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  • He said he was a member of parliament so I trusted him.

  • He told me he wished me to meet another member.

  • His member for love.

  • He locked the door,

  • I pleaded for my maidenhood, but...

  • The words are common place but they deserve the frontest piece.

  • Show them Maud.

  • The execution for the member of love.

  • The delicate rendering

  • of the crimson tip.

  • I don't have to borrow, very rare.

  • I had it as a young man, it was sold in difficultly.

  • For a shilling.

  • I would not part with it now for fifty pounds.

  • But having slipped the bolt off the door..

  • A curator of poisons, as my uncle described himself to me.

  • I was twelve years old when he began inoculating me with poison.

  • Grain by grain, scruple by scruple.

  • So I should be immune to what I read.

  • Be his librarian.

  • And when he lost his sight, his eyes.

  • So they came together.

  • The romance might have been somewhat unusual,

  • but that gave it all the charm of the unexpected.

  • And there, as the red sun tinges the sky,

  • and the chatter of birds heralds the coming night,

  • we must leave them.

  • You don't care for your uncles subjects?

  • I'm his secretary, it's a matter of total indifference to me.

  • I find it rather curious to find a lady so cool

  • and unmoved by something designed to stir the emotions.

  • Most ladies in those books and paintings seem to me to be singularly unmoved by it.

  • You are very uncommon, Miss Lilly.

  • So I understand Sir.

  • Miss Lilly.

  • Dear Miss Lilly, we need to talk. It's about your mother's will.

  • I know nothing of what I read from those books, Sir.

  • I've not come for that, Miss Lilly.

  • I can get that in the street corner.

  • I'm here to help you.

  • How much do you think you'll receive when you marry?

  • A few hundred.

  • Forty thousand pounds.

  • Who told you such nonsense?

  • Hawtrey.

  • You're the talk of the shady book shops in London and in Paris.

  • Your readings

  • and the favors men imagine follow them.

  • Your uncle is a villain, Miss Lilly!

  • And you are not?

  • I came here to seduce you.

  • Secure your fortune.

  • But I saw what life has made of you and I knew it wouldn't work.

  • To a woman like you it would be an insult.

  • Instead I want to free you.

  • You are very gallant, Mr. Rivers.

  • Suppose I don't care to be freed.

  • I think you long for it.

  • Go please, go!

  • Good afternoon, Miss Lilly.

  • Good afternoon, Mr. Rivers.

  • Will you marry me?

  • How dare you?

  • He's lively today, ain't he Mr. Rivers?

  • Not as lively as me, Charles.

  • I swear I will not touch you after the ceremony,

  • we will go our separate ways.

  • Why would you do such a thing?

  • For half your fortune.

  • I'd tell him his idea was nonsense.

  • My uncle would pursue me.

  • Not if he thinks you're in the mad house he whispers.

  • But it would not be me who was locked up.

  • His plan is to install a new maid

  • a compliant chaperon. A thief

  • who will think she's cheating me.

  • Instead, we will cheat her.

  • She will take with her into the mad house all the taint of my mothers madness,

  • my uncles filth,

  • my very name.

  • He is right.

  • I would be free.

  • I return to London in three days.

  • I must secure the maid when I go back.

  • We will never have this chance again! Will you?

  • No. It would be foul.

  • Putting a girl in the mad house.

  • The girl's despicable, a thief.

  • She would do it to you.

  • My uncle will be here at any moment.

  • You must not open that.

  • You belong out there!

  • Not locked up here with this filth!

  • Go!

  • Go!

  • There was an obstacle to Mr. Rivers plan.

  • My maid Agnes.

  • The way he painted that fruit, Miss.

  • You could eat it.

  • He has an eye for it.

  • And for you Miss.

  • Are you all right, Miss Lilly?

  • I think she may have twisted her ankle, Sir.

  • Really, Agnes.

  • I have not.

  • Oh well, we must take no chance of that, Miss Lilly.

  • It's treacherous ground here.

  • Allow me to assist you.

  • I cannot just dismiss Agnes.

  • Leave it to me.

  • Agnes, every time that I've looked into her eyes,

  • I was thinking of you!

  • Mr. Way, Mr. Way!

  • Agnes!

  • I was shaken by what we had done to Agnes.

  • But my uncle had trained me to well to feel it for long.

  • Mr. Rivers returned to London.

  • Recommending the new maid,

  • whose character was as false as her courtesy.

  • Here is the evil little fingersmith who's going to make us rich.

  • Remember, she has to become you. And you her.

  • You have one month until I return.

  • Is it all right, Miss?

  • Very satisfactory.

  • She has come to Briar to swallow me up.

  • Like clutch of eggs.

  • What do London ladies do this time of day?

  • Make visits, to other ladies like you Miss.

  • Ladies like me?

  • There are no ladies like me.

