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  • Today we are going to talk about a drink called "QQ milky milky extremely delicious to the

  • point that Miē pū tea" aka bubble tea or boba tea depending on where you live.

  • As you might have noticed the (name of) this drink is outrageously flamboyant, but you

  • know what is also flamboyant?

  • Boba liberalism!

  • But what is it?

  • Let's find out, with people also ask.

  • Hi, I am Shao, Welcome to what people also ask, where I search something seemingly obvious on Google

  • and share with you some of its PAA, aka People Also Ask, which is a feature telling you what

  • other people also search on Google that related to your query.

  • Today I want to talk about drink that is very famous in in Taiwan called boba tea or bubble tea, and I will tell you why

  • it is also called "QQ milky milky extremely delicious to the point that Miē pū tea"

  • at the end of the video.

  • So obviously we have to first talk about what it is with the first PAA "What is bubble tea made out of?

  • which is published by...Let me check my note

  • which is actually a script...it's all scripted

  • the answer is extracted from an article titled " Make Boba for Bubble Tea" published

  • by Scientific American, which is the oldest continuously published monthly popular science

  • magazine in the United States founded by an inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter in 1845.

  • According to this article, Boba tea or bubble tea is a sweetened drink made of flavored tea, milk, and bubbles aka boba.

  • Which is a definition that I, as a Taiwanese approve of.

  • According to this article, translucent, squishy bubbles called boba are very easy to make.

  • You only need three ingredients: tapioca flour, water, and brown sugar.

  • This article provides a child-friendly recipe for boba-making, it also shared some interesting

  • scientific fun facts that I had never thought of.

  • Fun Fact one: Unlike wheat flour, which contains starches, protein, and fiber, tapioca flour

  • contains only starch.

  • No wonder it's so chewy.

  • Fun Fact 2: tapioca flour behaves differently in hot and cold water.

  • Starch particles are created when a large number of glucose units are joined together.

  • When these particles are mixed with cold water they disperse and float around in the water,

  • but the particles do not change.

  • When you leave the mixture out the water will eventually evaporate and you will have your

  • starch particles again.

  • However, Starch particles swell and break apart when mixed with hot water.

  • The smaller pieces then create new connections and form a network that can hold water.

  • This process is called starch gelatinization.

  • When this solution cools it becomes more gel-like.

  • With time it will lose water and become stiffer.

  • But no matter how long you wait it will not turn into starch particles again.

  • And understand this is very important when you try to make boba, because if you use the

  • wrong temperature of water at the wrong time then you won't get your boba whatsoever.

  • Since we have learned some science about boba, I think it's a good time

  • that we also learn some historyabout it.

  • Like "Who invented Boba?" which is the next PAA we are gonna talk about

  • The answer of this question is extracted from an article titled "Boba tea: How did it

  • start?" published by CNN Travel.

  • According to this article, it happened in 1988, one day, the product development manager

  • in Chun Shui Tang teahouse , Lin Hsiu Hui sitting in a staff meeting and had brought

  • with her a typical Taiwanese dessert called fen yuan,which is a sweetened tapioca pudding.

  • Just for fun she poured the tapioca balls into her Assam iced tea and drank it.

  • Everyone at the meeting loved the drink and it quickly outsold all of their other iced

  • teas within a couple of months, soon bubble tea makes up 80-90% of their sales ever since.

  • I am not surprised because it's super addictive, but Why is bubble tea addictive?

  • which is the next PAA we are gonna talk about

  • The answer is extracted from an article titled "The Main Reason Why Bubble Tea is Addictive

  • & It's Not Due to the Pearls" published by goodyfeed.com, which is a Singapore online magazine.

  • I just read their about page, it sounds like a Singapore version of BuzzFeed.

  • According to this article, the main reason that bubble tea is addictive is the caffeine

  • in the tea.

  • I want to say I do not agree with the thesis of this article, because if that is the case,

  • the sale of Chun Shui Tang teahouse should be evenly

  • distributed to all caffeinated drinks right? It won't be like...

  • bubble tea make up 80-90% of their sales.

  • I give kudo to this article because it did point out how much caffeine

  • you can potentially ingest by drinking bubble tea.

  • It cited statistics from caffeineinformer.com, in which they tested ten samples of boba teas

  • , the amount of caffeine in each cup is about 100 to 160 mg, which average out to

  • about 130 mg per cup.

  • To put you into perspective, some coffee only has about 100 mg per cup.

