnest notebook.

  • Isn't that much more interesting and easier for

  • you to process than all of the details first.

  • It's the world's thinnest notebook.

  • That's the way Steve Jobs framed it.

  • What do you notice about the slide.

  • Simple, visual, and when he delivers the headline.

  • The one thing that he wants you to remember, that's all he has on the slide.

  • He does this all the time.

  • In every presentation.

  • What's the iPad?

  • The iPad is our most advanced technology.

  • In a magical and revolutionary device.

  • That was