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  • Silence shared in words

  • present

  • Heart to Heart Talks

  • I don’t think anybody has spoken

  • really spontaneously the way I am speaking

  • And I was not aware

  • that my spontaneity

  • would have such a tremendous effect on people

  • I am not an orator; I have never been

  • trained for oratory

  • I am just talking the way I talk

  • when you see me personally

  • I don t see any difference

  • But one man who was the first to introduce me to the West

  • Aubrey Menen

  • He is an Anglo-lndian journalist

  • but he lives in England

  • a very famous journalist, one of the topmost

  • He was the first man to introduce me to the West.

  • He wrote the first book which mentioned me.

  • The book’s name is The New Mystics.

  • Not only did he mention me, he has my picture on the cover.

  • I could not believe what he had written about me.

  • He wrote that he has heard the greatest orators of this century

  • Winston Churchill, Adolf Hitler, Jawaharlal Nehru,

  • President Kennedyhe has listened to all these people,

  • sitting very closely, in the front row, because he was a top journalist.

  • And he says that he was never influenced by anybody

  • the way he was influenced by me.

  • I could not believe my eyes.

  • I said, “What is this man talking about? Adolf Hitler was a great orator,

  • Kennedy was a great orator, Jawaharlal was a great orator,

  • Winston Churchill was a great orator;

  • and he is comparing me, who is not an orator at all,

  • What has impressed him?

  • He says,

  • What has impressed me is

  • I could see simply that this man is absolutely unprepared.

  • He does not know what he is going to say next,

  • but somehow even, thing falls in line.

  • His sentences are small, conversational,

  • as if he is talking man to man,

  • not to a crowd.”

  • When you are talking to a crowd,

  • you are talking to the walls:

  • you are not human in your talk.

  • Winston Churchill said that

  • when he started talking

  • and became

  • an orator,

  • he was very nervous.

  • Later he said, truthfully, he was still nervous

  • when he stood on the podium;

  • he still felt the same first nervousness he had felt sixty years before.

  • But the same trick always helped.

  • And what was his trick? This must be the trick of many

  • great orators. He says, “the first thing that I

  • repeat in my mind is that all these people are idiots;

  • you need not be afraid of them.

  • And once

  • I settle it in my mind that these are all idiots, then I start speaking.

  • Who is afraid of idiots?

  • And then one word leads to another

  • and then gathers momentum;

  • then one is just

  • going like a computer.”

  • All your great orators

  • are just

  • repeating speeches

  • already written

  • by their secretaries.

  • Jawaharlal’s secretary, told me that all his speeches were written by him.

  • Not only has he told me, he has written in his memoirs

  • that all those great speeches that Jawaharlal was famous for

  • were written by him.

  • And before going,

  • Jawaharlal would have a look

  • at the speech,

  • and figure out

  • how he was going to manage it.

  • But

  • with me it is a totally different matter.

  • You are not idiots.

  • I am speaking to people

  • who are potentially enlightened beings;

  • I am speaking with immense respect

  • and love.

  • And I have never felt any kind of nervousness because

  • I am not an orator,

  • I am just

  • conversing with you.

  • Hence, many times it is bound to happen:

  • I will tell only half a story,

  • and then,

  • wherever the wind blows,

  • my cloud starts moving.

  • I have never made any effort

  • that things should be otherwise.

  • I want to remain absolutely spontaneous.

  • And I want you also to hear me spontaneously.

  • In the same way I don’t know what I am going to say,

  • you should also be

  • in that emptiness

  • where you don’t know what you are going to hear.

  • Then there is a possibility

  • of a transmission

  • of something which is not in the words

  • but follows the words like a shadow

  • or an aroma.

  • Then the word will be there;

  • you will hear the word,

  • but the fragrance, the shadow,

  • will enter your being

  • and will stir your heart.

  • My whole effort is not to convince your intellect:

  • It is to have a little love affair with your heart.

  • These are heart-to-heart talks,

  • not oratory:

  • Not great

  • lectures,

  • but just simple, human talks.

  • So forgive me,

  • I am going to remain the same way

  • but you can always

  • remind me

  • that I have left something out in the middle.

  • I can always complete it.

  • I would love to complete it but what can I do?

  • There is so much to sayand nothing to say.

  • You can understand my problem:

  • so much to say

  • that even if I go on for lives

  • it will still be there

  • and nothing to say,

  • because that which I want to give to you

  • is not something which can be said.

  • I am living in this dilemma

  • but trying

  • for some middle way;

  • and

  • I have the feeling I have found the middle way.

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Silence shared in words

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A2 UK osho winston churchill churchill winston written journalist

OSHO: Heart to Heart Talks

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    Buddhima Xue posted on 2014/08/27
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