  • But I grew used to her,

  • to her life, her warmth.

  • She was not the gullible girl of a villaineers plot.

  • But a girl with a history, with hates and likings.

  • Yet to escape from Briar

  • I must despise her. Must deceive her.

  • Miss.

  • It's not bad news, is it Miss?

  • Mr. Rivers is coming tomorrow.

  • Oh lord!

  • I must change our dresses.

  • This one for sure.

  • I want you to have that.

  • Me Miss? But this is your best dress?

  • I want to show Mr. Rivers that...

  • That I do so much approve of you. Of his choice.

  • Oh Miss!

  • That's one of the nicest things any one's ever said to me.

  • But really, I can't.

  • I can't, really, Sue.

  • She looked so beautiful.

  • I had to keep telling myself, over and over again, what she planned to do to me.

  • To go on.

  • Oh my goodness, Miss!

  • I look like a real lady.

  • She changed even my uncles books for me.

  • I thought them dead

  • but the words came suddenly alive.

  • Full of meaning.

  • She must think we love one another!

  • Oh damn it, Maud!

  • There's another hour gone.

  • In two days I will leave.

  • And I will never see you again.

  • Wake her up, she'll burn.

  • Let go of me.

  • I've lost half for this.

  • Lost it to a wretched little fingersmith.

  • Let me..

  • She'd laugh in your face if she knew.

  • If I told her.

  • You mustn't.

  • I agree.

  • Do you want to stay here forever?

  • Appear to love me. Marry me!

  • I can't.

  • Maud!

  • - Miss Maud? - Please.

  • Miss Maud?

  • She's coming.

  • Tell me..

  • Tell me a way..

  • Tell you what, Miss?

  • Tell me,

  • on her wedding night, what must a wife do?

  • Aren't you a pearl.

  • Everything I say to myself is changed.

  • She has touched the life of me.

  • The quake of me.

  • But she is ashamed.

  • He'll be leaving here tonight Miss.

  • She didn't love me.

  • her feelings were false, part of a trap.

  • Why should I not trap her to escape from this foul place.

  • The night I escaped, I needed to do one last thing.

  • How fast your heart beats Maud.

  • I told you I don't want to hurt you.

  • But we must show the marks of true love.

  • Are you by any chance bleeding

  • to save me the pain?

  • Do you mean to insult me in every possible way?

  • Hold out the sheet.

  • The fashionable couple on their wedding night.

  • Sit down here Susan.

  • Miss Smith.

  • Were you ever a maid with Lady Stonely of Mayfair?

  • No Sir.

  • That's one of poor Mrs. Rivers fantasies.

  • Ever since the wedding night she's made up these stories.

  • Fiction... Yes.

  • Does she read books?

  • Her passion is books.

  • There you have it Graves.

  • The over exposure of women to literature breeds unnatural fantasies.

  • - Indeed. - Unnatural?

  • Oh Sir, you don't know the worst of it.

  • It's not your shame, Susan, your guilt.

  • You did nothing to invite the gross intentions

  • my wife and her madness tried to force upon you.

  • Is this true?

  • Please, these tears speak themselves.

  • Come on Susan!

  • You are not to blame.

  • I'm so sorry you were exposed to such horrible things.

  • Speak, damn you, speak!

  • Oh my own poor Mistress.

  • My heart was breaking.

  • That is my story.

  • That is what brought me here.

  • You were very convincing Maud.

  • Don't speak to me or I shall kill you.

  • I have betrayed her.

  • Mrs. Rivers.

  • Sit Mrs. Rivers over there, if you will.

  • You see, they tricked me.

  • She's fit, can't do it.

  • Hold her steady, man! She may pull off her joints!

  • We will not have you lying here, Mrs. Rivers.

  • You can choke yourself and it's no business of ours.

  • Chew off your tongue if you like.

  • We prefer them quite here.

  • Welcome to London.

  • How could we have done this to her?

  • Believe me,

  • she'll be better taken care of than where she came from.

  • Are we here?

  • Is this our house?

  • I thought for a moment that was the Briar bell.

  • We're near the river.

  • Chelsea?

  • Not quite.

  • Lant Street.

  • Wow...

  • Come on or I shall leave you here.

  • We cannot live grandly, Maud, until we have your money.

  • We'll just wait for the lawyers to release it.

  • Do you want to stay out here and freeze?

  • Mr. Ibbs.

  • Mrs. Maud Rivers.

  • Very pleased to meet you, Mrs. Rivers.

  • Do come in, make yourself at home.

  • Couldn't you imagine a better night than this, Mr. Ibbs?

  • This is a very good night, gentleman.

  • A very good night indeed.

  • Let me take the ladies cloak.

  • Do beg me a pardon.

  • Who's she?

  • How much are you going to pop that for, Mr. Ibbs.