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  • I'm here because I have a very important message:

  • I think we have found

  • the most important factor for success.

  • And it was found close to here, Stanford.

  • Psychology professor took kids that were four years old

  • and put them in a room all by themselves.

  • And he would tell the child, a four-year-old kid,

  • "Johnny, I am going to leave you here with a marshmallow

  • for 15 minutes.

  • If, after I come back, this marshmallow is here,

  • you will get another one. So you will have two."

  • To tell a four-year-old kid to wait 15 minutes

  • for something that they like,

  • is equivalent to telling us, "We'll bring you coffee in two hours."

  • (Laughter)

  • Exact equivalent.

  • So what happened when the professor left the room?

  • As soon as the door closed...

  • two out of three ate the marshmallow.

  • Five seconds, 10 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds,

  • two minutes, four minutes, eight minutes.

  • Some lasted 14-and-a-half minutes.

  • (Laughter)

  • Couldn't do it. Could not wait.

  • What's interesting is that one out of three

  • would look at the marshmallow and go like this ...

  • Would look at it.

  • Put it back.

  • They would walk around. They would play with their skirts and pants.

  • That child already, at four, understood

  • the most important principle for success,

  • which is the ability to delay gratification.

  • Self-discipline:

  • the most important factor for success.

  • 15 years later, 14 or 15 years later,

  • follow-up study.

  • What did they find?

  • They went to look for these kids who were now 18 and 19.

  • And they found that 100 percent

  • of the children that had not eaten the marshmallow were successful.

  • They had good grades. They were doing wonderful.

  • They were happy. They had their plans.

  • They had good relationships with the teachers, students.

  • They were doing fine.

  • A great percentage of the kids that ate the marshmallow,

  • they were in trouble.

  • They did not make it to university.

  • They had bad grades. Some of them dropped out.

  • A few were still there with bad grades.

  • A few had good grades.

  • I had a question in my mind: Would Hispanic kids

  • react the same way as the American kids?

  • So I went to Colombia. And I reproduced the experiment.

  • And it was very funny. I used four, five and six years old kids.

  • And let me show you what happened.

  • (Spanish) (Laughter)

  • So what happened in Colombia?

  • Hispanic kids, two out of three ate the marshmallow;

  • one out of three did not.

  • This little girl was interesting;

  • she ate the inside of the marshmallow.

  • (Laughter)

  • In other words, she wanted us to think that she had not eaten it, so she would get two.

  • But she ate it.

  • So we know she'll be successful. But we have to watch her.

  • (Laughter)

  • She should not go into banking, for example,

  • or work at a cash register.

  • But she will be successful.

  • And this applies for everything. Even in sales.

  • The sales person that --

  • the customer says, "I want that." And the person says, "Okay, here you are."

  • That person ate the marshmallow.

  • If the sales person says, "Wait a second.

  • Let me ask you a few questions to see if this is a good choice."

  • Then you sell a lot more.

  • So this has applications in all walks of life.

  • I end with -- the Koreans did this.

  • You know what? This is so good

  • that we want a marshmallow book for children.

  • We did one for children. And now it is all over Korea.

  • They are teaching these kids exactly this principle.

  • And we need to learn that principle here in the States,

  • because we have a big debt.

  • We are eating more marshmallows than we are producing.

  • Thank you so much.

I'm here because I have a very important message:

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A2 US marshmallow ate laughter hispanic principle colombia

Joachim de Posada: Don't eat the marshmallow!

  • 25181 2015
    許瓊文 posted on 2014/09/16
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