  • So you can potentially drink more caffeine by drinking bubble tea compared to drinking coffee.

  • Well, that sure is crazy, but it won't kill you, right?

  • Let's talk about another two PAAs : Can tapioca pearls kill you?, and Does tapioca contain cyanide?

  • The first time I saw this PAA on the Google search result, I was like, what a dumb question.Does

  • tapioca contain cyanide?

  • Give me a break.

  • But then I realized I was being ignorant by assuming people asking this question out of ignorance.

  • No question is a dumb question, and (the reason) people ask this question on google is that

  • tapioca that we use are refined products of cassava which

  • indeed contains cyanide precursors.

  • So the answer to this question is extracted from an article titled "TAPIOCA AND CYANIDE"

  • published by todayifoundout.com which is a derivative website from a youtube channel

  • based on the idea that you should try to learn something new every day call today I found out.

  • According to this article, cassava can be split into two general classifications: sweet

  • and bitter.

  • Although both contain cyanogenic glycosides, which are chemical compounds contained in

  • foods that release hydrogen cyanide when digested by humans.

  • bitter cassava may have as much as 400 mg of cyanogenic glycosides per kilo, potentially

  • 8 times more toxic than sweet cassava.

  • But as a boba tea drinker, you actually don't need to worry about it too much.

  • As it turns out, Cyanogenic glycosides are always present in a startling number of plants

  • cultivated for human consumption that include almonds, lima beans, and cassava.

  • We don't get sick from eating these products because, by the time they reach us, the toxins

  • have been eliminated.

  • Eaten grade cassava, for example, usually has been properly treated in a labor-intensive

  • process that may include roasting, soaking, or fermentation, so by the time we get to

  • eat it, the cyanide content is negligible.

  • Alright, So boba is not that bad, but you know what is bad?

  • Boba Liberalism!

  • But wait what is that?

  • Which is the next PAA we are going to talk about.

  • The answer to this question is extracted from an article titled "The Rise(and Stall)

  • of Boba Generation" published by Eater, which is a food and dining website

  • owned by Vox Media.

  • This is a very long article that started off by elaborately discussing the cultural significance

  • of bubble tea to the Asian community, then the author goes on to explain how bubble tea

  • and " food porn" in general has become a symbol for Asian American to rectify their perceived

  • differences in western countries.

  • It's like, you might not like some aspects of my culture, but who can hate Bubble Tea? Everyone LOVEs it!

  • But this kind of tendency to pursue more positive representation in mainstream media by highlight the more

  • western friendlyaspect of Asian culture while selectively ignore other aspects of

  • ethnic issues is criticized by some activists in Asian Community.

  • They call this kind of activism boba liberalism.Because it's like boba tea.

  • A lot of sugar, a lot of calories, but no nutrition, no substance

  • For example, while some Asian American appraise the Asian representation inCrazy Rich Asian

  • the critics of Boba liberalism tend to think the film is a bad representation

  • because it selectively highlight the life style of middle and higher class Asian population

  • and to some degree reinforce themodel minority myth

  • Another criticism of boba liberalism is that if you focus on chasing the positive representation

  • of your home countries or your countries of origin, you might be reluctant to speak out to other social

  • issues of your home countries(like poverty and, in some case, human right infringement)

  • you might even try to suppress negative coverage of your home countries

  • just because you don't want your home countries' image being hurt. We all know that happens.

  • If you want to learn mor e about what is boba liberalism, I include a lot of further reading

  • in the description.Very interesting concept.

  • At the end of the video, I want to explain why some Taiwanese start calling Boba tea,

  • "QQ milky milky extremely delicious to the point that Miē pū tea."

  • That's because if you haven't noticed yet, recent years a lot of boba tea shops in Taiwan

  • are trying to be clever about naming their drink and sometimes it can be very

  • annoying because now when you go to the boba shop and look at the menu

  • you probably can't tell what are they selling anymore.

  • In response, a Taiwanese comedian ChillSeph made a video making fun of this situation by

  • calling boba tea "QQ milky milky extremely delicious to the point that Miē pū tea"

  • and a lot of Taiwanese started to calling boba tea that name ever since.

  • I will put the link in the description, it's really funny.

  • Anyway, see you later.

Today we are going to talk about a drink called "QQ milky milky extremely delicious to the

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Bubble Tea: The Science, History, and Politics

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    羅紹桀 posted on 2021/04/17
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