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  • Hey guys, I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking

  • and welcome to this lesson on "adjective and preposition combinations."

  • Okay. So first of all, we have to understand what an adjective is.

  • As a reminder, an adjective is a word that describes something.

  • They can describe a noun. So when you look at these adjectives or these sentences ,

  • I want you to just tell me if you can identify the adjectives.

  • What are the adjectives in these sentences?

  • So he's not interested

  • ___ writing. Okay, the adjective

  • is "interested."

  • Okay, so interested describes this person's state.

  • He is not interested something writing.

  • Okay. The other one, I am excited

  • ___ your birthday. "Excited"

  • Okay. I think you're starting to see the pattern, right?

  • So Joanna is "afraid."

  • I think she's "tired." He is "worried."

  • Mark is "good."

  • Okay, so these are adjectives, adjectives, adjectives,

  • and more adjectives. I'll...now in English we often have adjectives combined with prepositions

  • to create an expression or a small phrase, and we can follow these

  • prepositions with either a gerund, which is an "ING,"

  • a noun, or a verb acting like a noun

  • or just a noun in general. So you notice

  • writing, your birthday, failing,

  • trying, his test, cooking

  • Okay, so we have some gerunds and we have some nouns.

  • Now before this we have to understand which prepositions

  • are commonly put with these adjectives. So in the first sentence he's not

  • interested

  • ___ writing. So think of as many prepositions as you can. You have "at, on, in."

  • "You have "about, around, by, with"

  • Tons and tons and tons of possibilities.

  • So what you have to know is okay which preposition always goes with this adjective.

  • So the first one maybe you know this: He's not interested

  • "in" writing. I'm not interested in doing something.

  • The second one: I am excited ___

  • your birthday. Hey you're excited "about" something usually.

  • I'm excited about your birthday.

  • You can also say I am excited

  • " for" your birthday. But the most common preposition here after excited is,

  • you are usually excited "about" something.

  • So you can be excited about a person's birthday.

  • you can be excited about your vacation.

  • you can be excited about doing something this weekend with your friends.

  • Okay, next one: Joanna is afraid

  • ___ failing. Afraid is commonly followed by

  • "of"

  • She is afraid "of" failing. She does not want to fail.

  • It's similar to saying scared "of" and so Joanna is scared of failing,

  • afraid of failing. She does not want to fail. The next one:

  • I think she's tired ___ trying. So she has been trying and trying and trying

  • again and again.

  • And now she has grown tired "of" it.

  • So far we have "in, about

  • of, of." Let's do another one:

  • He's worried ___ his test.

  • Now if I say, he's worried

  • "for" his test. What do you think the meaning of that is?

  • It's possible to say he's worried "for," but

  • in this situation, if you say he's worried "for" his test,

  • it means that,you know, his... his test is like

  • a person kinda thing. His test has feelings

  • and maybe his test is depressed, so he's worried

  • for his test that his test is gonna cry or something.

  • So here, he is worried "about," alright?

  • He's worried "about" his test, about his score. And the last one:

  • Mark is good ___ cooking. Mark is good

  • "at"

  • Okay, this is a really really common expression.

  • It means you have ability in something okay

  • so if you have good ability, you are good "at" something.

  • So Mark is good at cooking. Mark is great

  • at cooking, excellent at cooking.

  • If you want to do the opposite, you can say

  • a person is "bad at" something, or "terrible

  • at" something, "awful at" something,

  • horrible at something. Okay so

  • guys these expressions are really really important and

  • the prepositions, please please please please

  • remember the correct prepositions that you have to use after these adjectives.

  • Because if you use a different preposition, it will not make sense.

  • Okay so if you want to test your understanding of

  • these expressions, these adjective preposition combinations,

  • just check out the quiz on engVid.com. Good luck guys. Take care.

Hey guys, I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking

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A2 US adjective test excited preposition worried birthday

Adjective & Preposition Combinations (English Grammar)

Video vocabulary